Author Topic: What should the first words spoken on Mars be?  (Read 6665 times)

Offline Apollo-phill

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Re: What should the first words spoken on Mars be?
« Reply #40 on: 02/13/2023 09:07 pm »
Made it !
Now we can really stretch our legs after being cramped up for months 🤠

Offline whitelancer64

Re: What should the first words spoken on Mars be?
« Reply #41 on: 02/13/2023 09:56 pm »
For IVA comms, clearly something like, "SpaceX, the Starship has landed."

Then they'll have a week or two (more?) of physical therapy for gravity adaptation inside the vehicle to practice their "first step" sound bite before they can realistically suit up to go outside for an hours-long walk. Or maybe they have like space wheelchairs or mobility scooters for an early EVA? But that's not really the kind of footprint we've had in mind.

Astronauts are NOT debilitated after months in space. The vast majority of them are able to get up and walk around on their own within hours of landing, and almost all of them can do so within a day. The reason that astronauts are helped out of their capsules and seated in chairs afterwards is a precaution, they don't want anyone fainting as the blood rushes away from their heads. It does take the body a while to adjust to being in gravity again.

Scott Kelly, after spending a year in space on the ISS, got off of a plane and was walking and standing, all unassisted, at a press conference in Houston well within 24 hours of landing on Earth.

After landing on Mars, it would be prudent to take a day to rest, to let the crew adjust to gravity again, and to moving around in gravity, and of course do all the checks and rechecks of ship systems to make sure nothing rattled loose during the landing and everything is working normally. The first EVA / steps on Mars could probably be done the next day.
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

Offline edzieba

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Re: What should the first words spoken on Mars be?
« Reply #42 on: 02/14/2023 08:18 am »
Scott Kelly, after spending a year in space on the ISS, got off of a plane and was walking and standing, all unassisted, at a press conference in Houston well within 24 hours of landing on Earth.
Scott Kelly himself disagrees. As anyone who has known or worked with anyone with a fatigue disability will be aware, the ability to exert on a single task is not representative of the ability to exert repeatedly or over a continuous period.

Offline AmigaClone

Re: What should the first words spoken on Mars be?
« Reply #43 on: 02/14/2023 12:01 pm »
I suspect the first words spoken from Mars might mirror those of Neil Armstrong after the Lunar Module Eagle had landed. There later might be a short speech by the mission commander when he first steps foot on the surface of Mars a day or two later during the first Martian EVA.

What those words might be will depend greatly on who is the commander of that mission.

Offline spacenut

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Re: What should the first words spoken on Mars be?
« Reply #44 on: 02/14/2023 01:30 pm »
Didn't Musk say launching only during the synod Mars is closest to Earth would take less than 3 months?  Maybe even one month?  That is a shorter time than the stays on the ISS.  Anyway, I think it will be a Starship with hand picked crew to begin with.  Maybe Isaacman will be the first one to set foot on Mars.  What would he say?

Offline whitelancer64

Re: What should the first words spoken on Mars be?
« Reply #45 on: 02/14/2023 03:44 pm »
Scott Kelly, after spending a year in space on the ISS, got off of a plane and was walking and standing, all unassisted, at a press conference in Houston well within 24 hours of landing on Earth.

Scott Kelly himself disagrees. As anyone who has known or worked with anyone with a fatigue disability will be aware, the ability to exert on a single task is not representative of the ability to exert repeatedly or over a continuous period.

He disagrees? Are you saying he didn't get off an airplane in Houston, walk around in front of press cameras, and stand unassisted while talking to said press within 24 hours of landing on Earth? I'll take there are literally pictures of it happening for $500, Alex.

Yes, there are negative health effects from spending time in zero g, some quite serious, some with long term effects, and some individuals will be worse off than others. It takes time for the body to get used to gravity again, which can be difficult and painful, as described in the article you linked to. I'm not disputing any of that.

However, these effects DO NOT debilitate astronauts such that they can't walk around and do tasks within a day or so of landing on Mars.

The linked article ends on a very positive note:

"I tell my flight surgeon, Steve, that I feel well enough to get right to work immediately upon returning from space, and I do, but within a few days I feel much worse. This is what it means to have allowed my body to be used for science. I will be a test subject for the rest of my life. A few months after arriving back on Earth, though, I feel distinctly better. I've been travelling the country and the world talking about my experiences in space.
...

I also know that if we want to go to Mars, it will be very, very difficult, it will cost a great deal of money and it may likely cost human lives. But I know now that if we decide to do it, we can."
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

Offline litton4

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Re: What should the first words spoken on Mars be?
« Reply #46 on: 02/14/2023 04:40 pm »
Dave Condliffe

Offline Jimmy_C

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Re: What should the first words spoken on Mars be?
« Reply #47 on: 02/14/2023 09:50 pm »
Whoopie! Man, that may have been a small one for Neil, but thatís a big one for me!

(Bonus points if you know where thatís from.)

Tags: speech Mars Exploration 
 

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