Author Topic: OneWeb constellation  (Read 544707 times)

Offline woods170

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1180 on: 04/11/2021 02:17 pm »
So, when it became clear that OneWeb was moving their sat SpaceX disabled the AI collision avoidance system on their sat

OneWeb and SpaceX are able to email each other, it's not like they had to get out telescopes to see what was going on.

I didn't say that.

Something 'becoming clear' usually becomes clear because people talk to each other. Which is exactly what I was getting at.

Once it became clear to SpaceX that OneWeb was moving their sat (because they told SpaceX that they would do so) it was clear to SpaceX that having the Starlink sat move would not be in the best interest of collision avoidance. Which is why SpaceX disabled the AI collision avoidance system on their sat.

Offline Nomadd

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1181 on: 04/11/2021 03:25 pm »
"SpaceX disabled its automated AI-powered collision avoidance system to allow OneWeb to steer its satellite out of the way...  "“What is the point of having it if you have to turn it off when there’s going to be a potential collision?” Victoria Samson of SWF

https://twitter.com/VSamson_DC/status/1381017659865698309

Fine example of someone not understanding that in space, there are no traffic rules (yet). The AI-powered collision avoidance system on Starlink operates on the assumption that the other involved orbiting object remains passive. In other words: the other involved object stays its course and ONLY the Starlink sat steers out of the way.

However, in this case OneWeb itself wanted to actively move their satellite. But given that there is no standard rule with regards to collision avoidance - who moves in what direction - having both objects actively moving might actually result in the objects inadvertantly turning into each other's direction.

So, when it became clear that OneWeb was moving their sat SpaceX disabled the AI collision avoidance system on their sat to prevent an inadvertant collision: by having their Starlink sat 'stay the course'.

As long as binding 'traffic rules' for all participants in (B)LEO spaceflight do not see the light of day, incidents like these will continue to happen.
I don't know if Victoria was asking an honest question, but I see she got some good replies on Twitter.
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Offline Rondaz

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1182 on: 04/11/2021 08:52 pm »
@OneWeb discusses collaboration with @Kazakhstan to include assembly of components for @OneWebSatellit1 at the National Space Center in Nur-Sultan, broadband provision to rural areas as well as a joint venture for a gateway to serve wider Central Asia.

https://twitter.com/Megaconstellati/status/1381318450648338434

Offline Rondaz

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1183 on: 04/11/2021 08:53 pm »
6m after @OneWeb terminates its JV with its Russian partnerGonets(https://twitter.com/Megaconstellati/status/1313496211840696326?s=19) hopes revive that a local mission control centre and 3 local gateways will soothe security concerns and open market access. UT demo in Russia planned in June.

https://twitter.com/Megaconstellati/status/1381325639500894212
« Last Edit: 04/11/2021 08:54 pm by Rondaz »

Offline Pueo

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1184 on: 04/11/2021 09:08 pm »
"SpaceX disabled its automated AI-powered collision avoidance system to allow OneWeb to steer its satellite out of the way...  "“What is the point of having it if you have to turn it off when there’s going to be a potential collision?” Victoria Samson of SWF

https://twitter.com/VSamson_DC/status/1381017659865698309

Fine example of someone not understanding that in space, there are no traffic rules (yet). The AI-powered collision avoidance system on Starlink operates on the assumption that the other involved orbiting object remains passive. In other words: the other involved object stays its course and ONLY the Starlink sat steers out of the way.

However, in this case OneWeb itself wanted to actively move their satellite. But given that there is no standard rule with regards to collision avoidance - who moves in what direction - having both objects actively moving might actually result in the objects inadvertantly turning into each other's direction.

So, when it became clear that OneWeb was moving their sat SpaceX disabled the AI collision avoidance system on their sat to prevent an inadvertant collision: by having their Starlink sat 'stay the course'.

As long as binding 'traffic rules' for all participants in (B)LEO spaceflight do not see the light of day, incidents like these will continue to happen.

I assure you she is aware there are no traffic rules in space, as part of her job is literally trying come up with what those traffic rules could be.  Her point is that because there's no clearinghouse, much less a requirement for satellite operators to inform others of their planned maneuvers whenever there's a conjunction between two active satellites automated collision avoidance systems won't respond as we would like without human intervention.  The current delay between maneuvers and updated TLEs also means that two operators could initiate maneuvers of their satellites in such a way that a conjunction is created that neither's collision avoidance system has the information to recognize.
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Offline DigitalMan

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1185 on: 04/12/2021 12:14 am »
With OneWeb terminating the JV with Gonets, what is the status of Gonets offering service via OneWeb satellites? Will they be expected to buy access or are they SOL?

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1186 on: 04/12/2021 02:22 am »
With OneWeb terminating the JV with Gonets, what is the status of Gonets offering service via OneWeb satellites? Will they be expected to buy access or are they SOL?
AFAIU primary goal by Gonets side was to delay building Gonets-M1 (Gonets-2) constellation
« Last Edit: 04/12/2021 02:22 am by russianhalo117 »

Offline SMS

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« Last Edit: 04/13/2021 05:15 pm by SMS »
---
SMS ;-).

