Author Topic: Vulcan : USSF 106 : Q2 2024  (Read 11251 times)

Offline gongora

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Vulcan : USSF 106 : Q2 2024
« on: 09/15/2020 11:08 pm »
One of the initial two orders given to ULA under the NSSL Phase 2 contract.  Multiple payloads to (GTO/GEO?).

One payload is the 1250kg NTS-3 satellite for testing PNT (positioning, navigation, and timing) technologies.

[Space News] Air Force Research Laboratory’s NTS-3 satellite to launch on ULA’s Vulcan
« Last Edit: 07/29/2023 01:00 am by AndrewM »


Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #2 on: 09/08/2021 04:59 am »
Cross-post with image attached; launch scheduled Q2 FY 2023 = Q1 CY 2023 (chronological year):
Presented by Col. Melone at today's [September 7] SPRSA meeting.
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Offline Yiosie

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #3 on: 08/30/2022 09:28 am »
Cross-post:

Launch now scheduled for mid-to-late 2023.

New head of AFRL space vehicles looking for talent to help push technology forward [dated Aug. 29]

Quote from: SpaceNews
The Air Force Research Laboratory’s Space Vehicles Directorate over the next three years hopes to launch big-ticket military experiments, including a GPS-like navigation satellite, a solar power spacecraft and a deep-space mission to monitor regions around the moon.

An $84 million experiment scheduled to launch in mid to late 2023 is the Navigation Technology Satellite-3 (NTS-3), which will fly to a geostationary Earth orbit to augment the positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) services provided by GPS satellites.

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #4 on: 01/29/2023 09:16 am »
Quote
Latest milestone brings NTS-3 Vanguard closer to 2023 launch

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. (AFRL) - The Department of the Air Force’s Navigation Technology Satellite-3, or NTS-3, Vanguard program has reached another major milestone in preparation for the satellite’s launch in late 2023.

Industry partner L3Harris Technologies, the spacecraft prime contractor, recently delivered the NTS-3 space vehicle to an Air Force Research Laboratory, or AFRL, integration and test facility at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. The satellite integrates an agile positioning, navigation and timing, or PNT, payload to the Northrop Grumman ESPAStar bus, to provide a space platform for AFRL and partner organization experiments and integrated capability demonstrations.

In 2019, the U.S. Department of the Air Force designated NTS-3 as one of the first three Vanguard programs to deliver innovative, game-changing capabilities to the warfighter at an accelerated pace. NTS-3, which is managed by the AFRL Transformational Capabilities Office and has program partners in both the U.S. Space Force and U.S. Air Force, will push the boundary of PNT technology to pave the way for a more flexible, robust and resilient architecture for satellite navigation.

Arlen Biersgreen, the NTS-3 program manager, was thrilled to witness the delivery of the space vehicle and all ground support equipment needed for the remaining integration and test tasks.

“This major milestone marks the transition from space system development at contractor’s facilities to the final stage of integration and test activities,” Biersgreen said. “The AFRL team will be overseeing and working closely with L3Harris and other key industry partners to apply an effective combination of contractor and government resources to successfully complete this phase of the effort.”

AFRL and L3Harris are now completing the remaining intra-payload and payload-to-bus functional and performance tests, including the first radio frequency broadcast tests of the novel PNT signals that will be demonstrated from near-geosynchronous orbit after the NTS-3 launch.

Biersgreen said following those activities, the team will perform standard space environment tests that simulate the launch and space environments to verify the system is ready for the rigors of experimental operations in space. He added that experimental performance data from ground testing will be available for sharing with program partners during  the next several months.

The Global Navigation Satellite System Test Architecture, or GNSSTA, developed by the MITRE Corporation in partnership with the AFRL Sensors Directorate, is crucial for meeting end-to-end NTS-3 mission objectives. GNSSTA is a reprogrammable software-defined receiver allowing users to receive both legacy GPS and advanced signals generated by NTS-3. It lays the groundwork for future operational receivers to provide the Space Force with options to prevent and respond quickly to common threats on the battlefield, like GPS jamming and spoofing.

Dr. Joanna Hinks, the NTS-3 principal investigator, has worked closely with the Sensors team on the GNSSTA development and testing.

