Author Topic: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET September 2024  (Read 2914 times)

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET September 2024
« on: 12/04/2023 08:14 am »
https://twitter.com/andrewparsonson/status/1731601238297374968

Quote
Italian rocket maker Avio has lost two propellant tanks that were to be used for the final Vega flight in 2024. The company is currently exploring its options.
Article:

https://europeanspaceflight.com/the-case-of-the-missing-vega-avum-propellant-tanks/

To lose one propellant tank may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose two looks like ….
« Last Edit: 12/17/2023 10:46 am by Galactic Penguin SST »

Offline eeergo

Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #1 on: 12/04/2023 10:24 am »
Quote
Italian rocket maker Avio has lost two propellant tanks that were to be used for the final Vega flight in 2024. The company is currently exploring its options.
Article:

https://europeanspaceflight.com/the-case-of-the-missing-vega-avum-propellant-tanks/

To lose one propellant tank may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose two looks like ….

It's not even just losing:

"
The two propellant tanks that went missing were housed in an Avio production department in Colleferro that had undergone renovation work. At some point following the completion of the renovations, the two tanks were found to be missing.

According to the initial source, the tanks had not been entered into a company-wide asset management system that tracked the location of all vital Avio components. This ensured that the teams tasked with investigating the disappearance had very little to go on when beginning their search for the missing tanks.

Despite the futility of the search, the tanks were eventually found. This was, however, not the good news Avio had hoped for. The tanks are, unfortunately, not in a usable state. They had been crushed and were found alongside metal scraps in a landfill.
"

I just can't.

Probably not straight Avio's fault, given the renovations contractor screwing up by thoroughly smashing the tanks instead of just *asking first* what those funky-looking, pristine metallic spheres were. I mean, even if they weren't/didn't look like flight hardware and didn't show up in inventory, they could well have been a historical artifact or some other ground unit. Unless they did ask and somebody in the company signed them off as fine to scrap, which would be even more damning.

They appear to have been produced in Norway by the way, not in Ukraine (the engine does come from there, and possibly all the propulsion system short of the tanks themselves): https://www.nammo.com/product/aluminium-propellant-tank/ They don't look extremely hard to manufacture, but guess the recertification of the production line may be problematic (or the Norwegian company also scrapped the tooling...)

Seems like using tanks from AVUM+ is being looked at, but they are a different kind so...

"Avio is now looking at modifying the AVUM upper stage for use aboard Vega. This Frankenstein solution, which would use elements of a Vega C AVUM+ stage, would be completely unproven"
« Last Edit: 12/04/2023 10:25 am by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Offline HVM

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Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #2 on: 12/04/2023 12:04 pm »
So how soon we see it top of a Falcon, do you take bets?
[This was about Biomass, before change of payloads]
« Last Edit: 12/17/2023 12:23 pm by HVM »

Online TheKutKu

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Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #3 on: 12/04/2023 02:25 pm »
Quote
Italian rocket maker Avio has lost two propellant tanks that were to be used for the final Vega flight in 2024. The company is currently exploring its options.
Article:

https://europeanspaceflight.com/the-case-of-the-missing-vega-avum-propellant-tanks/

To lose one propellant tank may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose two looks like ….

It's not even just losing:

"
The two propellant tanks that went missing were housed in an Avio production department in Colleferro that had undergone renovation work. At some point following the completion of the renovations, the two tanks were found to be missing.

According to the initial source, the tanks had not been entered into a company-wide asset management system that tracked the location of all vital Avio components. This ensured that the teams tasked with investigating the disappearance had very little to go on when beginning their search for the missing tanks.

Despite the futility of the search, the tanks were eventually found. This was, however, not the good news Avio had hoped for. The tanks are, unfortunately, not in a usable state. They had been crushed and were found alongside metal scraps in a landfill.
"

I just can't.

Probably not straight Avio's fault, given the renovations contractor screwing up by thoroughly smashing the tanks instead of just *asking first* what those funky-looking, pristine metallic spheres were. I mean, even if they weren't/didn't look like flight hardware and didn't show up in inventory, they could well have been a historical artifact or some other ground unit. Unless they did ask and somebody in the company signed them off as fine to scrap, which would be even more damning.

They appear to have been produced in Norway by the way, not in Ukraine (the engine does come from there, and possibly all the propulsion system short of the tanks themselves): https://www.nammo.com/product/aluminium-propellant-tank/ They don't look extremely hard to manufacture, but guess the recertification of the production line may be problematic (or the Norwegian company also scrapped the tooling...)

