Author Topic: Galileo Deployment  (Read 83548 times)

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Galileo Deployment
« on: 11/02/2013 04:26 pm »
I've been looking into a consolidated Galileo launch sechedule. I've arrange this list.
I took this from the Arianespace manifest on this site. Apparently for 2014 they might be able to launch three Soyuz missions, but that depends on payload and rocket readiness. The first flight of 2014 appears on track since the payloads are waiting for the O3b launch. But the third flight seems very difficult, among other issues because of rocket availability. The Ariane 5 ES flights don't seem to have slots since Ariane 5 ECA has a very busy schedule. So it would seem to push most deployment into 2015 and 2016.
 

№ – Date - Satellite(s) - Orbital Plane - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)
01 - 2005-12-28 - GIOVE A - Test plane - Soyuz-FG/Fregat (ST-15) - Baikonur 31/6 - 05:19:08 (retired to graveyard orbit in June 2012)
02 - 2008-04-26 - GIOVE B - Test plane - Soyuz-FG/Fregat (ST-21) - Baikonur 31/6 - 22:16:02 (retired to graveyard orbit in July 2012)
03 - 2011-10-21 - Galileo-IOV PFM (Thijs)/Galileo-IOV FM2 (Natalia) - B plane  - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS0) - Kourou ELS - 10:30:26
04 - 2012-10-12 - Galileo-IOV FM3 (David)/Galileo-IOV FM4 (Sif) - C plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS03) -  Kourou ELS - 18:15:01
05 - 2014-08-22 - Galileo-FOC M01 FM01 (Doresa) / FM02 (Milena) - C Plane -  Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS09) - Kourou ELS (Launch Failure: Wrong Orbit)
06 - 2015-03-27 - Galileo-FOC M02 FM03 (Adam) / FM04 (Anastasia) - B Plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS11) - Kourou ELS - 21:46:18.522
07 - 2015-09-11 - Galileo-FOC M03 FM05 (Alba) / FM06 (Oriana) - A Plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS12)- Kourou ELS - 02:08:12
08 - 2015-12-17 - Galileo-FOC M04 FM08 (Andriana) / FM09 (Liene) - C Plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS13) -  Kourou ELS - 11:51:56
09 - 2016-05-24 - Galileo-FOC M05 FM10 (Danielè) / FM11 (Alizée) - A Plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS15) -  Kourou ELS - 08:48:43
10 - 2016-11-17 - Galileo-FOC M06 FM07 (Antonianna)/FM12 (Lisa)/FM13 (Kimberley)/FM14 (Tijmen) - C Plane - Ariane 5 ES (VA234) - Kourou ELA-3 - 13:06:55
11 - 2017-12-12 - Galileo-FOC M07 FM15 (Nicole)/FM16 (Zofia)/FM17 (Alexandre)/FM18 (Irina) - A Plane - Ariane 5 ES (VA240) - Kourou ELA-3 - 18:36:??
12 - 2018-07-25 - Galileo-FOC M08 FM19 (Tara)/FM20 (Samuel)/FM21 (Anna)/FM22 (Ellen) - B Plane - Ariane 5 ES (VA244) - Kourou ELA-3 - 11:25:??

Planned launches
№ - Date - Satellite(s) - Orbital Plane - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

13 - NET 2022 - Galileo-FOC FM27, Galileo-FOC FM28 - ?? - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
14 - NET 2022 - Galileo-FOC FM29, Galileo-FOC FM30 - ?? - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
15 - NET 2022 - 2 x Batch 3 - ?? - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
16 - NET 2022 - 2 x Batch 3 - ?? - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
17 - NET 2022 - 2 x Batch 3 - ?? - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
18 - NET 2022 - 2 x Batch 3 - ?? - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
19+ - 2020's - G2G (Galileo Second Generation) - ?? - Ariane - Kourou


Current constellation information can be consulted here:
http://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-status/Constellation-Information

And for orbital parameters:
http://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-status/orbital-and-technical-parameters

Launch Threads:
Historical:
GIOVE-A
GIOVE-B
Galileo-IOV M01
Galileo-IOV M02
Galileo-FOC M01
Galileo-FOC M02
Galileo-FOC M03
Galileo-FOC M04
Galileo-FOC M05
Galileo-FOC M06
Galileo-FOC M07
Galileo-FOC M08

Future
« Last Edit: 03/11/2020 01:11 am by baldusi »

Offline beidou

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 763
  • Mars
  • Liked: 48
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #1 on: 12/02/2013 07:46 pm »

Planned launches

№ - Date - Satellite(s) - Orbital Plane - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

05 - middle 2014 - Galileo-FOC FM01 (Doresa)/Galileo-FOC FM02 (Milena) - Third plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS??) -  Kourou ELS
06 - 2014 - Galileo-FOC FM03 (Adam)/Galileo-FOC FM04 (Anastasia) - First plane? - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS??) -  Kourou ELS
07 - 2014 - Galileo-FOC FM05 (Alba)/Galileo-FOC FM06 (Oriana) - Second plane? - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS??) -  Kourou ELS


According to an article here: http://www.insidegnss.com/node/3787, the mission plan in 2014 is correct.

Offline bolun

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3541
  • Europe
  • Liked: 950
  • Likes Given: 110
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #2 on: 01/02/2014 10:20 am »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Launchers/Deploying_multiple_satellites_with_Sylda_and_Vespa

Quote
a Galileo dispenser is being developed for Ariane 5 ES. This dispenser will be able to carry and release four Galileo satellites in pairs into orbits at some 22 300 km altitude.

Image credit: ESA

Offline Langley

  • Member
  • Posts: 29
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #3 on: 01/11/2014 02:09 pm »
Plane and slot designations of Galileo satellites launched thus far as well as designations of active satellites in the other global navigation satellite systems can be found here:
http://gpsworld.com/the-almanac/

Offline bolun

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3541
  • Europe
  • Liked: 950
  • Likes Given: 110
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #4 on: 04/14/2014 09:10 am »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Electric_thrusters_may_steer_Galileo_in_future

Electric thrusters may steer Galileo in future

Quote

“But for Galileo Second Generation, the satellites could potentially incorporate electric propulsion – allowing them to target themselves directly instead of relying on the upper stage.”

This would offer several advantages. Freeing up mass by doing without the upper stage means more satellites could be carried by individual rocket: up to three by Soyuz, while Ariane 5s carrying commercial telecom satellites could piggyback a quartet as secondary passengers. The lightweight Vega launchers might loft individual satellites.

At the same time, the mass of each satellite could still increase – up to 1500 kg or more from the current 700 kg. Enlarging the satellite would enable an expanded navigation payload to support a greatly extended range of Galileo services.


Offline bolun

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3541
  • Europe
  • Liked: 950
  • Likes Given: 110
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #5 on: 08/22/2014 08:50 am »
Arianespace serves the Galileo constellation and Europe's ambitions in space with the signature of three new launch services using Ariane 5 ES
 
Kourou, August 20, 2014

Today saw Arianespace and the European Space Agency (ESA), acting on behalf of the European Commission, convene at the Guiana Space Center, European spaceport, to sign a contract for three launch services with Ariane 5 ES in order to step up the deployment of the European navigation system Galileo, the European Union’s flagship program.

