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21
I suspect that SpaceX is ignoring the competition when they set their prices.

Even this milquetoast statement is slanderous to SpaceX.

We can be 100% certain that the competition is not a variable in how SpaceX sets its rideshare prices.  The first reason is logical.  The second and third are empirical.

(1) The competition's prices do not give any useful information to SpaceX.  Rather, factoring in those prices just enters noise into SpaceX's testing of the market.

(2) SpaceX hasn't been sued.  If there was any shred of potential SpaceX anti-competitive behavior, you can be sure that Rocket Lab and others would be in SpaceX's shorts legally.

(3) SpaceX's prices do not resemble the prices that others offer.

We have seen quite a few companies testing new markets without reference to competitors.  Perhaps the most famous is Ford's pricing on its Model T.

Per M.E.T.'s interpretation of antitrust law, setting prices with the specific intent of undercutting competitors is not illegal, thus the lack of legal action against SpaceX does not prove anything regarding how SpaceX sets their prices.

I think the point here is that SpaceX could achieve the same result by setting prices at 9/10ths the competition. If they are at 1/6th, one can infer they are not undercutting, they are in a different arena.
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Where are the crew? Are they still in Houston?
Shit, we forgot the crew!
I thought you got them!
I thought YOU got them!
Well it's too late to get them now...

(That's how Capricorn 1 should really have started ...)
23
With Atlas going off line and Delta and A5 just memories, where does humanity stand on launchers certified for hot material?
24
ISS Section / Re: Expedition 71 thread
« Last post by ddspaceman on Today at 06:07 pm »
Cargo Ship Departs, Two Rockets Near Launch During Busy Day on Station

Mark Garcia Posted on May 28, 2024

A cargo ship departed the International Space Station on Tuesday leaving four spacecraft parked at the orbital lab. Meanwhile, as the Expedition 71 crew keeps up its advanced microgravity research two more spaceships are counting down to their missions to the orbital outpost in less than a week.

A trash-loaded Progress 86 cargo craft undocked from the space stationís Poisk module at 4:39 a.m. EDT on Tuesday. The Roscosmos resupply ship ended its six-month stay in space a few hours later when it reentered the Earthís atmosphere for a safe, but fiery demise above the Pacific Ocean.

Meanwhile, two rockets are gearing up to launch more cargo and a new crew to the orbiting outpost by the end of the week. First, more than three tons of food, fuel, and supplies are scheduled to lift off aboard the Progress 88 spacecraft at 5:43 a.m. on Thursday from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The resupply ship from Roscosmos will then orbit Earth for two days before its automated docking to Poisk at 7:47 a.m. on Saturday.

Cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Nikolai Chub trained on Tuesday for the arrival of the Progress 88. The duo practiced for the unlikely possibility of remotely controlling the spacecraft with the space stationís telerobotically operated rendezvous unit, or TORU. The device, located in the Zvezda service module, can send commands to control approaching Roscosmosí spaceships and be used by cosmonauts to manually guide the vehicles to a docking if necessary.

Meanwhile, NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams are preparing to depart Houston for Kennedy Space Center in Florida ahead of Boeingís Crew Flight Test launch to the International Space Station. The experienced space duo is targeted to launch aboard Boeingís Starliner spacecraft atop an Atlas V rocket from United Launch Alliance at 12:25 p.m. on Saturday. They will take a daylong trip around the planet before docking to the Harmony moduleís forward port at 1:50 p.m. on Sunday.

NASA TV will broadcast both missions live on the NASA+ streaming service via the web or the NASA app. Launch and docking coverage also will air live on NASA Television, YouTube, and on the agencyís website. Learn how to stream NASA TV through a variety of platforms including social media.

Back in space, NASA Flight Engineer Tracy C. Dyson spent her day inspecting a treadmill and finalizing spacesuit work. She took turns with fellow NASA astronaut Jeanette Epps checking and cleaning components on the Tranquility moduleís treadmill and photographing the condition of the exercise device for analysis. Next, Dyson joined NASA Flight Engineer Matthew Dominick in the Quest airlock and finished cleaning cooling loops inside a pair of spacesuits. Those suits are being readied for a trio of maintenance and science spacewalks planned for June.