Seems like using tanks from AVUM+ is being looked at, but they are a different kind so...

"Avio is now looking at modifying the AVUM upper stage for use aboard Vega. This Frankenstein solution, which would use elements of a Vega C AVUM+ stage, would be completely unproven"

The AVUM *propellant* tanks are made by NPO lavochkin’s babakin division in Khimki, Moscow oblast

https://www.frstrategie.org/publications/notes/premier-bilan-consequences-guerre-ukraine-sur-liens-europe-avec-ukraine-russie-dans-spatial-2022
https://www.opex360.com/2022/03/04/faute-de-lanceur-soyouz-la-mise-sur-orbite-du-satellite-militaire-francais-cso-3-sera-retardee-dun-an/
https://www.laspace.ru/upload/iblock/e62/e6220f025a18af17b2f38af342912921.pdf
« Last Edit: 12/04/2023 02:30 pm by TheKutKu »

Offline eeergo

Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #4 on: 12/04/2023 03:15 pm »
That's right, I read it as if the Norwegian company made them already, but they were in development at the time of that writing. However, the article you linked from last year states ArianeGroup *can* manufacture them (whether through that company or separately isn't clear). Wonder if it's no longer the case, or was deemed unnecessary.

Seems there are four qualification tanks at hand though, so the only alternative is not just the Franken-AVUM with AVUM+ spares as the opening article states.
-DaviD-

Online TheKutKu

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Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #5 on: 12/04/2023 08:07 pm »
That's right, I read it as if the Norwegian company made them already, but they were in development at the time of that writing. However, the article you linked from last year states ArianeGroup *can* manufacture them (whether through that company or separately isn't clear). Wonder if it's no longer the case, or was deemed unnecessary.

Seems there are four qualification tanks at hand though, so the only alternative is not just the Franken-AVUM with AVUM+ spares as the opening article states.

I believe that the Nammo propellant tanks you mentionned were for the RCS (RACS) system

https://www.ecosimpro.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/SP2020_363_Haemmerli.pdf
https://www.nammo.com/product/aluminium-propellant-tank/

compare the Characteristics, these H2O2 tanks are much smaller than the Propellant and Gas tanks, with 45 L capacity vs 180L for the Avum+ (LPS) Titanium propellant tanks (which are made by Arianegroup for Vega-C's Avum+)


https://www.space-propulsion.com/brochures/propellant-tanks/180lt-mon-mmh-tank-dt180.pdf


Offline woods170

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Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #6 on: 12/05/2023 08:36 am »
Quote
Italian rocket maker Avio has lost two propellant tanks that were to be used for the final Vega flight in 2024. The company is currently exploring its options.
Article:

https://europeanspaceflight.com/the-case-of-the-missing-vega-avum-propellant-tanks/

To lose one propellant tank may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose two looks like ….

It's not even just losing:

"
The two propellant tanks that went missing were housed in an Avio production department in Colleferro that had undergone renovation work. At some point following the completion of the renovations, the two tanks were found to be missing.

According to the initial source, the tanks had not been entered into a company-wide asset management system that tracked the location of all vital Avio components. This ensured that the teams tasked with investigating the disappearance had very little to go on when beginning their search for the missing tanks.

Despite the futility of the search, the tanks were eventually found. This was, however, not the good news Avio had hoped for. The tanks are, unfortunately, not in a usable state. They had been crushed and were found alongside metal scraps in a landfill.
"

I just can't.

Probably not straight Avio's fault...

Wrong. It is straight Avio's fault.

After Andrew's story broke yesterday I contacted a source in the Italian aerospace industry. This person confirmed that Avio employees did indeed neglect to timely enter multiple AVUM propellant tanks in the company asset tracking system. What's worse: the supervisors didn't notice the oversight either, until it was too late. Worst of all: I was told that this incident is not unique. Not correctly tracking company assets happens regularly at Avio.
« Last Edit: 12/05/2023 08:37 am by woods170 »

Offline hoku

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Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #7 on: 12/05/2023 08:56 am »
"DIO MIO — What happens in Vega didn’t stay in Vega, as key rocket parts went missing"

Eric Berger's take on this
https://arstechnica.com/space/2023/12/italian-rocket-maker-has-a-problem-key-parts-of-final-vega-booster-were-trashed/

Offline eeergo

Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #8 on: 12/05/2023 09:24 am »
Wrong. It is straight Avio's fault.