The contract for Arianespace’s three Ariane 5 launches to orbit a total of 12 Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites was signed at the Spaceport by Chairman and CEO Stéphane Israël (seated, at left) and Didier Faivre, ESA Director of the Galileo Program and Navigation-related Activities. Joining them were ESA Director General Jean-Jacques Dordain, and Daniel Calleja Crespo, Director General for Enterprise and Industry, European Commission.

With this new launch contract and thanks to the performance of Ariane 5 ES, a total of 12 Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites will be launched using three dedicated Ariane 5 ES launch-vehicles, each carrying four satellites. The Ariane 5 ES launches will take place from 2015 onwards.

http://www.arianespace.com/news-press-release/2014/8-20-2014.asp

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #6 on: 08/22/2014 05:25 pm »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this. If I had to bet, I guess they could do one ES towards the end of 2015, and one each on 2016 and 2017. That would leave just two more Galileo Soyuz missions (probably 2016).
But Ariane 5 schedule is really tight for 2015. But one you start to analyze the payload readiness limitations, they might have the ES stage at CSG and launch whenever the commercial payloads get a dealy (like the Optus case). The nice thing about Galileo is that they can launch basically any day, a great difference with the ISS complicated VV scheduling.

Offline MP99

Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #7 on: 08/23/2014 06:49 pm »
A launch yesterday on Soyuz looks to have delivered two Galileo sats to the wrong orbit:-

Quote
"Observations taken after the separation of the satellites from the Soyuz VS09 (rocket) for the Galileo Mission show a gap between the orbit achieved and that which was planned," said launch service provider Arianespace, in a statement.

"They have been placed on a lower orbit than expected. Teams are studying the impact this could have on the satellites," it added.

Arianespace declined to comment on whether their trajectories could be corrected, the AFP news agency reports.

cheers, Martin

Offline Scylla

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 715
  • Clinton NC, USA
  • Liked: 1130
  • Likes Given: 150
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #8 on: 08/24/2014 01:34 pm »
Press Release

Galileo satellites experience orbital injection anomaly on Soyuz launch: Initial report
Kourou, August 23, 2014
http://www.arianespace.com/news-press-release/2014/8-23-2014.asp

Quote
The targeted orbit was circular, inclined at 55 degrees with a semi major axis of 29,900 kilometers. The satellites are now in an elliptical orbit, with excentricity of 0.23, a semi major axis of 26,200 km and inclined at 49.8 degrees
« Last Edit: 08/24/2014 01:42 pm by Scylla »
I reject your reality and substitute my own--Doctor Who

Offline MP99

Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #9 on: 08/24/2014 02:35 pm »


Press Release

Galileo satellites experience orbital injection anomaly on Soyuz launch: Initial report
Kourou, August 23, 2014
http://www.arianespace.com/news-press-release/2014/8-23-2014.asp

Quote
The targeted orbit was circular, inclined at 55 degrees with a semi major axis of 29,900 kilometers. The satellites are now in an elliptical orbit, with excentricity of 0.23, a semi major axis of 26,200 km and inclined at 49.8 degrees

ISTM possible that these sats may still be able to form part of the constellation, but will only contribute for users in lower latitudes.

Given the altitude, I'd assume that users some way above 49.8 degrees would still be able to get a signal, but contribution to accuracy is reduced for lower inclinations above the horizon.

Cheers, Martin

Online Hobbes-22

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 938
  • Acme Engineering
    • Acme Engineering
  • Liked: 583
  • Likes Given: 482
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #10 on: 09/01/2014 10:05 am »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #11 on: 09/01/2014 01:06 pm »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?
I should have said that they have kept their "institutional" slot now that the ATV project ended. In other words, may be they decided to keep one ES launch per year and switched payloads to Galileo.

Offline floss

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 549
  • Liked: 33
  • Likes Given: 131
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #12 on: 09/01/2014 01:38 pm »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?
I should have said that they have kept their "institutional" slot now that the ATV project ended. In other words, may be they decided to keep one ES launch per year and switched payloads to Galileo.


Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #13 on: 09/01/2014 02:22 pm »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?
I should have said that they have kept their "institutional" slot now that the ATV project ended. In other words, may be they decided to keep one ES launch per year and switched payloads to Galileo.


Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?
Do you mean within Galileo deployment or for Ariane 5 in general?

Offline floss

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 549
  • Liked: 33
  • Likes Given: 131
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #14 on: 09/01/2014 02:32 pm »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?
I should have said that they have kept their "institutional" slot now that the ATV project ended. In other words, may be they decided to keep one ES launch per year and switched payloads to Galileo.


Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?
Do you mean within Galileo deployment or for Ariane 5 in general?


Gallileo deployment only a general increase will not get funding without a major political decision.

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #15 on: 09/01/2014 04:40 pm »
Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?
Do you mean within Galileo deployment or for Ariane 5 in general?
Gallileo deployment only a general increase will not get funding without a major political decision.
I don't have inside information, but they have had a lot of issues this year. Ariane-5 was seriously delayed because of the Optus-10 issues, and it already brought some delay from payload issues on 2013. So there's a lot of backlog. On the other hand, ESA pays a hefty subsidy and I imagine that they can reserve their slot for the ES.
Normally Ariane-5 have a 24 month lead time. And the contract for the three ES was signed just last month, but they had done a lot of integration work previously, and they had already signed a framework agreement that included Soyuz and Ariane-5. Thus, I'd guess that this was just rubber stamping what they were working on previously. As I said before, I don't have any insight, but I would hazard a guess that ES won't be a schedule issue (save delays of the previous mission).
Regarding Soyuz/Fregat, they are currently in stand down. It will take at least a couple of months before the combo is cleared for flight. If the thruster failure was a physical one, they might have to send the current Fregat back and get a new one, which might add some time. I would expect between 3 and 6 month delays on the Soyuz/Fregat schedule.
On the other hand, while current orbit of FOC M1 is outside of the Galileo allowed specification, it's perfectly good for satellite validation. Thus, the payload issues should be worked out and the only delay should be for the Soyuz segment. I don't expect an additional ES because the Soyuz is much cheaper.
I also expect that ESA will make an additional 6 satellite buy to replenish the fleet. But that's pure speculation on my part.