"The entire team is excited that earlier this month, we successfully generated signals on the actual spacecraft and received them with our experimental GNSSTA user equipment,” Hinks said. “Showing the space segment and user segment working together like that is an important step to being ready to conduct experiments on-orbit."

NTS-3 is the first U.S. experiment of its kind in nearly 50 years, since the Navy Research Laboratory’s NTS-1 and NTS-2 spacecraft led the way for the Global Positioning System, or GPS, constellation in the 1970s.

“This Vanguard not only aims to support GPS users through vital development of new technologies and techniques, but also to show how an agile and responsive U.S. satellite navigation architecture is paramount to defeating the most challenging threats to warfighter success, both today and through the coming decades,” Biersgreen said.
[Jan. 26]
https://www.afrl.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/3278985/latest-milestone-brings-nts-3-vanguard-closer-to-2023-launch/
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Offline Vahe231991

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #5 on: 01/31/2023 03:50 am »
Quote
Latest milestone brings NTS-3 Vanguard closer to 2023 launch

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. (AFRL) - The Department of the Air Force’s Navigation Technology Satellite-3, or NTS-3, Vanguard program has reached another major milestone in preparation for the satellite’s launch in late 2023.

Industry partner L3Harris Technologies, the spacecraft prime contractor, recently delivered the NTS-3 space vehicle to an Air Force Research Laboratory, or AFRL, integration and test facility at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. The satellite integrates an agile positioning, navigation and timing, or PNT, payload to the Northrop Grumman ESPAStar bus, to provide a space platform for AFRL and partner organization experiments and integrated capability demonstrations.

In 2019, the U.S. Department of the Air Force designated NTS-3 as one of the first three Vanguard programs to deliver innovative, game-changing capabilities to the warfighter at an accelerated pace. NTS-3, which is managed by the AFRL Transformational Capabilities Office and has program partners in both the U.S. Space Force and U.S. Air Force, will push the boundary of PNT technology to pave the way for a more flexible, robust and resilient architecture for satellite navigation.

Arlen Biersgreen, the NTS-3 program manager, was thrilled to witness the delivery of the space vehicle and all ground support equipment needed for the remaining integration and test tasks.

“This major milestone marks the transition from space system development at contractor’s facilities to the final stage of integration and test activities,” Biersgreen said. “The AFRL team will be overseeing and working closely with L3Harris and other key industry partners to apply an effective combination of contractor and government resources to successfully complete this phase of the effort.”

AFRL and L3Harris are now completing the remaining intra-payload and payload-to-bus functional and performance tests, including the first radio frequency broadcast tests of the novel PNT signals that will be demonstrated from near-geosynchronous orbit after the NTS-3 launch.

Biersgreen said following those activities, the team will perform standard space environment tests that simulate the launch and space environments to verify the system is ready for the rigors of experimental operations in space. He added that experimental performance data from ground testing will be available for sharing with program partners during  the next several months.

The Global Navigation Satellite System Test Architecture, or GNSSTA, developed by the MITRE Corporation in partnership with the AFRL Sensors Directorate, is crucial for meeting end-to-end NTS-3 mission objectives. GNSSTA is a reprogrammable software-defined receiver allowing users to receive both legacy GPS and advanced signals generated by NTS-3. It lays the groundwork for future operational receivers to provide the Space Force with options to prevent and respond quickly to common threats on the battlefield, like GPS jamming and spoofing.

Dr. Joanna Hinks, the NTS-3 principal investigator, has worked closely with the Sensors team on the GNSSTA development and testing.

"The entire team is excited that earlier this month, we successfully generated signals on the actual spacecraft and received them with our experimental GNSSTA user equipment,” Hinks said. “Showing the space segment and user segment working together like that is an important step to being ready to conduct experiments on-orbit."

NTS-3 is the first U.S. experiment of its kind in nearly 50 years, since the Navy Research Laboratory’s NTS-1 and NTS-2 spacecraft led the way for the Global Positioning System, or GPS, constellation in the 1970s.

