Recent Posts

Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]
91
Why not do the servicing mission with Polaris Dawn?  They've given themselves extra training time. 

It does strike me as a wild thing to do on the crews first EVA.  I'm not sure it's wilder than the missions NASA's own astronauts have done on their first missions?

This would not be done on the first Polaris Dawn flight.

A Hubble servicing mission would be a separate NASA-run flight.

Question, does anyone know? How many astronauts that have done Hubble servicing are still in the active astronaut corps?

Megan McArthur and Drew Feustel are the two remaining STS-125 crew members still active.

Note that Megan McArthur has flown on a Crew Dragon (Crew 2). She operated the shuttle robotic arm on STS-125. Drew Feustel was one of the four spacewalkers on STS-125.
92
I guess it could just be defining the parameters of the start box, but I bet they want to know how quickly they can get the booster headed back after ship separation.
That would imply an evaluation of alternatives to the "baseline" separation concept in which the Booster would pitch up into a power-on backflip while the Ship separates under centrifugal force (like Starlink v1.x). That approach would not require an engine restart event until the landing burn. But if they want to do the stage separation more like Falcon RTLS with a MECO followed by a boostback burn, then this would be the type of engine test they'd want to run.

The "flippin' stage" maneuver will be cool to see them attempt, but maybe it's prudent to have a backup plan involving a MECO and a set of electric linear actuators to effect a positive stage separation (improvement over pneumatic pushers for reusability).

Or maybe a combo. Start power flip, separate, kill engines, wait for rotation to complete,  then restart engine subset and head home. Why boost the wrong direction for 9 seconds or whatever. Save fuel and reduce stress instead at the risk of complexity?
93
"SLS isnít viewed in a vacuum"
That may be, BUT aren't NSF Threads in a vacuum?  Talk about another rocket outside SLS thread will get you a nasty message, so how/why compare to other rockets in the first place?

"If you can convince people that the SLS deserves to exist, then such ideas would no doubt get more discussion."
1. OK, SS has not flown yet.  What if unlike F9, SpX can't make it work?  Or at least can't make it work without investing more money than Elon can afford or not for another 5 or 6 years?

2. What if BO scraps NG? Or again can't make it work or quits?

Isn't having SLS about having choices?  More than one option?  Face the fact that Congress is never going to through money at Musk or Bezos carte blanche.  When there is an alternative up and running, THEN the comparisons can be made outside the vacuum.
94
Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLV/SLS) / Re: SLS General Discussion Thread 8
« Last post by mn on Today at 06:13 pm »

THIS is a large part of why I left NSF many years ago and why I will probably do so again very shortly. Try to be helpful or get people to be balanced about their thinking and you will be roasted for it.


The anti SLS is warranted.   Anything else is better.   It is the SpaceX only fanatical young males are the issue.

I'm with Rick.  95% of the discussion on this thread has been to complain about cost, schedule and flight rate.  While valid issues, it is a dispiriting drumbeat.  I would much rather have discussions on technical and programmatic changes that could improve the SLS program.  The latter discussion would educate and maybe lead to positive improvements.  For example:
* Design improvements to mitigate hydrogen leaks and improve sensor reliability
* FTS design changes to increase the batter life or allow for charging after installation
* Pad flow improvements to reduce roll-out times
* Identify and resolve bottleneck issues to increase production rate of SLS so that you could have a higher flight rate.
* Co-manifest options with Orion
* Mobile launcher upgrades to improve serviceability, weight, and alignment issues
* Refueling of the core hydrogen tank in LEO as a cryo depot or wet workshop, perhaps after BOLE is implemented that could get the core into a stable LEO orbit.
* Recovery and reusability upgrades for SLS components
* Material science discussion on alternatives to the foam insulation around the core tank.

Those are just a few ideas, many more are out there.     

We've been doing hydrogen for many many years, the SLS implementation must be state of the art, the best that engineering can do. Boeing started with a clean slate and all the accumulated knowledge of past experience. I can't imagine this can be improved upon.

BTW what's the correct emoji for sarcasm, my local teenager is not here to help me.
95
Why not do the servicing mission with Polaris Dawn?  They've given themselves extra training time. 

It does strike me as a wild thing to do on the crews first EVA.  I'm not sure it's wilder than the missions NASA's own astronauts have done on their first missions?

This would not be done on the first Polaris Dawn flight.

A Hubble servicing mission would be a separate NASA-run flight.

Question, does anyone know? How many astronauts that have done Hubble servicing are still in the active astronaut corps?

Megan McArthur and Drew Feustel are the two remaining STS-125 crew members still active.
96
https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1575537250955239425

Quote
GAO offers recommendations on dealing with large constellations.

https://www.gao.gov/products/gao-22-105166

Quote
Large Constellations of Satellites:
Mitigating Environmental and Other Effects


GAO-22-105166
Published: Sep 29, 2022. Publicly Released: Sep 29, 2022.
98
Why not do the servicing mission with Polaris Dawn?  They've given themselves extra training time. 

It does strike me as a wild thing to do on the crews first EVA.  I'm not sure it's wilder than the missions NASA's own astronauts have done on their first missions?

This would not be done on the first Polaris Dawn flight.

A Hubble servicing mission would be a separate NASA-run flight.

Question, does anyone know? How many astronauts that have done Hubble servicing are still in the active astronaut corps?
99
Is Dec still plausible for the first mission?

The long pole is probably the spacesuits (although I think some Dragon modifications are needed t00, to support full depressurisation and re-pressurisation for EVA?). EVA training has started, so I think the crew will be ready.

Various tweets hint at good progress on the suits and Jared has said recently still planning on this year. So I'd say definitely plausible, and probably credible! Still wouldn't be surprised to see it slip to Q1 2023.

Crew Dragon was already designed for full depressurization and re-pressurization. It's the standard operation in case of fire in the crew cabin.
100
Why not do the servicing mission with Polaris Dawn?  They've given themselves extra training time. 

It does strike me as a wild thing to do on the crews first EVA.  I'm not sure it's wilder than the missions NASA's own astronauts have done on their first missions?
Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]
Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement SkyTale Software GmbH
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
0