Author Topic: Ariane 5 VA261 - Syracuse 4B & Heinrich Hertz - 5 July 2023 (22:00 UTC)  (Read 36302 times)

Offline GWR64

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Heinrich Hertz as the smaller and lighter satellite took the upper slot. This is unusual on Ariane 5.
It was apparently launched in place of a larger satellite, Eutelsat-10B.
Actually, Heinrich Hertz was already out of the Ariane 5 calendar due to the delays and was replaced by GSAT-24.
But there must have been something in the 2022 negotiations between Eutelsat and Arianespace about the launch of Eutelsat 10B and the (single) launch of Konnect VHTS. I don't think it was just the time factor.
Originally Eutelsat-10B and Konnect VHTS were at Arianespace booked, probably Hotbird-13F at SpaceX and Hotbird-13G at ILS.
Hotbird-13F wasn't that urgent, maybe could have swapped launcher with Eutelsat-10B.
At the end, SpaceX launched 3 Eutelsat satellites and Arianespace only one. Plus the delays at Ovzon-3.
Anyway, the lucky Heinrich Hertz somehow found a place on the very last Ariane 5.
« Last Edit: 07/08/2023 11:38 am by GWR64 »

Offline Lewis007

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Video of VA261 launch campaign


Offline GWR64

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Despite the bipropellant apogee motor, Heinrich Hertz has probably not yet reached the GEO.
The development of the orbital data is sometimes strange, they also come irregularly, the last ones are already 4 days old. What's going on there?
https://celestrak.org/NORAD/elements/table.php?INTDES=2023-093

Screenshot Celestrak
« Last Edit: 07/29/2023 01:40 pm by GWR64 »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Despite the bipropellant apogee motor, Heinrich Hertz has probably not yet reached the GEO.
The development of the orbital data is sometimes strange, they also come irregularly, the last ones are already 4 days old. What's going on there?

Looks like they reached geosynchronous orbit on 20 July where we can see the SMA is 36,000 km and the eccentricity is zero. It then looks like they then lowered the orbit by about 2000 km and let the spacecraft drift.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline GWR64

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Despite the bipropellant apogee motor, Heinrich Hertz has probably not yet reached the GEO.
The development of the orbital data is sometimes strange, they also come irregularly, the last ones are already 4 days old. What's going on there?

Looks like they reached geosynchronous orbit on 20 July where we can see the SMA is 36,000 km and the eccentricity is zero. It then looks like they then lowered the orbit by about 2000 km and let the spacecraft drift.

Not quite, the maximum was about 35720 km. Go to the relevant day with the mouse.
https://celestrak.org/NORAD/elements/graph-orbit-data.php?CATNR=57213

According to the latest TLE data, H2Sat would now be on the length of Australia and rapidly running to the east around the world. However, we do not know if he has maneuvered again in the last almost 5 days.

Orbital slot should be 17.6 deg E or maybe 0.5 deg E? not quite sure. H2Sat's ITU registration has a history of at least 10 years.
0.5 deg East seems correct now

« Last Edit: 07/30/2023 09:00 am by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

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Finally, H2Sat is geostationary at 0.5 degrees E. As early as July 31, the TLEs were close to this point.
On August 1 and 2, the perigee was suddenly 4000 km! lower. Very doubtful.
The TLEs from July 24 and 25, with low perigee, were also likely wrong.
« Last Edit: 08/05/2023 07:39 am by GWR64 »

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Offline GWR64

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2023-093B    57214    SYRACUSE 4B    848.78 min   2.59 deg.    42,187 km    4,448 km

https://celestrak.org/NORAD/elements/table.php?CATNR=57214

SYRACUSE 4B is the last satellite in the Eurostar 3000 series, which is to be put into operation.
So far, Inmarsat 6F2 is (probably) the only total failure from this series.

« Last Edit: 08/27/2023 12:31 pm by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

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Syracuse 4B reached the GEO. Longitude about 6.4 deg. W.

Source Celestrak.
« Last Edit: 01/14/2024 07:04 pm by GWR64 »

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