“This Vanguard not only aims to support GPS users through vital development of new technologies and techniques, but also to show how an agile and responsive U.S. satellite navigation architecture is paramount to defeating the most challenging threats to warfighter success, both today and through the coming decades,” Biersgreen said.
[Jan. 26]
https://www.afrl.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/3278985/latest-milestone-brings-nts-3-vanguard-closer-to-2023-launch/
It's quite enlightening to see the first photo of the NTS-3 to be launched along with the USSF-106 launch, especially as the Vulcan edges closer and closer to its first launch, and components for the Vulcan rockets to be used for the launch of the USSF-106 and NTS-3 for the US Space Force as well as additional USSF launches and lofting the Dream Chaser spaceplane into orbit are being fabricated.

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #6 on: 03/22/2023 02:51 am »
https://spacenews.com/air-force-nts-3-navigation-satellite-to-launch-in-2023/

https://www.c4isrnet.com/battlefield-tech/space/2021/04/28/launch-of-the-militarys-experimental-navigation-satellite-pushed-back-to-2023/

Delayed to 2023.
According to the NextSpaceflight website, the USSF 106 satellite launch has a launch window scheduled for NET January 2024. However, the launch might actually take place in late 2023 assuming that the Vulcan's maiden launch (scheduled for May) exceeds ULA's expectations in terms of performance.
« Last Edit: 03/22/2023 01:24 pm by Vahe231991 »

Offline Jim

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #7 on: 03/22/2023 05:02 pm »

According to the NextSpaceflight website, the USSF 106 satellite launch has a launch window scheduled for NET January 2024. However, the launch might actually take place in late 2023 assuming that the Vulcan's maiden launch (scheduled for May) exceeds ULA's expectations in terms of performance.

No, spacecraft launches seldom move to the right.

Offline woods170

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #8 on: 03/23/2023 08:38 am »

According to the NextSpaceflight website, the USSF 106 satellite launch has a launch window scheduled for NET January 2024. However, the launch might actually take place in late 2023 assuming that the Vulcan's maiden launch (scheduled for May) exceeds ULA's expectations in terms of performance.

No, spacecraft launches seldom move to the right.

Schedules are usually flowing from left to right: Leftmost is now, rightmost is sometime in the future.

As such:
Launches and/or spacecraft getting delayed is generally described as "moving right". In other words: moving further out into the future.
Launches and/or spacecraft happening earlier than planned is generally described as "moving left". In other words: getting closer to today.

So, if USSF 106 moves from NET January 2024 to late 2023, it moves closer to today. In other words: it moves to the left.


But I agree with Jim that spacecraft launches seldom happen earlier than originally planned.
« Last Edit: 03/23/2023 08:39 am by woods170 »

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #9 on: 03/23/2023 02:16 pm »

According to the NextSpaceflight website, the USSF 106 satellite launch has a launch window scheduled for NET January 2024. However, the launch might actually take place in late 2023 assuming that the Vulcan's maiden launch (scheduled for May) exceeds ULA's expectations in terms of performance.

No, spacecraft launches seldom move to the right.

Schedules are usually flowing from left to right: Leftmost is now, rightmost is sometime in the future.

As such:
Launches and/or spacecraft getting delayed is generally described as "moving right". In other words: moving further out into the future.
Launches and/or spacecraft happening earlier than planned is generally described as "moving left". In other words: getting closer to today.

So, if USSF 106 moves from NET January 2024 to late 2023, it moves closer to today. In other words: it moves to the left.


But I agree with Jim that spacecraft launches seldom happen earlier than originally planned.


Especially in the case of new launch vehicles such as the Vulcan-Centaur which has yet to launch for the first time.

AFAIK, most of the time when a particular payload has launched earlier than originally scheduled, the schedule change involves a second payload that that would use the same launch vehicle configuration was not close to being ready by a certain launch window. In this case the first payload might be launched within what was the planned launch window for the second payload.

As an example, if SpaceX had a contract to launch a Mars mission in the 2024 launch window using a Falcon 9, but was informed that the spacecraft would not be ready in time then they might use that particular booster to launch a Starlink mission originally scheduled for later.

Offline gongora

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #10 on: 03/23/2023 05:45 pm »
This mission isn't going to have any real date until a couple other missions have flown.  I don't understand why anyone is even worrying about it.