After Andrew's story broke yesterday I contacted a source in the Italian aerospace industry. This person confirmed that Avio employees did indeed neglect to timely enter multiple AVUM propellant tanks in the company asset tracking system. What's worse: the supervisors didn't notice the oversight either, until it was too late. Worst of all: I was told that this incident is not unique. Not correctly tracking company assets happens regularly at Avio.

The second part of the statement you trimmed for *reasons*, even while keeping other irrelevant parts of the quote, actually explains why I surmised it was not "JUST straight Avio's fault": no matter how negligent the company was regarding its inventory, or the supervisors sleeping a nap on their shift, or the incident happening before (all of which is obviously damning in its own right)...

it still doesn't detract from the fact that the renovations contractor SHOULD HAVE, and could easily have, just asked whether those unaccounted-for shiny, new, funny-looking balls with cyrillic writing on them were to be actually removed, flattened and scrapped. Barring sabotage or, in that case true straight malfaisance/criminal negligence, nobody would have signed off on that operation once heads had been raised up.

If I make home renovations in my house and tell the workers to throw away trash they find, keeping an eye out for my belongings listed on a piece of paper, yet I forgot to list not an obscure document hidden in a cabinet or a hair lock from my first girlfriend tucked away in a yellowed envelope on a table, but the XIX-century carillon clock in full display in the middle of the living room, or the ultra-HD 4K full-wall TV next to it... it's not unreasonable to place at least part of the blame on them, for just throwing the items out of the window while shying away from criticism cause they were "not on the list".
-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #9 on: 12/05/2023 09:32 am »
That's right, I read it as if the Norwegian company made them already, but they were in development at the time of that writing. However, the article you linked from last year states ArianeGroup *can* manufacture them (whether through that company or separately isn't clear). Wonder if it's no longer the case, or was deemed unnecessary.

Seems there are four qualification tanks at hand though, so the only alternative is not just the Franken-AVUM with AVUM+ spares as the opening article states.

I believe that the Nammo propellant tanks you mentionned were for the RCS (RACS) system

https://www.ecosimpro.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/SP2020_363_Haemmerli.pdf
https://www.nammo.com/product/aluminium-propellant-tank/

compare the Characteristics, these H2O2 tanks are much smaller than the Propellant and Gas tanks, with 45 L capacity vs 180L for the Avum+ (LPS) Titanium propellant tanks (which are made by Arianegroup for Vega-C's Avum+)


https://www.space-propulsion.com/brochures/propellant-tanks/180lt-mon-mmh-tank-dt180.pdf



Might be, thanks for looking into that!
-DaviD-

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #10 on: 12/05/2023 01:54 pm »
Sentinel-2C

Cross-post:

Airbus completes integration of 3rd Copernicus Sentinel-2

Climate satellite will now undergo extensive testing

Friedrichshafen, 29 July 2021 – Airbus has finished the integration of the Copernicus Sentinel-2C satellite. It is the third of its kind and will now be shipped to Munich to undergo extensive environmental tests to prove its readiness for space. The test campaign will last until March 2022.

The data gathered by Sentinel-2 satellites are used for monitoring land use and changes, soil sealing, land management, agriculture, forestry, natural disasters (floods, forest fires, landslides and erosion) and to assist humanitarian aid missions. Environmental observation in coastal areas likewise forms part of these activities, as does glacier, ice and snow monitoring.

Offering "colour vision" for the Copernicus programme, Sentinel-2C – like its precursor satellites Sentinel-2A and -2B – will deliver optical images from the visible to short-wave infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum. From an altitude of 786 kilometres, the 1.1 ton “C” satellite will enable continuation of imaging in 13 spectral bands with a resolution of 10, 20 or 60 metres and a uniquely large swath width of 290 km.

The telescope structure and the mirrors are made of silicon carbide, first pioneered by Airbus to provide very high optical stability and minimize thermo-elastic deformation, resulting in an excellent geometric image quality. This is unprecedented in this category of optical imagers. Each Sentinel-2 satellite collects 1.5 terabytes per day, after on-board compression. The data is formatted at high speed and temporarily stored on board in the highest capacity Mass Memory and Formatting unit currently flying in space. Data recording and laser-enabled downlink can take place simultaneously at high speed via the EDRS SpaceDataHighway, in addition to the direct X-band link to the ground stations.