Offline floss

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 549
  • Liked: 33
  • Likes Given: 131
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #16 on: 09/14/2014 07:54 pm »
Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?
Do you mean within Galileo deployment or for Ariane 5 in general?
Gallileo deployment only a general increase will not get funding without a major political decision.
I don't have inside information, but they have had a lot of issues this year. Ariane-5 was seriously delayed because of the Optus-10 issues, and it already brought some delay from payload issues on 2013. So there's a lot of backlog. On the other hand, ESA pays a hefty subsidy and I imagine that they can reserve their slot for the ES.
Normally Ariane-5 have a 24 month lead time. And the contract for the three ES was signed just last month, but they had done a lot of integration work previously, and they had already signed a framework agreement that included Soyuz and Ariane-5. Thus, I'd guess that this was just rubber stamping what they were working on previously. As I said before, I don't have any insight, but I would hazard a guess that ES won't be a schedule issue (save delays of the previous mission).
Regarding Soyuz/Fregat, they are currently in stand down. It will take at least a couple of months before the combo is cleared for flight. If the thruster failure was a physical one, they might have to send the current Fregat back and get a new one, which might add some time. I would expect between 3 and 6 month delays on the Soyuz/Fregat schedule.
On the other hand, while current orbit of FOC M1 is outside of the Galileo allowed specification, it's perfectly good for satellite validation. Thus, the payload issues should be worked out and the only delay should be for the Soyuz segment. I don't expect an additional ES because the Soyuz is much cheaper.
I also expect that ESA will make an additional 6 satellite buy to replenish the fleet. But that's pure speculation on my part.


Thank you so much.

Offline beidou

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 763
  • Mars
  • Liked: 48
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #17 on: 09/22/2014 06:44 pm »
The current status of various Galileo Foc satellites.

Offline beidou

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 763
  • Mars
  • Liked: 48
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #18 on: 10/24/2014 05:53 pm »
Quote
One voice close to the action says, “The problems of Galileo are not within the power of the Commissioner. At present, out of six satellites in orbit, only one is truly functional. Next launch, of two with Soyuz, could be in February, followed by an Arianne 5 launch in September-October [2015]. So, we’ve lost two full years — 2013 and 2014.”
http://www.insidegnss.com/node/4254

Offline Jester

  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7979
  • Earth
  • Liked: 6533
  • Likes Given: 157
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #19 on: 10/25/2014 08:45 am »
Quote
One voice close to the action says, “The problems of Galileo are not within the power of the Commissioner. At present, out of six satellites in orbit, only one is truly functional. Next launch, of two with Soyuz, could be in February, followed by an Arianne 5 launch in September-October [2015]. So, we’ve lost two full years — 2013 and 2014.”
http://www.insidegnss.com/node/4254

And that voice is very VERY wrong.

Offline beidou

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 763
  • Mars
  • Liked: 48
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #20 on: 10/25/2014 08:15 pm »
Then how is the correct voice like?

Offline Jester

  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7979
  • Earth
  • Liked: 6533
  • Likes Given: 157
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #21 on: 10/26/2014 09:51 am »
Then how is the correct voice like?

all 6 are functional, IOV has 4, all operational, with 1 on less power, FOC has 2 functional but with part of the payload switched off until in better orbit.

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #22 on: 10/26/2014 12:30 pm »

Then how is the correct voice like?

all 6 are functional, IOV has 4, all operational, with 1 on less power, FOC has 2 functional but with part of the payload switched off until in better orbit.
Didn't the IOVs had issues not only with power but with one type of clock?

Offline zotiraki

  • Member
  • Posts: 20
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #23 on: 10/29/2014 05:01 pm »
Cost of launch on Soyuz vs Ariane 5ES seems to be close to a wash. 

ESA contract, worth 500 million euros (663 million U.S. dollars) for three Ariane-5 launchers, each carrying 4 satellies - $55.25M per sat

http://bicoltoday.com/2014/08/22/esa-signs-contract-with-arianespace-for-satellite-launch/

Contract with Arianespace covers the launch of five Soyuz launchers, each carrying two satellites. The first launch is scheduled for October 2012. The value of the contract amounts to €397 million (US$569 million). - $56.9M per satellite.

http://www.spacenews.com/article/galileo-program-feels-sharp-rise-russian-rocket-prices

Anybody have an idea when ESA will pursue the additional 6 Galileo FOC satellites?


Offline beidou

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 763
  • Mars
  • Liked: 48
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #24 on: 10/29/2014 05:52 pm »
Then how is the correct voice like?

all 6 are functional, IOV has 4, all operational, with 1 on less power, FOC has 2 functional but with part of the payload switched off until in better orbit.

A functional satellite doesn't mean it's operational, a.k.a., can be set as healthy.

Offline SIM city

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 208
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #25 on: 10/29/2014 05:53 pm »
Not sure if that's an apples to apples comparison.  Soyuz contract seems to include adapters and any vehicle changes/upgrades for the Galileo program.  That was contracted separately for Ariane with Astrium.  And there were reservation fees back in 2012 for the right to these launches that might not be included in the 500M.

Offline beidou

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 763
  • Mars
  • Liked: 48
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #26 on: 10/30/2014 11:29 am »
An interesting article from GPS World - Galileo: A Constellation of One?
http://gpsworld.com/galileo-a-constellation-of-one/

Offline MTom

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 573
  • EU / Hungary
  • Liked: 340
  • Likes Given: 990
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #27 on: 10/30/2014 12:06 pm »
An interesting article from GPS World - Galileo: A Constellation of One?
http://gpsworld.com/galileo-a-constellation-of-one/

This is a good example how could be a project suffering with some problems darkened as would have been totally failed.
Like the Hubble troubles at the beginning. And now? Nobody questioning the results yet.
« Last Edit: 10/30/2014 12:15 pm by MTom »

Offline Jester

  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7979
  • Earth
  • Liked: 6533
  • Likes Given: 157
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #28 on: 11/01/2014 08:29 am »
An interesting article from GPS World - Galileo: A Constellation of One?
http://gpsworld.com/galileo-a-constellation-of-one/

yawn:

"for most (E1/L1-only, single-point) users, four of the six satellites are currently quite useable. Moreover, preliminary studies suggest that, once on line, the latest two satellites will be perfectly usable, despite the irregular orbits. And, as we have heard, there will be attempts to make the orbits somewhat more circular.”


Offline sdsds

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7092
  • “With peace and hope for all mankind.”
  • Seattle
  • Liked: 1947
  • Likes Given: 1911
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #29 on: 12/03/2014 05:28 pm »
Europe recovers wayward Galileo satellite
Reuters
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/europe-recovers-wayward-galileo-satellite-122441964.html

"The European Space Agency (ESA) said on Wednesday that the fifth satellite has now performed 11 manoeuvres over 17 days to gradually shift to a more circular orbit and will run through a series of tests over the coming days."
— 𝐬𝐝𝐒𝐝𝐬 —

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #30 on: 12/03/2014 06:43 pm »
The ESA Press Release
Quote
Galileo Satellite Recovered and Transmitting Navigation Signals
3 December 2014 Europe’s fifth Galileo satellite, one of two delivered into a wrong orbit by VS09 Soyuz-Fregat launcher in August, has transmitted its first navigation signal in space on Saturday 29 November 2014. It has reached its new target orbit and its navigation payload has been successfully switched on.

A detailed test campaign is under way now the satellite has reached a more suitable orbit for navigation purposes.

Recovery

The fifth and sixth Galileo satellites, launched together on 22 August, ended up in an elongated orbit travelling up to 25 900 km above Earth and back down to 13 713 km.