Offline SMS

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1188 on: 04/13/2021 12:33 am »
Is it possible to put in one message all patches pictures from F1 to F6?

Like upper one?

= = =
I have found only these like below:

f6: https://twitter.com/OneWeb/status/1381974500435181570

f5: (better one?)
https://twitter.com/OneWeb/status/1372580874831691778

f4: (twitter link?)

f3: https://twitter.com/OneWeb/status/1239848815231893505

f2: https://twitter.com/UKspace/status/1225764980676579328

f1: (twitter link?)

= = =
Can someone complete missing link or picture, please? Thanks all who helped to complete!
« Last Edit: 04/13/2021 05:15 pm by SMS »
---
SMS ;-).

Offline Rondaz

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1189 on: 04/13/2021 12:43 am »
4 days before Kazakhstan's deal with @OneWeb was announced, the Kazakh Minister of Digital Development, Innovation and Aerospace Industry proposed not to replace the aging KazSat 2 geostationary sat but to partner with @SpaceX, OneWeb &
@SES_Networks.

https://twitter.com/Megaconstellati/status/1381716040862797831

Offline Rondaz

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1190 on: 04/14/2021 12:29 pm »
Refueling of the Fregat upper stage completed at Vostochny

04/14/2021 13:05

In accordance with the comprehensive launch preparation schedule for 36 OneWeb spacecraft using the Soyuz-2.1b launch vehicle and the Fregat upper stage, specialists from the Vostochny Space Center (a branch of the Center for Operation of Ground Space Infrastructure Facilities) and the Research and Production Association named after S.A. Lavochkin (part of the State Corporation "Roscosmos") at the Vostochny cosmodrome transported the upper stage "Fregat" from the refueling hall of the refueling and neutralization station to the assembly and testing building of spacecraft.

The upper stage for the development and production of NPO Lavochkin is filled with propellants and installed in the stand before the assembly of the space warhead begins. The final operation is the general assembly of the Soyuz-2.1b space rocket, which specialists from the Russian rocket and space industry plan to start on April 20, 2021.

This launch will be the third fully commercial from the Vostochny cosmodrome, implemented by Arianespace for OneWeb from this cosmodrome. Glavkosmos (a subsidiary of the Roscosmos State Corporation) is responsible for launching OneWeb vehicles using Soyuz-2 launch vehicles under contracts with the French company Arianespace and the Russian-French Starsem.

https://www.roscosmos.ru/30749/

Offline Rondaz

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1191 on: 04/14/2021 07:10 pm »
Things are continuing to ramp up in Vostochny as we prepare for our 6th launch, where the team have just finished integrating all of the 36 satellites onto the dispenser Satellite

Keep your eyes peeled for the next steps as we draw closer to lift-off.

https://twitter.com/OneWeb/status/1382408868496617476

Offline Rondaz

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1192 on: 04/16/2021 08:03 pm »
Nothing would be possible without our incredible launch teams who are working hard on our 6th #Oneweblaunch.

This will be the first back to back launch for our teams - a massive thank you to everyone working tirelessly to complete all the preparations!

https://twitter.com/OneWeb/status/1383133740868714497

Offline Rondaz

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1193 on: 04/19/2021 06:11 pm »
Looking forward to our next launch on 25th April UTC / 26th April DST..

https://twitter.com/OneWeb/status/1384166044562952195

Offline Rondaz

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1194 on: 04/19/2021 06:12 pm »
Arianspace announces @OneWeb's sixth launch is scheduled for April 26:

A Soyuz rocket will carry another 36 OneWeb satellites into orbit, to bring the constellation's total to 182 satellites.

https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/status/1384137806922932240

Offline Rondaz

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1195 on: 04/19/2021 06:13 pm »
Get ready for our 6th #OneWeb Launch  from Vostochny is scheduled for 25th April 10:14PM (UTC) / 06:14PM (ET). Keep your eyes peeled for news and updates as we draw closer to launch, and make sure to set your reminders for our live-stream on the day.

https://twitter.com/OneWeb/status/1384200440313569280

Offline Rondaz

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1196 on: 04/20/2021 11:48 am »
The general assembly of the Soyuz-2.1b ILV with 36 OneWeb spacecraft has been completed

04/20/2021 14:34

In the assembly and test building of the Vostochny cosmodrome, a joint crew of specialists from subsidiaries of the State Corporation Roscosmos - the Vostochny Space Center (a branch of the Center for Operation of Ground-Based Space Infrastructure Facilities) and the Progress Rocket and Space Center - completed the general assembly of the Soyuz-2.1 space rocket b ".

In accordance with the prelaunch work schedule, the spacecraft (upper stage "Fregat" and 36 new OneWeb spacecraft under the fairing) and the third stage with the "package" (including the first and second stages) of the launch vehicle were docked. After completion of the mechanical docking, the electrical connections were assembled and the piping for temperature control was installed. Currently, a space rocket is installed on a transport and installation unit.