The Sentinel-2-mission is based on a constellation of two identical satellites, Sentinel-2A (launched 2015) and Sentinel-2B (launched 2017), flying in the same orbit but 180° apart for optimal coverage and revisit time. The satellites orbit the Earth every 100 minutes covering all Earth’s land surfaces, large islands, inland and coastal waters every five days.

The Sentinel-2 satellites are currently sensing systematically all land and water areas, producing excellent results. Last year, the Sentinel-2 mission remained the top European mission in terms of peer-reviewed scientific publications (1200 during 2020) and data volume distributed to users.

The Sentinel-2 mission has been made possible thanks to the close collaboration between ESA, the European Commission, industry, service providers and data users. Its development has involved around 60 companies, led by Airbus Defence and Space in Germany for the satellites and Airbus Defence and Space in France for the multispectral instruments, while Airbus Defence and Space in Spain is responsible for the mechanical satellite structure.

Copernicus, Europe’s environmental monitoring programme, is led by the European Commission (EC) in partnership with the European Space Agency (ESA). The Copernicus Sentinels supply remote sensing data of the Earth, delivering key operational services related to environment and security.

Gearing up for third Sentinel-2 satellite
09/08/2021

With the first Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite in orbit since 2015 and the second since 2017, engineers are busy preparing the mission’s follow-on pair to eventually pick up the baton to supply images for a myriad of applications from food security to monitoring the decline of Earth’s ice. Slated for launch at the beginning of 2024, Sentinel-2C has just started a punishing five-month testing programme to ensure that it is fit for its life in space.

The Sentinel-2 satellites each carry an innovative high-resolution multispectral imager, which combined with their 290 km-wide swath and frequent revisit times, offer unprecedented views of Earth.

The mission provides information mainly for agricultural practices and for tackling the global issue of food security. Images can be used to determine leaf area chlorophyll and water content indexes, for example. These data are particularly important for effective yield prediction and applications related to Earth’s vegetation.

However, over the last six years, the mission’s data have also been used to monitor changes in ice sheets and glaciers, coastal erosion, deforestation, burnt land resulting from wildfires, pollution in lakes and coastal waters, and more.

The mission is based on a constellation of two identical satellites in the same orbit, 180° apart for optimal coverage and data delivery. So, when Sentinel-2A retires, Sentinel-2C will be there to take its place, and eventually Sentinel-2D will replace Sentinel-2B.

This pairing guarantees the continuation of data delivery that many Copernicus Services users now rely.

With such an important career ahead, it is essential that the next Sentinel-2 satellite to launch, Sentinel-2C, is thoroughly tested. Engineers at Airbus Defence and Space in Friedrichshafen, Germany, have spent the last four months completing the build-up of the satellite by integrating its all-important multispectral imager instrument, and have now transported it to IABG’s facilities in Ottobrunn. Given the restrictions that the Covid pandemic has imposed this has been no easy matter.

Constantin Mavrocordatos, ESA’s Copernicus Sentinel-2 project manager said, “We are thrilled that Sentinel-2C is now ready to be fully tested. Airbus has done a spectacular job fitting the whole satellite out, especially during these difficult Covid times, which has led to some different ways of working to ensure all the restrictions are respected.

“The satellite arrived safely in IABG where it was unpacked, checked that all is well after its short road trip from Friedrichshafen and was installed in the cleanroom for series of exhaustive tests that will run until Christmas.”

The programme includes a range of mechanical tests that simulate the noise and vibrations of liftoff, tests that check that the satellite deploys its solar wing correctly, other tests that place the satellite under the extreme temperature swings it will experience in space, and electromagnetic compatibility tests to measure radio frequency radiation levels generated by the satellite and to verify the correct operation of the satellite equipment under this environment.

Once all this has been completed, Sentinel-2C will be transported back to Friedrichshafen for some final checks before being placed in storage to wait until it is time to ship it to the launch site in French Guiana. Liftoff is envisaged to take place in early 2024.

https://www.esa.int/Applications/Observing_the_Earth/Copernicus/Sentinel-2/Gearing_up_for_third_Sentinel-2_satellite

https://www.airbus.com/en/newsroom/news/2023-03-three-sleeping-beauties-await-their-turn-in-orbit

Quote
Three ‘sleeping beauties’ await their turn in orbit

Copernicus Sentinel climate satellites 2C, 2D and 6B have been finalised and are being safely stored in special tents awaiting their turn in orbit. These tents meet very strict storage requirements, specifically long term accumulation of humidity and will ensure the satellites are kept clean until each is required to travel to its launch site.