A total of 11 manoeuvres were performed across 17 days, gradually nudging the fifth satellite upwards at the lowest point of its orbit.

As a result, it has risen more than 3500 km and its elliptical orbit has become more circular.

“The manoeuvres were all normal, with excellent performance both in terms of thrust and direction,” explained Daniel Navarro-Reyes, ESA Galileo mission analyst.

“The final orbit is as we targeted and is a tribute to the great professionalism of all the teams involved.”

The commands were issued from the Galileo Control Centre by Space Opal, the Galileo operator, at Oberpfaffenhofen in Germany, guided by calculations from a combined flight dynamics team of ESA’s Space Operations Centre, ESOC, in Darmstadt, Germany and France’s CNES space agency.

The commands were uploaded to the satellite via an extended network of ground stations, made up of Galileo stations and additional sites coordinated by France’s CNES space agency.

Satellite manufacturer OHB also provided expertise throughout the recovery, helping to adapt the flight procedures.

Until the manoeuvres started, the combined ESA–CNES team maintained the satellites pointing at the Sun using their gyroscopes and solar sensors. This kept the satellites steady in space but their navigation payloads could not be used reliably.

In the new orbit, the satellite’s radiation exposure has also been greatly reduced, ensuring reliable performance for the long term.

A suitable orbit

The revised, more circular orbit means the fifth satellite’s Earth sensor can be used continuously, keeping its main antenna oriented towards Earth and allowing its navigation payload to be switched on.

Significantly, the orbit means that it will now overfly the same location on the ground every 20 days. This compares to a normal Galileo repeat pattern of every 10 days, effectively synchronising its ground track with the rest of the Galileo constellation.

The navigation test campaign

The satellite’s navigation payload was activated on 29 November, to begin the full ‘In-Orbit Test’ campaign. This is being performed from ESA’s Redu centre in Belgium, where a 20 m-diameter antenna can study the strength and shape of the navigation signals at high resolution.

“First, the various payload elements, especially the Passive Hydrogen Maser atomic clock, were warmed up, then the payload’s first ‘signal in space’ was transmitted,” said David Sanchez-Cabezudo, managing the test campaign.

“The satellite-broadcast L-band navigation signal is monitored using the large antenna at Redu, with experts from OHB and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd – the payload manufacturer, based in Guildford, UK – also on hand to analyse how it performs over time.”

The first Galileo FOC navigation signal-in-space transmitting in the three Galileo frequency bands (E5/E6/L1) was tracked  by Galileo Test User Receivers deployed at various locations in Europe, namely at Redu (B), ESTEC (NL), Weilheim (D) and Rome (I). The quality of the signal is good and in line with expectations.

The Search And Rescue (SAR) payload will be switched on in few days in order to complement the in-orbit test campaign.

The way forward

The same recovery manoeuvres are planned for the sixth satellite, taking it into the same orbital plane but on the opposite side of Earth.

The decision whether to use the two satellites for Navigation and SAR purposes as part of the Galileo constellation will be taken by the European Commission based on the test results.

About Galileo

Galileo is Europe’s own global satellite navigation system. It will consist of 30 satellites and their ground infrastructure.

The definition phase and the development and In-Orbit Validation phase of the Galileo programme were carried out by the European Space Agency (ESA) and co-funded by ESA and the European Union. This phase has created a mini-constellation of four satellites and a reduced ground segment dedicated to validating the overall concept.

The four satellites launched during the IOV phase form the core of the constellation that is being extended to reach Full Operational Capability (FOC).

The FOC phase is fully funded by the European Commission. The Commission and ESA have signed a delegation agreement by which ESA acts as design and procurement agent on behalf of the Commission.

Learn more about Galileo at: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation

About the European Space Agency

The European Space Agency (ESA) provides Europe’s gateway to space.

ESA is an intergovernmental organisation, created in 1975, with the mission to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space delivers benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world.

ESA has 20 Member States: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, of whom 18 are Member States of the EU. Two other Member States of the EU, Hungary and Estonia, are likely soon to become new ESA Member States.

ESA has Cooperation Agreements with six other Member States of the EU. Canada takes part in some ESA programmes under a Cooperation Agreement.

ESA is also working with the EU on implementing the Galileo and Copernicus programmes.

By coordinating the financial and intellectual resources of its members, ESA can undertake programmes and activities far beyond the scope of any single European country.

ESA develops the launchers, spacecraft and ground facilities needed to keep Europe at the forefront of global space activities.

Today, it develops and launches satellites for Earth observation, navigation, telecommunications and astronomy, sends probes to the far reaches of the Solar System and cooperates in the human exploration of space.

Learn more about ESA at www.esa.int

For further information, please contact:

ESA Media Relations Office

Email: [email protected]
Tel: +33 1 53 69 72 99
« Last Edit: 12/03/2014 06:45 pm by baldusi »

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #31 on: 01/22/2015 12:21 am »
ESA ops chief Reiter: 2 Galileo sats to launch ~ March 27 on Euro Soyuz, then 2 more on Sept Soyuz & final in Dec. No 2015 Ariane 5 Galileo.

10:40am - 21 Jan 15

https://mobile.twitter.com/pbdes/status/557835190660526080

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #32 on: 09/11/2015 11:40 pm »
Excerpt from Dr. Langley's post on CANSPACE email list

Quote
    The next Galileo launch after this evening's will be in December on a Soyuz launcher when another two satellites will be placed into orbit.

    In 2016, there will be one launch but using, for the first time, the Ariane 5 launcher, to place four satellites into orbit.

    In 2017, there will be two launches: a Soyuz launch orbiting two satellites, and an Ariane 5 launch, orbiting four satellites.

    A 30-satellite constellation will be in place by 2020, following ESA's slogan "30 satellites by 2020," with 10 satellites per plane with each plane having two spare satellites. This should be feasible as two satellites are now being manufactured every three months. Twenty-four satellites is the minimum for Galileo operational capability.

Offline Prober

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10348
  • Save the spin....I'm keeping you honest!
  • Nevada
  • Liked: 721
  • Likes Given: 729
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #33 on: 11/15/2015 07:57 pm »
http://gizmodo.com/a-satellite-mishap-is-allowing-physicists-to-test-einst-1742536522

"Last year, a Russian Soyuz rocket accidentally placed two ESA-operated GPS satellites into elliptical, rather than circular, orbits. The faulty launch leaves the satellites unfit to perform their intended duties as part of a global Galileo GPS system. It would have been a huge waste of money and resources, but there’s a silver lining

To wit, physicists now have a unique opportunity to test one of the key predictions of Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity: That clocks run more slowly when they’re close to heavy objects, because of how gravity warps the fabric of spacetime. (Remember Miller’s planet from Interstellar, where an hour is actually seven years of Earth time thanks to the monster black hole next door? Same principle)."
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
"I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant..." --Isoroku Yamamoto

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #34 on: 11/18/2016 11:39 am »
With Galileo-FOC M06, the 18 satellites necessary for IOC are now in orbit. For some reason, even though M06 has already put four new satllites on orbit, FM08 (Andriana) and FM09 (Liene) are still not commissioned into service. If they take more than six months to commission, IOC might end up in the second half of 2017.