The launch of a new batch of 36 OneWeb spacecraft is scheduled for April 26, 2021. It will be the third fully commercial from the Vostochny cosmodrome, implemented by the French company Arianespace for OneWeb from the Russian cosmodrome.

https://www.roscosmos.ru/30811/

Offline Rekt1971

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1197 on: 04/20/2021 11:36 pm »
Reposting here

Well, the recent encounter between Starlink and OneWeb satellites just got more interesting.

Basically, the two companies had a conference call where they discussed the physical coordination of the satellites which was successful and there was never a risk of collision.

SpaceX also states that OneWeb explicitly requested SpaceX to turn off their autonomous collision avoidance system.
Additionally, the document states that even if there had not been any maneuver conducted, the satellites would have not collided.

In the rest of the document, SpaceX trashes OneWeb.

https://licensing.fcc.gov/myibfs/download.do?attachment_key=6212177

Offline snotis

Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1198 on: 04/21/2021 12:19 am »
Cross-post:

From recent FCC document about recent SpaceX and OneWeb collision mitigation:

https://licensing.fcc.gov/myibfs/download.do?attachment_key=6212177

Quote
SpaceX presented the attached fact sheet with an accurate chronology of events that demonstrates the coordination was successful and there was never a risk of a collision.
Despite recent reports to the contrary, the parties made clear that there was no "close call" or "near miss." SpaceX and OneWeb agreed that they had conducted a successful coordination, resulting in a positive outcome. The probability of collision never exceeded the threshold for a maneuver, and the satellites would not have collided even if no maneuver had been conducted. As further detailed in the attached fact sheet, and despite OneWeb's previous public claims, SpaceX's autonomous collision avoidance system was and remains fully functional at all times. SpaceX only turned off the capability at OneWeb's explicit request after OneWeb decided to conduct a maneuver.

 .

Quote
OneWeb 's misleading public statements coincide with OneWeb's intensified efforts to prevent SpaceX from completing a safety upgrade to its system. For instance, immediately after the first inaccurate quotes came out in media accounts, OneWeb met with Commission staff and Commissioners demanding unilateral conditions placed on SpaceX’s operations. Ironically, the conditions demanded by OneWeb would make it more difficult to successfully coordinate operations going forward, demonstrating more of a concern with limiting competitors than with a genuine concern for space safety.

 .

Quote
• the maneuver threshold for Starlink satellites is 1e-5 and that maneuvers occur approximately 12 hours before the predicted closest approach of the satellites
• if a maneuver was needed, typically a single in-track burn would be conducted to reduce collision probability.
• OneWeb acknowledged that the covariance (i.e., accuracy) in its propagated ephemerides (i.e., predicted location of satellites) are biased low and this bias is a known issue.

 .

Quote
• SpaceX reiterated its recommendation to wait for another CDM from 18 SPCS before planning a maneuver because SpaceX systems indicated this was the least risky approach.
• OneWeb satellites need more time to coordinate and plan their maneuvers than Starlink satellites require, so OneWeb did not want to wait and chose instead to maneuver OneWeb-0178.
• Because OneWeb decided to plan a maneuver, it asked SpaceX to turn off Starlink-1546’s autonomous conjunction avoidance system. SpaceX obliged this request and confirmed to OneWeb
that the system had been turned off.

 .

Quote
• 18 SPCS reported actual miss distance as 1,120 m.
• LeoLabs reported actual miss distance as 1,072 m.
• Both 18 SPCS and LeoLabs reported final Pc below 1e-20—one in one hundred million million million—this was not a close call or a near miss

Offline Rondaz

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Re: OneWeb constellation
« Reply #1199 on: 04/21/2021 09:52 am »
Five days before the launch of OneWeb spacecraft from Vostochny

04/21/2021 12:15

At the Vostochny cosmodrome in the Amur Region, a meeting of the State Commission for flight tests of space complexes for socio-economic, scientific and commercial purposes was held on readiness for transport to the launch complex and work on preparation for the launch of the Soyuz-2.1b carrier rocket under the OneWeb program (mission No. 45) in accordance with the pre-launch schedule.

Based on the results of reports on the preparation of the rocket and ground infrastructure, the members of the State Commission decided to remove the space rocket from the assembly and test building and install it in a vertical position at the launch complex on April 22, 2021. The start of work on transportation to the launch site is scheduled at 01:00 Moscow time (07:00 local time), after which specialists from subsidiaries of the State Corporation Roscosmos will begin work on the schedule of the first launch day. Today, preparations are underway at the launch site to receive a space rocket.

The launch of the Soyuz-2.1b carrier rocket with the Fregat upper stage and a batch of 36 spacecraft from the OneWeb satellite company is scheduled for April 26, 2021 at 01:14 Moscow time. This will be the third fully commercial launch from the Vostochny cosmodrome, implemented by the French company Arianespace for OneWeb from this cosmodrome.

https://www.roscosmos.ru/30820/

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