The Sentinel satellites power Europe’s Copernicus programme, the world’s largest single programme for observing and monitoring the Earth. The first Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite was launched in 2015 and the second in 2017, supplying images for a myriad of applications from food security to monitoring the shrinking ice caps, with the next pair (2C and 2D) set to follow when required.

Albert Zaglauer, head of Earth Observation Systems, says: “The work of Europe's Copernicus programme is vital. It monitors our planet’s health for the cost of just one cup of coffee per citizen per year.”

Sentinel-2C, is currently set for launch in 2024. The exact launch date will be decided by ESA and the European Union depending on several variables, one being the end of life of Sentinel-2A. Sentinel-2D is fully integrated and functionally tested. The next step will be the environmental test campaign, which will begin when more information is available about the launch date for Sentinel-2C and the end of life of Sentinel-2B.

The data gathered by Sentinel-2 satellites are used for monitoring land use and changes, soil sealing, land management, agriculture, forestry, natural disasters (floods, forest fires, landslides and erosion) and to assist humanitarian aid missions. Environmental observation in coastal areas likewise forms part of these activities, as does glacier, ice and snow monitoring. The telescope structure and the mirrors are made of silicon carbide, first pioneered by Airbus to provide very high optical stability and minimise thermo-elastic deformation, resulting in an excellent geometric image quality. This is unprecedented in this category of optical imagers.

Sentinel-6B, will continue the vital work of Sentinel-6A, launched in 2020 to monitor our oceans. The satellite, which includes European and US instruments, successfully completed its environmental test campaign last year. There is a second round of environmental tests foreseen before launch. ESA/NASA plan to launch Sentinel-6B in late 2025 and then to initiate a one-year handover with the first Sentinel-6A “Michael Freilich” satellite which has been successfully operating in orbit since the end of 2020.

The Copernicus Sentinel-6 will carry out high-precision measurements of ocean surface topography. Sentinel-6 measures its distance to the ocean surface with an accuracy of a few centimetres and uses this data to map it, repeating the cycle every 10 days, with the mission lasting up to seven years. It documents changes in sea-surface height, records and analyses variations in sea levels and observes ocean currents. Global sea levels are currently rising by an average of 3.3 millimetres a year as a result of global warming; this could potentially have dramatic consequences for countries with densely populated coastal areas.  Each satellite carries a radar altimeter, which works by measuring the time it takes for radar pulses to travel to the surface and back again to the satellite. Combined with precise satellite location data, altimetry measurements yield the height of the sea surface. The satellites’ instrument package also includes an advanced microwave radiometer that accounts for the amount of water vapour in the atmosphere, which affects the speed of the altimeter’s radar pulses.

Until they are called into action, the spacecraft will remain in hibernation, protected against any external disturbance.

Airbus has played a crucial role in constructing the satellites and instruments for Copernicus since the start of the programme in 1998, contributing its environmental expertise to all six Sentinel satellite missions and the new Copernicus next generation satellites: CRISTAL, LSTM, and ROSE-L missions.

Sentinel satellites are part of Copernicus, Europe’s environmental monitoring programme, which is led by the European Commission (EC) in partnership with the European Space Agency (ESA). The Copernicus Sentinels supply remote sensing data of the Earth, delivering key operational services related to environment and security.

For more information on the Copernicus satellites:

https://www.airbus.com/en/products-services/space/earth-observation/climate-missions

Photo caption:

Quote
Sentinels 2C, 2D and 6B climate satellites finalised and safely in hibernation
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Online Galactic Penguin SST

Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #11 on: 12/05/2023 02:00 pm »
As it turns out, the problems above with the very last "classical Vega" launcher left is affecting the launch of Sentinel-2C instead of Biomass:

https://twitter.com/AndrewParsonson/status/1732043961282466298

Quote
As of late 2022, the final flight of Vega was to have been the European Space Agency’s Biomass forest measuring satellite, the launch contract of which had been signed in October 2019. However, in early 2023, the agency began to consider that the launch of its Sentinel 2C Earth observation mission was more urgent. The decision to swap out Biomass for Sentinel 2C was officially made during the summer. The contract to build Sentinel 2C and 2D was awarded to Airbus Defence and Space in January 2016. The contract was worth more than €280 million.
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Offline woods170

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Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #12 on: 12/06/2023 12:43 pm »
Wrong. It is straight Avio's fault.