Offline beidou

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 763
  • Mars
  • Liked: 48
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #35 on: 11/18/2016 03:04 pm »
With Galileo-FOC M06, the 18 satellites necessary for IOC are now in orbit. For some reason, even though M06 has already put four new satllites on orbit, FM08 (Andriana) and FM09 (Liene) are still not commissioned into service. If they take more than six months to commission, IOC might end up in the second half of 2017.

The europeans can declare a Galileo IOC with only 14, not 18 satellites.

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #36 on: 11/18/2016 05:43 pm »
With Galileo-FOC M06, the 18 satellites necessary for IOC are now in orbit. For some reason, even though M06 has already put four new satllites on orbit, FM08 (Andriana) and FM09 (Liene) are still not commissioned into service. If they take more than six months to commission, IOC might end up in the second half of 2017.

The europeans can declare a Galileo IOC with only 14, not 18 satellites.

I think you are confusing a bit the terms:
http://www.galileoic.org/node/149
and
http://www.navipedia.net/index.php/Galileo_Future_and_Evolutions

State that they need two things for IOC: 18 satellite for sub 4m accuracy and GPS interoperability. They also state that they needed 14 FOC satellites, on top of the 4 IOV satellites, thus 18 total. They have one IOV down and two FOC in the wrong orbit. So they really needed a successful M06 to achieve IOC.
If they had had four healthy IOV and M01 had been successful, they might have had IOC. But they had too many anomalies.

Offline vyoma

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1878
  • India
  • Liked: 850
  • Likes Given: 127
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #37 on: 01/18/2017 07:38 pm »
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38664225

Quote
Across the 18 satellites now in orbit, nine clocks have stopped operating.
Three are traditional rubidium devices; six are the more precise hydrogen maser instruments that were designed to give Galileo superior performance to the American GPS network.

Quote
All 18 spacecraft currently in space continue to operate, but one of them is now down to just two clocks.
Most of the maser failures (5) have occurred on the satellites that were originally sent into orbit to validate the system, whereas all three rubidium stoppages are on the spacecraft that were subsequently launched to fill out the network.

Quote
It appears the rubidium failures "all seem to have a consistent signature, linked to probable short circuits, and possibly a particular test procedure performed on the ground".

Quote
The maser clock failures are said to be better understood, with two likely causes, the second of which has caused most grief.
The Esa statement said this second scenario was "related to the fact that when some healthy [hydrogen maser] clocks are turned off for long periods, they do not restart due to a change in clock characteristics".

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #38 on: 01/18/2017 11:40 pm »
Both payloads (Thales and SSTL) use the same clocks?

Offline vyoma

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1878
  • India
  • Liked: 850
  • Likes Given: 127
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #39 on: 01/19/2017 12:39 am »
Looks like it:

Quote
Esa staff at its technical centre, ESTEC, in the Netherlands are trying to isolate the cause the of failures - with the assistance of the clock (Spectratime of Switzerland) and satellite manufacturers (Airbus and Thales Alenia Space; OHB and SSTL). It is understood engineers have managed to restart another hydrogen clock that had stopped.

And, here's the rundown on numbers:

Quote
Galileo's atomic clocks by the numbers:

- First four satellites launched were called In Orbit Validation (IOV) platforms

- The next 14 were referred to as Full Operational Constellation (FOC) satellites

- Three of the rubidium clock failures have occurred on Galileo's FOC satellites

- Five of the hydrogen maser failures have occurred on the IOV spacecraft

- One maser has stopped on an FOC satellite, giving nine failures in total

- Three of the four IOVs are affected; two of the 14 FOC satellites are affected

- Every satellite has two hydrogen maser clocks and two rubidium clocks

- That means a total of 72 atomic clocks are currently in orbit

- All Galileo satellites presently have at least two working clocks

Offline bolun

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3541
  • Europe
  • Liked: 950
  • Likes Given: 110
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #40 on: 06/10/2017 12:40 pm »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Galileo/Launching_Galileo/Galileo_grows_two_more_satellites_join_working_constellation

Quote
Two further satellites have formally become part of Europe’s Galileo satnav system, broadcasting timing and navigation signals worldwide while also picking up distress calls across the planet.

These are the 15th and 16th satellites to join the network, two of the four Galileos that were launched together by Ariane 5 on 17 November, and the first additions to the working constellation since the start of Galileo Initial Services on 15 December.

Offline beidou

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 763
  • Mars
  • Liked: 48
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #41 on: 06/22/2017 08:28 pm »
ESA and the European Commission awarding the Bremen-based satellite producer a contract for a further eight navigation satellites

Bremen, Paris, June 22, 2017. OHB System AG was awarded a contract to produce additional eight navigation satellites for the Galileo programme.
Signed today, the contract is worth EUR 324 million. This will increase the number of Galileo FOC satellites supplied by OHB to a total of 30, of which the first 14 are already in orbit.

“This procurement from OHB will enable to complete the Galileo constellation and have reserves both in-obit and on-ground. The 30 satellites added to the 4 IOV satellites now bring the necessary infrastructure robustness that is essential for the provision of Galileo services world-wide. We are looking forward to work once more with OHB in the next phase” stated Paul Verhoef, ESA’s Director of Satellite Navigation.

“I am very pleased that after delivering 22 satellites under the first two contracts OHB has now also retained the confidence of ESA and the European Commission in the third bid. We are proud of being able to make such a crucial contribution to this major European project that will be providing so many people around the world with valuable services,” said Marco Fuchs, CEO of OHB-System AG, after signing the contract in Paris on June 22nd, 2017.

Continuation of the proven satellite design
“Our modular satellite design is outstanding and has proven itself with superb results. A large part of the satellites that we have already assembled have demonstrated their full functional capability in space. For this reason, there will be no major changes to the design of the eight new satellites. At this stage, we are working on the basis of a first launch date in 2020,” says Dr. Wolfgang Paetsch, director of navigation at OHB System AG, who previously oversaw the development of the first and second satellite batch.
In its capacity as the producer of the satellite platform and the system manager, OHB is responsible for the satellite design and platform, integration and verification. In addition, it will be providing support during the launch preparations and in-orbit verification.

Successful partnerships to be continued
OHB will be able to rely on proven partnerships and subcontractors. As with the previous two contracts, the OHB UK partner Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL) has contributed also to this successful offer with the navigation payloads.
Management Board member Dr. Ingo Engeln, who is responsible for OHB System AG’s institutional space projects, is pleased to be able to continue production of the satellites. “Our proven processes and structures, the seven assembly islands in Bremen, the corresponding facilities at the other integration and testing sites and, not least of all, the highly trained teams at participating companies provide an ideal basis for expanding the satellite constellation swiftly.” This together with the modular design of the satellites will ensure that a pair of two satellites can be delivered within three months after the pair of satellites delivered before.