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #11 on: 03/24/2023 10:56 am »

According to the NextSpaceflight website, the USSF 106 satellite launch has a launch window scheduled for NET January 2024. However, the launch might actually take place in late 2023 assuming that the Vulcan's maiden launch (scheduled for May) exceeds ULA's expectations in terms of performance.

No, spacecraft launches seldom move to the right.

Schedules are usually flowing from left to right: Leftmost is now, rightmost is sometime in the future.

As such:
Launches and/or spacecraft getting delayed is generally described as "moving right". In other words: moving further out into the future.
Launches and/or spacecraft happening earlier than planned is generally described as "moving left". In other words: getting closer to today.

So, if USSF 106 moves from NET January 2024 to late 2023, it moves closer to today. In other words: it moves to the left.


But I agree with Jim that spacecraft launches seldom happen earlier than originally planned.

Was thinking of something else and typed the wrong direction.

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #12 on: 06/07/2023 04:07 pm »
https://www.edwards.af.mil/News/Article/3411593/a-mission-out-of-this-world-the-benefield-anechoic-facility-tests-first-space-s/


A Mission Out of This World: The Benefield Anechoic Facility tests first space satellite in decades

    Published May 31, 2023
    By Adam Bowles
    412th Test Wing Public Affairs

EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- 

The Benefield Anechoic Facility (BAF) at Edwards AFB recently tested its first orbital satellite in decades. Anticipated to launch in late 2023, Navigation Technology Satellite-3 (NTS-3) will be the Department of Defense’s first experimental, integrated navigation satellite system in nearly 50 years.

“This is so important because we are testing one of the new satellites that will be going up into space to help with all of our GPS systems,” Amarachi Egbuziem-Ciolkosz, Engineer, 772nd Test Squadron said. “It’s probably going to affect so many lives; not just military but commercial alike.”

In 2019, the Department of the Air Force designed NTS-3 as one of the three Vanguard programs with the goal of delivering remarkable new capabilities that provide warfighters superior advantages in the battlefield. NTS-3, developed by L3Harris Technologies, builds on the legacy of NTS-1 and NTS-2, which were launched in the 1970s. The satellite is poised to push the boundary of today’s space-based position, navigation and timing (PNT) technology paving the way for a more robust, resilient and responsive architecture for satellite (SATNAV) technology.

The rapidly increasing pace of threats to GPS such as jamming and spoofing, however, indicate that agile and resilient approaches to augment the GPS system are needed to maintain the users’ access to its critical service. This is especially true for the warfighter.

“We are testing when a satellite sends out a signal, we can actually receive that signal and it’s the correct one,” Egbuziem-Ciolkosz said. “You don’t want a satellite to send you back a signal that your house is 10 miles away when it’s actually right in front of you. We are testing all of that.”

The largest anechoic test facility in the world, the BAF, provides shielding effectiveness that allows GPS tracking and jamming tests without frequency management or regulatory agency approval.

“The BAF is large enough and has enough infrastructure around it,” Arlen Biersgreen, NTS-3 Program Manager, Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) said. “It is a quiet enough chamber that protects the aircraft and other GPS users outside of the facility. We needed to have a shielded, large enough area to keep the energy of the testing inside the facility. Across the board, the BAF really fit the bill in a way no other facility in the United States really could.”

GPS has become a vital utility for both the warfighter and commercial use across the world. NTS-3 will demonstrate technologies and techniques to augment the GPS constellation to help maintain access to GPS in contested environments. Testing at the BAF is an important step in ensuring that the AFRL team is ready to successfully conduct on-orbit experiments.

“The value of all of this is to allow for everything to be synchronized together,” Thomas Roberts, NTS-3 Chief Engineer, Air Force Research Laboratory said. “Whether it be airline schedules, take offs/landings at the airports or military operations, NTS-3 is taking this a step further because we are using clocks; but we are also doing a demonstration of advanced signals and signal flexibility. Our ability to get that job done is dependent on the success of this testing facility.”

After the testing is complete, the NTS-3 will operate for one year in a near-geosynchronous orbit and will broadcast navigation signals from its phased array antenna. But before this happens, a few more steps in the NTS-3’s journey need to be made.