NASA astronaut Mike Barratt spent most of his day supporting life science helping doctors understand how weightlessness affects biology. He started his day in the Kibo laboratory module configuring components on biology habitat hardware then installing the advanced gear on an artificial gravity generating incubator. Afterward, he participated in a vision test using a standard eye chart along with Dominick and Epps.

In the Roscosmos segment of the station, Kononenko and Chub worked on a pair of different experiments before their Progress 88 training session. Kononenko explored futuristic piloting techniques on a computer as Chub attached sensors to himself monitoring his heart activity and blood pressure. Flight Engineer Alexander Grebenkin started his day collecting station air samples for analysis before spending the rest of his shift on life support maintenance tasks.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2024/05/28/cargo-ship-departs-two-rockets-near-launch-during-busy-day-on-station/

May 28, 2024: International Space Station Configuration. Four spaceships are parked at the space station including the SpaceX Dragon Endeavour spacecraft, Northrop Grummanís Cygnus space freighter, the Soyuz MS-25 crew ship, and the Progress 87 resupply ship.
25
I suspect that SpaceX is ignoring the competition when they set their prices.

Even this milquetoast statement is slanderous to SpaceX.

We can be 100% certain that the competition is not a variable in how SpaceX sets its rideshare prices.  The first reason is logical.  The second and third are empirical.

(1) The competition's prices do not give any useful information to SpaceX.  Rather, factoring in those prices just enters noise into SpaceX's testing of the market.

(2) SpaceX hasn't been sued.  If there was any shred of potential SpaceX anti-competitive behavior, you can be sure that Rocket Lab and others would be in SpaceX's shorts legally.

(3) SpaceX's prices do not resemble the prices that others offer.

We have seen quite a few companies testing new markets without reference to competitors.  Perhaps the most famous is Ford's pricing on its Model T.

Per M.E.T.'s interpretation of antitrust law, setting prices with the specific intent of undercutting competitors is not illegal, thus the lack of legal action against SpaceX does not prove anything regarding how SpaceX sets their prices.
26
I didn't say anything about "illegal" (the question of whether something counts as illegal dumping even if internal costs are so low you're still actually making a profit is separate), but intent: did SpaceX decide to take as much of the business opportunity as possible because it was a good business opportunity, or because doing so would deprive a potential future competitor of funds and ensure they die on the vine before growing big enough to become an actual competitor? And yes, the answer can be "both."

If I was Elon, then definitely both. Again, if you can do that while still making a profit, then NOT doing it is just bad business. Should you charge artificially inflated prices just to ensure competitors get a slice of the pie? Of course not.

Pushing rivals into bankruptcy is surely a key part of successful business practice.

So ultimately, I don't think you actually disagree with Peter Beck about what SpaceX did. You just believe that it was appropriate for them to do so, and instead of complaining about it to the media, Beck should just lay down and die.

Uh, no. Beck should compete with his competitors. I have not dug down into SpaceX/Rocket Lab pricing, but IF SpaceX prices  are 1/6th of what Rocket Lab gets(as cited above), and IF SpaceX makes money on them, then Rocket Lab will go out of business.

Beck has yawed around with claims SpaceX couldnít beat individual launches, reuse wasnít economic, etc etc. Itís business, not charity. Pay attention to what Stoke is doing. Complaining ainít gonna fix Beckís problems.
27
ISS Section / Re: Expedition 71 thread
« Last post by Yellowstone10 on Today at 05:53 pm »
SSRMS has stowed Dextre back onto the MBS. (I'm not sure exactly when it picked it up, to be honest - last SSRMS activity covered in this thread was a few weeks ago when it was inspecting the Node 2 Forward IDA docking surface.)
28
Crosspost, click through to original thread for the YT video link:

Very cool, the Dragon parachute panel from DM-2 is in Steve Jurvetsonís collection. More views and discussion at beginning of above video.
29
Rocket Lab / Re: Rocket Lab Neutron rocket - Discussion
« Last post by Yggdrasill on Today at 05:52 pm »
And that if we're counting Goddard, we should count Rocket Lab's Ātea and Instant Eyes programs.
I wouldn't give a lot of weight to hybrid and solid rocket motors. They're not engines.
30
Very cool, the Dragon parachute panel from DM-2 is in Steve Jurvetsonís collection. More views and discussion at beginning of above video.
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