Shaping the future
Obviously, OHB wants to continue contributing to this beneficial project in the future. In Bremen, it is already working on designs for the next-generation Galileo satellites. In various studies for ESA, the engineers are exploring new materials and components and further services to be provided by the next generation. Needless to say, they are incorporating the experience gained from engineering and producing the previous navigation satellites. In this way, OHB can contribute proposals for the design of the next-generation satellites and offer the customer the benefits of the unique experience that it has gained from the successful first series.

from left to right  W. Paetsch, Director Navigation of OHB System AG, P. Delsaux, Deputy Director-General of DG-Growth, European Commission, M. Fuchs, CEO of OHB System AG, J. Woerner, Director General ESA, P. Verhoef, Director of Navigation, ESA
from left to right W. Paetsch, Director Navigation of OHB System AG, P. Delsaux, Deputy Director-General of DG-Growth, European Commission, M. Fuchs, CEO of OHB System AG, J. Woerner, Director General ESA, P. Verhoef, Director of Navigation, ESA

Galileo FOC satellites undergoing testing at a cleanroom at the space center in Kourou, French-Guyana. © ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE
Galileo FOC satellites undergoing testing at a cleanroom at the space center in Kourou, French-Guyana. © ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE

Four Galileo FOC satellites developed and built by OHB were successfully placed in orbit on board an Ariane 5 ES launcher on November 17, 2016.
Four Galileo FOC satellites developed and built by OHB were successfully placed in orbit on board an Ariane 5 ES launcher on November 17, 2016.

https://www.ohb-system.de/press-releases-details/serial-success-ohb-wins-third-tender-for-galileo-satellites.html

Offline Rik ISS-fan

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1512
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 604
  • Likes Given: 210
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #42 on: 08/19/2017 06:45 am »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1512
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 604
  • Likes Given: 210
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #43 on: 09/16/2017 12:09 am »
I'm a bit upset by the news that two Ariane 62 launchers have been ordered to launch two Galileo-satellites each.
Inside the presentations from the Industry days, it is stated that launch service cost for A62 will be 85mln $; and for A64 130mln.
A Vega-C could also orbit a single Galileo-satellite, this launch will cost about 35mln.
My opinion is; that dual Galileo-satellite launch on A62 will be to expansive.
They should launch 4x Galileo-satellites on each A62, if that's not possible, Launch 4x on A64 or one on Vega-C.
2x on A62 @85mln = 42.5mln/Sat
4x on A62 @85mln = 21.5mln/Sat
4x on A64 @130mln=26.5 32,5mln/Sat
One on a Vega-C costs 35mln if I'm not mistaken.
The single Sat on Vega-C should the most expensive launch option per satellite.

Two on A62 is a waist of money. This is EU funded, so paid by European citizens via taxes. My opinion is that wasting public money is very bad. (Also US government launched procurement, from all companies.)

The disadvantages of launching four at a time instead of two are:
1) launch rate goes down from 1/year to 1/2years (24x Galileo satellites with 12year service live.)
2) production and processing is more demanding (2sats/year vs. 4sats/2year

There is a second reason I'm against using A6 to launch FOC Sat 23-26. Using A6 would keen that the Galileo  system wouldn't contain 24 sats until after 2020. (4xIOC + 22×FOC - 2x FOC wrong orbit, - 1x defect = 23 after 2018.
They should order another (4th) A5ES Galileo for FOC 23-26 with a launch date in 2019. Or dual Soyuz or a single Vega-C launch during 2019.
« Last Edit: 07/28/2018 01:53 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline calapine

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 238
  • Linz, Austria
  • Liked: 193
  • Likes Given: 166
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #44 on: 09/16/2017 04:51 am »
Before we start a debate:

Is it sure that Vega-C will be able to launch a single Galileo at all?
Same question regarding Ariane 62 and quad-launches

I'm a bit sceptical of both to be honest.


Offline Mike Jones

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 101
  • Latvia
  • Liked: 34
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #45 on: 09/16/2017 05:54 am »
Vega C was targeted at 35 M€ (not dollars) and lacks performance in its current version to even launch a single Galileo sat to MEO @ 22000km.

Offline Skyrocket

  • Extreme Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2622
  • Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  • Liked: 924
  • Likes Given: 170
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #46 on: 09/16/2017 11:42 am »
I'm a bit upset by the news that two Ariane 62 launchers have been ordered to launch two Galileo-satellites each.
Inside the presentations from the Industry days, it is stated that launch service cost for A62 will be 85mln $; and for A64 130mln.
A Vega-C could also orbit a single Galileo-satellite, this launch will cost about 35mln.
My opinion is; that dual Galileo-satellite launch on A62 will be to expansive.
They should launch 4x Galileo-satellites on each A62, if that's not possible, Launch 4x on A64 or one on Vega-C.
2x on A62 @85mln = 42.5mln/Sat
4x on A62 @85mln = 21.5mln/Sat
4x on A64 @130mln=26.5mln/Sat

The launch performance for A62 to the Galileo orbit is about 1700 kg according to the users guide. A quadruple Galileo launch on a A62 is therefore not possible.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2017 11:43 am by Skyrocket »

Offline russianhalo117

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8744
  • Liked: 4646
  • Likes Given: 768
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #47 on: 09/16/2017 11:24 pm »
I'm a bit upset by the news that two Ariane 62 launchers have been ordered to launch two Galileo-satellites each.
Inside the presentations from the Industry days, it is stated that launch service cost for A62 will be 85mln $; and for A64 130mln.
A Vega-C could also orbit a single Galileo-satellite, this launch will cost about 35mln.
My opinion is; that dual Galileo-satellite launch on A62 will be to expansive.
They should launch 4x Galileo-satellites on each A62, if that's not possible, Launch 4x on A64 or one on Vega-C.
2x on A62 @85mln = 42.5mln/Sat
4x on A62 @85mln = 21.5mln/Sat
4x on A64 @130mln=26.5mln/Sat

The launch performance for A62 to the Galileo orbit is about 1700 kg according to the users guide. A quadruple Galileo launch on a A62 is therefore not possible.
launching one of the first gen Galileo sats on Vega Family is not possible due to the deployment architecture being designed only to launch in pairs and and quads. If launching one on Vega it would require asymmetrical mounting with moveable ballast as at sep the upper stages center of gravity would shift to the side opposite of the satellites location and would induct an end over end spin preventing the CCAM and deorbit maneuvers.

Offline beidou

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 763
  • Mars
  • Liked: 48
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #48 on: 10/05/2017 10:24 pm »
New contract award for OHB: European Commission orders a further four Galileo satellites

Bremen, October 5, 2017


The European Commission has exercised one of its contractual options for the European Galileo navigation system and ordered a further four satellites from OHB System AG. As recently as in June 2017, the Bremen-based satellite producer had been awarded a contract for eight Galileo FOC*) satellites under the Batch 3 tender. “Once again, the quality of our navigation satellites has spoken for itself. I am very grateful to the European Commission and the European Space Agency ESA for the confidence which they have placed in us and our partners,” says Marco Fuchs, Chief Executive Officer of OHB SE.

