Author Topic: NASA - Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite ( TESS ) updates  (Read 72903 times)

Offline jebbo

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Another confirmed planet from TESS:

HD 202772A B: A Transiting Hot Jupiter Around A Bright, Mildly Evolved Star In A Visual Binary Discovered By Tess

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We report the first confirmation of a hot Jupiter discovered by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission: HD 202772A b. The transit signal was detected in the data from TESS Sector 1, and was confirmed to be of planetary origin through radial-velocity measurements. HD 202772A b is orbiting a mildly evolved star with a period of 3.3 days. With an apparent magnitude of V = 8.3, the star is among the brightest known to host a hot Jupiter. Based on the 27days of TESS photometry, and radial velocity data from the CHIRON and HARPS spectrographs, the planet has a mass of 1.008+/-0.074 M_J and radius of 1.562+/-0.053 R_J , making it an inflated gas giant. HD 202772A b is a rare example of a transiting hot Jupiter around a quickly evolving star. It is also one of the most strongly irradiated hot Jupiters currently known.

Arxiv link

--- Tony

Offline jebbo

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Two TESS papers out today on re-examining the Kepler field:

Prospects for Refining Kepler TTV Masses using TESS Observations
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In this paper we investigate systems previously identified to exhibit transit timing variations (TTVs) in Kepler data, with the goal of predicting the expected improvements to the mass and eccentricity constraints that will arise from combining Kepler data with future data from the TESS mission. We advocate for the use of the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence as a means to quantify improvements in the measured constraints. Compared to the original Kepler data, the TESS data will have a lower signal-to-noise ratio, rendering some of the planetary transits undetectable, and lowering the accuracy with which the transit mid-time can be estimated. Despite these difficulties, out of the 55 systems (containing 143 planets) investigated, we predict that the collection of short-cadence data by TESS will be of significant value (i.e. it will improve the mass uncertainty such that the KL divergence is > 0.1) for approximately 6 - 14 planets during the nominal mission, with the range primarily driven by the uncertain precision with which transit mid-times will be recovered from TESS data. In an extended mission this would increase to a total of approximately 12 - 25 planets.
Arxiv link

Observations of the Kepler Field with TESS: Predictions for Planet Yield and Observable Features
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We examine the ability of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) to detect and improve our understanding of planetary systems in the Kepler field. By modeling the expected transits of all confirmed and candidate planets detected by Kepler as expected to be observed by TESS, we find that TESS has a greater than 50% chance of detecting 277 of these planets at the 3 sigma level in one sector of observations and an additional 128 planets in two sectors. Most of these are large planets in short orbits around their host stars, although a small number of rocky planets are expected to be recovered. Most of these systems have only one known transiting planet; in only ~5 percent of known multiply-transiting systems do we anticipate more than one planet to be recovered. When these planets are recovered, we expect TESS to be a powerful tool to characterizing transit timing variations. Using Kepler-88 (KOI-142) as an example, we show that TESS will improve measurements of planet-star mass ratios and orbital parameters, and significantly reduce the transit timing uncertainty in future years. Since TESS will be most sensitive to hot Jupiters, we research whether TESS will be able to detect tidal orbital decay in these systems. We find two confirmed planetary systems (Kepler-2 b and Kepler-13 b) and five candidate systems that will be good candidates to detect tidal decay.
Arxiv link

--- Tony


Offline jebbo

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Another discovery:

A Jovian planet in an eccentric 11.5 day orbit around HD1397 discovered by TESS
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The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite TESS has begun a new age of exoplanet discoveries around bright host stars. We present the discovery of HD 1397b (TOI-120.01), a giant planet in an 11.54day eccentric orbit around a bright (V=7.9) G-type subgiant. We estimate both host star and planetary parameters consistently using EXOFASTv2 based on TESS time-series photometry of transits and CORALIE radial velocity measurements. We find that HD 1397b is a Jovian planet, with a mass of 0.419±−0.024 MJup and a radius of 1.023+0.023−0.026$ RJup. Characterising giant planets in short-period eccentric orbits, such as HD 1397b, is important for understanding and testing theories for the formation and migration of giant planets as well as planet-star interactions.
Arxiv link

Offline deruch

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Another discovery:

A Jovian planet in an eccentric 11.5 day orbit around HD1397 discovered by TESS
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...We find that HD 1397b is a Jovian planet, with a mass of 0.419±−0.024 MJup...