After Andrew's story broke yesterday I contacted a source in the Italian aerospace industry. This person confirmed that Avio employees did indeed neglect to timely enter multiple AVUM propellant tanks in the company asset tracking system. What's worse: the supervisors didn't notice the oversight either, until it was too late. Worst of all: I was told that this incident is not unique. Not correctly tracking company assets happens regularly at Avio.

The second part of the statement you trimmed for *reasons*, even while keeping other irrelevant parts of the quote, actually explains why I surmised it was not "JUST straight Avio's fault": no matter how negligent the company was regarding its inventory, or the supervisors sleeping a nap on their shift, or the incident happening before (all of which is obviously damning in its own right)...

it still doesn't detract from the fact that the renovations contractor SHOULD HAVE, and could easily have, just asked whether those unaccounted-for shiny, new, funny-looking balls with cyrillic writing on them were to be actually removed, flattened and scrapped.

Who says that the renovations contractor didn't ask? You're assuming here that if the renovations contractor had asked, someone at Avio would have told them not to touch those tanks.
But given the incompetence of at least 4 employees at that particular part of Avio, I would not be surprised to learn that the renovations contractor DID in fact ask about those "shiny, new, funny-looking balls", and was told he could dispose of them.

There are, afterall, several people working at Avio who don't do their jobs right. At least two people failed to enter those tanks in the company asset tracking system. And at least two other people failed to notice this during their duties as supervisors.

One employee not doing stuff according to rules, regulations and processes is quite possible. Two doing so is already less likely. Three is even more unlikely. Four of those, all working in the same department, points to a systemic issue.
« Last Edit: 12/06/2023 12:51 pm by woods170 »

Offline GWR64

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Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #13 on: 12/08/2023 01:48 pm »
...

compare the Characteristics, these H2O2 tanks are much smaller than the Propellant and Gas tanks, with 45 L capacity vs 180L for the Avum+ (LPS) Titanium propellant tanks (which are made by Arianegroup for Vega-C's Avum+)


https://www.space-propulsion.com/brochures/propellant-tanks/180lt-mon-mmh-tank-dt180.pdf

Somewhat confusingly, the shell of Arianegroup's Vega-C tanks are made of an aluminum alloy.
Only the ports at the top and bottom are made of an titanium alloy. It's in the linked pdf.

The Vega tanks from Russia are made entirely of an titanium alloy. (I believe)
https://www.esa.int/ESA_Multimedia/Images/2020/03/Vega_s_top_tank
« Last Edit: 12/08/2023 02:16 pm by GWR64 »

Online matthewkantar

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Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #14 on: 12/10/2023 07:54 pm »
One thing feels fishy about this tale of woe. I work in the States, so things may be different in the EU, and it’s been a loooong time since I’ve seen a contractor put AL or CU scrap in a dumpster/landfill. That stuff gets scrapped.

Offline HVM

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Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #15 on: 12/14/2023 01:29 pm »
https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1735295501023482168
"From the ESA Council media briefing that just concluded: the next Vega (not Vega C) launch has slipped to September 2024 to accommodate a workaround for lost AVUM tanks. Also, Biomass has been taken off that launch; its launch plans are TBD."
« Last Edit: 12/14/2023 01:29 pm by HVM »

Offline GWR64

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Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET Q2 2024
« Reply #16 on: 12/17/2023 10:41 am »
One thing feels fishy about this tale of woe. I work in the States, so things may be different in the EU, and it’s been a loooong time since I’ve seen a contractor put AL or CU scrap in a dumpster/landfill. That stuff gets scrapped.

This is no different in Germany. At least no one throws away copper scrap. This is titanium. I don't know the price, probably higher than that of copper. But a reputable scrap dealer would require the ID. Maybe the person got cold feet.
Toni Tolker-Nielsen said that the tanks were stolen.

Either way, it raises questions about the security at Avio. A company that produces rockets and military technology.
Why were the stolen tanks lying around somewhere and not in a storage with the other two?
Why wasn't the area inspected before the renovation work? How was the work monitored?
How are the vehicles inspected when they leave the factory?
« Last Edit: 12/17/2023 10:44 am by GWR64 »

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Re: Vega VV24 - Sentinel-2C - NET September 2024
« Reply #17 on: 12/20/2023 10:56 am »
The eye glaring reports on this isn't stopping just yet, even ESA seems to be amiss:

https://twitter.com/AndrewParsonson/status/1737437957999518062
Astronomy & spaceflight geek penguin. In a relationship w/ Space Shuttle Discovery. Current Priority: Chasing the Chinese Spaceflight Wonder Egg & A Certain Chinese Mars Rover

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