“Following the completion of the satellites under the contract awarded in June, we will be commencing work seamlessly on the four satellites under the new contract. The ambitious schedule means that looking forward reserve satellites will be available both in orbit and on the ground,” adds Dr. Wolfgang Paetsch, who is the member of the OHB System AG Management Board responsible for navigation, Earth observation and science.

The contract for the four satellites has a value of EUR 157.75 million. As with the previous contracts, OHB System AG in its capacity as the producer of the satellite platform and the system manager is responsible for the satellite design and platform, integration and verification. In addition, it will be providing support during the launch preparations and in-orbit verification. The contract increases the total number of Galileo satellites ordered from OHB System AG to 34. Of these, 14 are already in orbit. The satellite constellation is to be expanded incrementally.

Assembly work on the Ariane 6 launcher to commence in October
With a mass of 750 kilograms each, the Batch 3 satellites will be placed in their respective orbit approximately 23,000 kilometers above the surface of the Earth by Ariane 6 2 launchers. MT Aerospace AG, a subsidiary of OHB SE, is the largest supplier for the Ariane program outside the Ariane group. The Augsburg-based company supplies almost all of the tank and structural components for the new launcher. “Production will be commencing at the beginning of 2018 at the new halls built for this purpose in Augsburg,” says Hans J. Steininger, Chief Executive Officer of MT Aerospace AG. “We will be starting work on completing the upper stage tanks for the Ariane 6 at the MT hall at Bremen airport in the near future. With a floor area of 4,000 square meters, the hall has been specially built for this purpose.”

About the Galileo system
The European Galileo satellite navigation system will offer people in Europe and around the world numerous positioning, navigation and timekeeping services. Under the tender for Batch 3 in June 2017, a contract for the delivery of eight satellites was awarded to OHB System AG, followed now by a further four satellites, bringing to 26 the total of satellites produced to date. Of these,18 are currently in orbit. Preliminary Galileo services went live on December 15, 2016 in a preliminary step towards full operational mode. The constellation is to be expanded with the addition of further satellites. This incrementally increases the capabilities and global availability of the system.
More information on Galileo can be found on the ESA website at: http://www.esa.int/esasearch?q=Galileo&r=lokale_nachrichten_deutschland
and http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation

*) The Full Operational Capability phase of the Galileo program is managed and fully funded by the European Union. The Commission and ESA have signed a delegation agreement by which ESA acts as design and procurement agent on behalf of the Commission. The views expressed in this Press Release can in no way be taken to reflect the opinion of the European Union and/or ESA. “Galileo” is a trademark subject to OHIM application number 002742237 by EU and ESA.

For further Information please contact:

Julia Riedl
Corporate Communications
Phone: +49 8153 4002 249
Fax: +49 8153 4002 99 249
E-Mail: [email protected]

Offline bolun

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3541
  • Europe
  • Liked: 950
  • Likes Given: 110
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #49 on: 10/20/2017 01:33 pm »
http://www.esa.int/For_Media/Press_Releases/ESA_Council_October_2017

Quote
The ESA Council, chaired by Jean-Yves Le Gall, met on 17–18 October in Paris, France.

Quote
The Director of Navigation, Paul Verhoef, presented the status of Galileo and plans for the Second Generation.

With 18 satellites now in orbit, a full constellation will include eight more satellites to be launched by mid-2018, providing 99.8% global coverage.

Hardware manufacturers like Samsung are including Galileo in their chipsets, the latest being Apple in the new generation of iPhones, unveiled last month.

“A technical benchmarking of the different satellite navigation systems has demonstrated that Europe is already the ‘best in class’ in terms of precision,” commented ESA Director General Jan Woerner.

Preparations are under way for the second generation of Galileo.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/10/Galileo_in_smartphones

Quote
Galileo in smartphones

Europe’s Galileo satellite navigation system seen at work with commercially available Samsung S8+ smartphones.

The sky has been full of Galileo signals since Europe’s satnav system began Initial Services at the end of last year, and a steady stream of Galileo-ready devices is finding its way to the marketplace.

This has been underpinned with years of effort by ESA’s Navigation Laboratory, working with European manufacturers of mass-market satnav chips and receivers as well as ESA’s Galileo team in cooperation with the European Global Navigation Satellite System Agency.

Industry responded to Initial Services by making the first Galileo-enabled smartphones available to the public. The list of available devices includes phones from Apple, BQ, Huawei, Samsung and Sony.

Image credit: ESA–G. Porter,   CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
« Last Edit: 10/20/2017 04:44 pm by bolun »

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #50 on: 07/26/2018 04:04 pm »
A question now that the last batch of the original satellites have been launched - there are 26 satellites in orbit now but only 22 that can be functional (so far - I don't know if the clock problems (?) on FOC FM-04/GSAT 0204 is permanent), with 0104's power problems seems to be unsolvable and 0201/0202 in a wrong orbit.

Until more replacement satellites are launched and enter service in 2021-ish, how much performance penalty would the constellation have from the original planned 3 x 8 "FOC complete constellation"?
Astronomy & spaceflight geek penguin. In a relationship w/ Space Shuttle Discovery. Current Priority: Chasing the Chinese Spaceflight Wonder Egg & A Certain Chinese Mars Rover

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #51 on: 07/26/2018 09:29 pm »
Quote
(so far - I don't know if the clock problems (?) on FOC FM-04/GSAT 0204 is permanent),

cryptic NAGU:

Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2017045
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2017-11-23 17:45
NAGU TYPE: GENERAL
NAGU NUMBER: 2017045
NAGU SUBJECT: GSAT0204 REMOVED FROM ACTIVE SERVICE FOR CONSTELLATION MANAGEMENT PURPOSES
NAGU REFERENCED TO: N/A
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2017-12-08 07:30
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0204
EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0204 NOT CONTRIBUTING TO SERVICE PROVISION (ALL SIGNALS) FROM 2017-12-08 UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

I`m guessing:
GSAT-0204 has no working hydrogen clock anymore. The problems with these clocks (if they still work) can be avoided in orbit.
The rubidium-clocks in the FOC satellites until 2016 (?) may fail due to a manufacturing defect.
(does not affect the IOV satellites)
Since the rubidium-clocks on GSAT-0204 can fail without warning, the satellite spared during the "Initial Service".
After that, he will be put back into operation and will work as long as possible.
« Last Edit: 07/27/2018 07:07 am by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #52 on: 07/28/2018 08:19 am »
Galileo: from GIOVE to constellation



Paul Verhoef describes the plan at 2:29

two satellites in an elliptical orbit ... we can still use it ...
(GSAT0201 and GSAT0202, but, as far as I know, the orbit cannot be imaged in the almanac)
one satellite is a reserve ... (GSAT0204)
one satellite is faulty ... (GSAT0104)

in brackets from me
« Last Edit: 07/28/2018 08:31 am by GWR64 »

Offline nzguy

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 228
  • Liked: 186
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #53 on: 07/29/2018 12:29 am »
Yes GSAT0201/0202 can be used by receiver with ephemeris but not the almanac from current ICD version as there is not enough range in one or the orbit parameters. It's possible to update the Galileo ICD to increase the parameter range which would allow them in the almanac but GNSS receivers will need a firmware update to recognise them.