That MJup really threw me there for a second.  My brain was very determined to read it as MegaJupiters for a bit.
« Last Edit: 11/07/2018 04:52 am by deruch »
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Offline jebbo

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Another paper on yesterday's discovery:

HD 1397b: a transiting warm giant planet orbiting a V = 7.8 mag sub-giant star discovered by TESS
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We report the discovery of a transiting planet first identified as a candidate in Sector 1 of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), and then confirmed with precision radial velocities. HD1397b has a mass of MP = 0.335+0.018−0.018 MJ, a radius of RP = 1.021+0.015−0.014 MJ, and orbits its bright host star (V=7.8 mag) with an orbital period of 11.53508±0.00057 d, on a moderately eccentric orbit (e = 0.210 ± 0.038). With a mass of M⋆ = 1.284+0.020−0.016 MJ, a radius of R⋆ = 2.314+0.049−0.042 RJ, and an age of 4.7 ± 0.2 Gyr, the solar metallicity host star has already departed from the main sequence. We find evidence in the radial velocity measurements for a long term acceleration, and a P≈18 d periodic signal that we attribute to rotational modulation by stellar activity. The HD1397 system is among the brightest systems currently known to host a transiting planet, which will make it possible to perform detailed follow-up observations in order to characterize the properties of giant planets orbiting evolved stars.
Arxiv link

--- Tony

Offline jebbo

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Sector 1 and 2 data has now been released to MAST

--- Tony

Offline jebbo

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And the candidates are available on ExoFOP

--- Tony


Offline Semmel

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Quote
   
TESS Mission Data Now Available http://archive.stsci.edu/archive_news/2018/TESS-12-Dec/index.html

/All data from TESS Observation Sectors 1 and 2 are now publicly available for download with a number of MAST services./

The first batch of Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission data is now available through MAST! This release includes all data from Sectors 1 and 2, observed between July 25 and September 20, 2018. Data products include 2-minute cadence target pixel files (*_tp.fits), extracted light curves (*_lc.fits), and 30-minute cadence full frame images (*_ffic.fits) among others http://archive.stsci.edu/tess/all_products.html. Now, anybody can access these data products, opening an exciting phase of community discovery with TESS data.

https://mast.stsci.edu/tesscut/ /The TESScut tool at MAST/
https://exo.mast.stsci.edu /Light curve previews on exo.MAST/

For a brief overview of MAST services available for TESS data, please see our summary page https://outerspace.stsci.edu/display/TESS/5.0+-+Ways+To+Search+And+Interact+With+TESS+Data+At+MAST. To dive in deeper, the TESS Archive Manual https://outerspace.stsci.edu/display/TESS/TESS+Archive+Manual details the different TESS data products, tutorials on how to use them, and detailed instructions on how to download them from MAST. The official TESS Instrument Handbook https://archive.stsci.edu/missions/tess/doc/TESS_Instrument_Handbook_v0.1.pdf and data release notes for these sectors http://archive.stsci.edu/tess/tess_drn.html are also available.

MAST provides several ways to access TESS data, each with their own specialized purpose:

  * Obtain data for individual targets using the MAST Portal.
    https://mast.stsci.edu/portal/Mashup/Clients/Mast/Portal.html
  * Preview TESS folded light curves for known exoplanets using
    exo.MAST, and find data from complementary MAST missions.
    https://exo.mast.stsci.edu
  * Include TESS data retrieval routines in scripts using the MAST API.
    https://astroquery.readthedocs.io/en/latest/mast/mast.html
  * Obtain a time series of images for any target within TESS FFIs using
    TESScut (avoid downloading the entire sector of data!).
    https://mast.stsci.edu/tesscut/
  * Download all data by Observation Sector or GI Program with Bulk
    Downloads. http://archive.stsci.edu/tess/bulk_downloads.html

The TESS mission https://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/tess/ is a NASA Astrophysics Explorer mission launched by a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on April 18, 2018. TESS is currently conducting an all-sky survey for transiting extrasolar planets around nearby and bright stars. TESS will produce an invaluable set of exoplanet candidates, which are highly amenable for follow-up spectroscopic characterization to determine the planet masses and atmospheric compositions. In addition, TESS’s wide-area time-series images will have lasting value for stellar and Galactic astrophysics.

STScI will also be hosting a workshop in February http://www.stsci.edu/institute/conference/tess to provide talks, tutorials, and some hands-on sessions with TESS data. Any further questions on accessing and using TESS mission data products can be submitted to the Archive Helpdesk http://masthelp.stsci.edu/.

http://www.stsci.edu/institute/conference/tess


/Funding for the TESS mission is provided by NASA’s Science Mission directorate. TESS team partners include the Massachusetts Institute of Technology https://tess.mit.edu, the Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research http://space.mit.edu/space-based-observatories/tess-transiting-exoplanet-survey-satellite, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov, MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory https://www.ll.mit.edu/r-d/projects/transiting-exoplanet-survey-satellite, Orbital ATK http://www.orbitalatk.com, NASA’s Ames Research Center https://www.nasa.gov/ames/tess-pipeline, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics https://www.cfa.harvard.edu, and the Space Telescope Science Institute https://www.stsci.edu/./

STScI https://twitter.com/MAST_News/ STScI https://www.facebook.com/MASTArchive/ STScI mailto:[email protected]