“We are approaching the very end of our I&T campaign,” Biersgreen said. “After we are done here at the BAF, we will transport the satellite to Kirtland Air Force Base and get it back into our integration and test facility. We have thermal vacuum testing where we will be simulating the environment the satellite will be operating in. We also have testing to show that the ground system is compatible with the satellite. After that, we have a long training campaign for our operations crew so everyone on the team is ready to conduct this experiment after we launch.”

Truly a team effort, the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Space Force, Air Force Research Laboratory and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory all had critical roles in this historic testing of the NTS-3 satellite.

“It took countless engineers’ time and a lot of engineering effort to figure out how exactly to do this testing,” Egbuziem-Ciolkosz said. “We ran into hurdles but with the team we have here, we overcame all of them. It has been such a great time and these engineers truly blew me away with all the effort to make our mission successful. We get to see all our hard work finally realized and get to see the results that will benefit countless lives.”

https://d34w7g4gy10iej.cloudfront.net/video/2305/DOD_109670560/DOD_109670560-1024x576-2000k.mp4
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Offline Vahe231991

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #13 on: 07/23/2023 04:46 pm »
According to a recent US Space Force presentation, the USSF-106 mission is scheduled for launch on January 30, 2024. This makes sense because the Vulcan rocket is supposed to complete two launches before being certified to conduct launches under the NSSL program.
« Last Edit: 07/23/2023 04:47 pm by Vahe231991 »

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #14 on: 07/23/2023 06:05 pm »
According to a recent US Space Force presentation, the USSF-106 mission is scheduled for launch on January 30, 2024. This makes sense because the Vulcan rocket is supposed to complete two launches before being certified to conduct launches under the NSSL program.

Shouldn't you have written "This makes no sense because the Vulcan rocket is supposed to complete two launches before being certified to conduct launches under the NSSL program" ?

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #15 on: 07/23/2023 08:24 pm »
According to a recent US Space Force presentation, the USSF-106 mission is scheduled for launch on January 30, 2024. This makes sense because the Vulcan rocket is supposed to complete two launches before being certified to conduct launches under the NSSL program.

Shouldn't you have written "This makes no sense because the Vulcan rocket is supposed to complete two launches before being certified to conduct launches under the NSSL program" ?
It's Vahe. Those that know know his tendencies.

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : NET Q2 2024
« Reply #16 on: 07/23/2023 09:06 pm »
According to a recent US Space Force presentation, the USSF-106 mission is scheduled for launch on January 30, 2024. This makes sense because the Vulcan rocket is supposed to complete two launches before being certified to conduct launches under the NSSL program.

Shouldn't you have written "This makes no sense because the Vulcan rocket is supposed to complete two launches before being certified to conduct launches under the NSSL program" ?
The date for the USSF-106 launch cited on in the presentation is tentative and subject to change given that the second Vulcan launch, which involves the first orbital flight of the Dream Chaser spaceplane, has been postponed to early 2024.

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : H2 2024
« Reply #17 on: 07/23/2023 09:12 pm »
NET H2 2024 according to Tory Bruno:

Cross-post:

https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/status/1679512399282417666

Quote
ULA CEO @torybruno, during a media roundtable, lays out the upcoming schedule of Vulcan launches:

Cert-1 in 2023 Q4
Cert-2 in first half 2024
First Space Force (NSSL) launch in second half 2024
« Last Edit: 07/26/2023 01:38 am by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline RicertyRocket

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : H2 2024
« Reply #18 on: 07/23/2023 09:59 pm »
Remember the time-frame of SpaceX bringing Falcon 9 online and the hoops they had to jump thru before they were even allowed to bid on National Security Launches.
ULA is still 6 months from their inaugural launch with no guarantee of any success but they have already been awarded launches ! !
Washington DC is loaded with hypocrisy, both three letter and 4 letter agencies.
« Last Edit: 07/26/2023 01:38 am by zubenelgenubi »

Offline DanClemmensen

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Re: Vulcan : USSF 106 : H2 2024
« Reply #19 on: 07/23/2023 10:47 pm »
Thread title needs to be updated. Now H2 2024 if you are an optimist, or maybe NET H2 2024 if you are less of an optimist.

[zubenelgenubi: Done]
« Last Edit: 07/26/2023 01:39 am by zubenelgenubi »

 

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