Offline Dao Angkan

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A couple of "Neptunes" validated by archival HARPS radial velocity data;

TESS exoplanet candidates validated with HARPS archival data. A massive Neptune around GJ143 and two Neptunes around HD23472

Interestingly, the former was recovered in RV data after only a single transit from TESS, which is promising for recovering longer period planets with single transits. The latter will require further RV measurements to constrain the parameters.
« Last Edit: 12/12/2018 08:12 pm by Dao Angkan »

Offline jebbo

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Offline Star One

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The independent discovery of planet candidates around low mass stars and astrophysical false positives from the first two TESS sectors



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Continuous data releases throughout the TESS primary mission will provide unique opportunities for the exoplanet community at large to contribute to maximizing TESS's scientific return via the discovery and validation of transiting planets. This paper introduces our independent detection pipeline of periodic transit events along with the results of its inaugural application to the recently released 2 minute light curves of low mass stars from the first two TESS sectors. The stellar parameters within our sample are refined using precise parallax measurements from the GAIA DR2 which reduces the number of low mass stars in our sample relative to those listed in the TESS Input Catalog. In lieu of the follow-up observations required to confirm or refute the planetary nature of transit-like signals, a validation of transit-like events flagged by our pipeline is performed statistically. The resulting vetted catalog contains seven probable blended eclipsing binaries, eight known TOIs, plus eight new planet candidates smaller than 4 Earth radii. This work demonstrates the ability of our pipeline to detect sub-Neptune-sized planet candidates which to-date, represent some of the most attractive targets for future atmospheric characterization via transmission or thermal emission spectroscopy and for radial velocity efforts aimed at the completion of the TESS level one requirement to deliver 50 planets smaller than 4 Earth radii with measured masses.

Offline ncb1397

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The nearby exoplanet, HD 21749b, orbits a bright neighboring star in the Reticulum constellation, with a 36-day orbit and a surface temperature of 300 degrees Fahrenheit. That's actually quite cool, considering how close the planet is to its star.

The discovery was announced Monday at the 233rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Seattle.
https://www.cnn.com/2019/01/07/world/tess-mission-first-exoplanet-discoveries/index.html

Offline SciNews

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TESS discovers its third new planet, with longest orbit yet
http://news.mit.edu/2019/tess-discovers-third-planet-0107
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The new planet, named HD 21749b, orbits a bright, nearby dwarf star about 53 light years away, in the constellation Reticulum, and appears to have the longest orbital period of the three planets so far identified by TESS. HD 21749b journeys around its star in a relatively leisurely 36 days, compared to the two other planets — Pi Mensae b, a “super-Earth” with a 6.3-day orbit, and LHS 3844b, a rocky world that speeds around its star in just 11 hours. All three planets were discovered in the first three months of TESS observations.
The surface of the new planet is likely around 300 degrees Fahrenheit — relatively cool, given its proximity to its star, which is almost as bright as the sun.

Offline whitelancer64

Quick question: When does TESS look at Alpha Centauri?
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Offline Alpha_Centauri

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Sector 11 (2019-Apr-22 to 2019-May-21) and Sector 12 (2019-May-21 to 2019-Jun-19)

But I wouldn't get your hopes up, I can't imagine there'll be much in the way of usable data since Alpha Cen is so bright the CCD will be saturated.
« Last Edit: 01/09/2019 02:16 am by Alpha_Centauri »

Offline The Vorlon

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Tau Ceti would be a nice target too.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Tau Ceti would be a nice target too.
Would this be a cryptic clue from a member of an alien species far older than our own? ;)
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Offline Star One

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NASA Exoplanet Hunter Racks Up Bizarre Worlds and Exploding Stars

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The spacecraft also does more than hunt planets. Mission scientists have studied 101 stars that brightened suddenly, probably because they were exploding supernovae, says Michael Fausnaugh, an astronomer at MIT. Because TESS stares non-stop at one slice of the sky for 27 days, then moves to a neighbouring slice, it captures an unprecedented view of these exploding stars as they brighten and then dim.

“Based on the brightness and shape of that flare, there’s a lot of science that can be done,” Fausnaugh says. For instance, astronomers can scrutinize the way in which the light increases for clues to the type of star that exploded to create a particular flash. TESS discovered six supernovae in just its first month of observing; its predecessor, NASA’s Kepler space telescope, discovered five over the course of four years, Fausnaugh says.

Offline theinternetftw

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NASA Exoplanet Hunter Racks Up Bizarre Worlds and Exploding Stars

Other highlights from that article:

Quote
TESS works better than team members had dared to dream, says George Ricker, a physicist at MIT and the mission’s principal investigator. Its four cameras can see objects 20% fainter, and focus more sharply, than originally expected. [...]

His team is now writing a proposal to NASA asking that TESS’s mission be extended past its initial two years. That deadline for the proposal was 1 February—but the ongoing partial US government shutdown means Ricker isn’t sure how that timing could change.

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