Decent GNSS receivers would still find them without almanac but the cell phone receivers might not. The low power chips used in phones often do not run full PRN searches as they rely on the almanac downloaded over the Internet.

I think even with a few satellites missing the availability will be in high 90s percentage. Most receivers also use GPS so I doubt it will be an issue for the several minutes a day there isn't 4 Galileo visible.

Offline TripleSeven

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1145
  • Istanbul Turkey and Santa Fe TEXAS USA
  • Liked: 588
  • Likes Given: 2095
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #54 on: 07/29/2018 12:46 am »
Yes GSAT0201/0202 can be used by receiver with ephemeris but not the almanac from current ICD version as there is not enough range in one or the orbit parameters. It's possible to update the Galileo ICD to increase the parameter range which would allow them in the almanac but GNSS receivers will need a firmware update to recognise them.

Decent GNSS receivers would still find them without almanac but the cell phone receivers might not. The low power chips used in phones often do not run full PRN searches as they rely on the almanac downloaded over the Internet.

I think even with a few satellites missing the availability will be in high 90s percentage. Most receivers also use GPS so I doubt it will be an issue for the several minutes a day there isn't 4 Galileo visible.

Our PBN systems use GPS primary but we can also take signals from Galileo...the computer rarely does :)

here at IST my station monitors all of the nav systems in range...the Chinese are below the horizon but the Indian geo sats are mostly visible...the Polot Hotel does a little blockage :)

Offline bolun

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3541
  • Europe
  • Liked: 950
  • Likes Given: 110
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #55 on: 12/04/2018 06:09 pm »
Galileo satellites prove Einstein's Relativity Theory to highest accuracy yet

4 December 2018

Europe’s Galileo satellite navigation system – already serving users globally – has now provided a historic service to the physics community worldwide, enabling the most accurate measurement ever made of how shifts in gravity alter the passing of time, a key element of Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity.

Two European fundamental physics teams working in parallel have independently achieved about a fivefold improvement in measuring accuracy of the gravity-driven time dilation effect known as ‘gravitational redshift’.

The prestigious Physical Review Letters journal has just published the independent results obtained from both consortiums, gathered from more than a thousand days of data obtained from the pair of Galileo satellites in elongated orbits.

https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Galileo_satellites_prove_Einstein_s_Relativity_Theory_to_highest_accuracy_yet

Online zubenelgenubi

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11003
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Sometimes it feels like Trantor in the time of Hari Seldon
  • Liked: 7293
  • Likes Given: 70106
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #56 on: 12/04/2018 08:44 pm »
Galileo satellites prove Einstein's Relativity Theory to highest accuracy yet

...gathered from more than a thousand days of data obtained from the pair of Galileo satellites in elongated orbits.

https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Galileo_satellites_prove_Einstein_s_Relativity_Theory_to_highest_accuracy_yet

Kudos on making a Space-Age silk purse from a sow's ear! :)
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.) My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!" Yes, there are God-given rights. Do you wish to gainsay the Declaration of Independence?

Offline nzguy

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 228
  • Liked: 186
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #57 on: 01/09/2019 08:46 am »
This article from December has some interesting updates coming for Galileo: https://www.gpsworld.com/galileo-moves-toward-foc/

It was mentioned the July 2018 launched sats were supposed to be online by end of the last year, but have not yet been set healthy. Hopefully they will finish their checkout soon.

They also plan to but the 0201 and 0202 elliptical orbit sats into the operational constellation as part of the 24 satellite FOC constellation after a software update on those sats. I guess this means they reckon there won't be too much degradation vs a constellation with all 24 sats in the right orbits.

The next batch of 12 satellites is under construction for launch starting late 2020 to finish off the constellation.

A bunch of ground infrastructure is getting upgraded over next few years which will bring some new features online (including some that aren't in the published ICDs yet) like the COSPAS-SARSAT return link message, E1 navigation data authentication/anti spoofing, expanded I/NAV data, E6 high accuracy signal (which will also be encrypted with public access to provide extra authentication/anti spoofing).

Finally work has started on the design of the next generation of Galileo satellites with new signals for launch in 2025.

The future looks great for Galileo after all those initial setbacks.

Offline nzguy

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 228
  • Liked: 186
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #58 on: 02/08/2019 12:25 am »
Latest update from Galileo om the four satellites launched in July: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Four_new_Galileos_join_Europe_s_largest_satellite_constellation

So far my receivers still show them as unhealthy and https://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-status/Constellation-Information still shows them under commissioning.

Offline Jester

  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7979
  • Earth
  • Liked: 6533
  • Likes Given: 157
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #59 on: 02/08/2019 11:57 am »
Latest update from Galileo om the four satellites launched in July: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Four_new_Galileos_join_Europe_s_largest_satellite_constellation

So far my receivers still show them as unhealthy and https://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-status/Constellation-Information still shows them under commissioning.

the above is the formal process, the switch over from IOT to "live" is coming ;-)

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #60 on: 02/11/2019 08:11 pm »
USABINIT for four new Satellites today!!!  :)

Quote
GSAT0219    E36    PHM    USABLE    2019002    USABINIT    USABLE AS FROM 2019-02-11
GSAT0220    E13    PHM    USABLE    2019004    USABINIT    USABLE AS FROM 2019-02-11
GSAT0221    E15    PHM    USABLE    2019005    USABINIT    USABLE AS FROM 2019-02-11
GSAT0222    E33    PHM    USABLE    2019003    USABINIT    USABLE AS FROM 2019-02-11

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-status/Constellation-Information


Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #61 on: 03/24/2019 02:51 pm »
22 Galileo-satellites are in operation. Next launch NET 2021 on Ariane 6!

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=31484.msg1926676#msg1926676

GSAT0104 on Slot C05 is not usable since 2014. transmited SAR signals.
GSAT0204 on Slot B03 is not usable since Dec. 2017,in reserve, probably clock problems.
different orbit planes

GSAT0201 and GSAT0202 will never been full members of the constellation. The value range in the almanac for the eccentricity is too small. The launch was 2014.

The problems with the Passive Hydrogen Maser Clocks already occurred in the IOV phase.
GSAT0104 lost both until summer 2013. Clearly recognizable in the NAGU's.

If 4 satellites and 2 Soyuz had been reordered in 2014-2015, the constellation 2019 could be complete.
OHB would not have had to stop production.

So Galileo loses 2 years or more. 2 years operating costs without complete constellation.
And 2 years lifetime for the satellites already launched. 
 :(
« Last Edit: 03/24/2019 07:47 pm by GWR64 »

Offline hektor

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2697
  • Liked: 1192
  • Likes Given: 54
« Last Edit: 07/14/2019 02:25 pm by hektor »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #63 on: 07/14/2019 02:40 pm »
the NAGU:
Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2019026
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2019-07-13 20:15

NAGU TYPE: GENERAL
NAGU NUMBER: 2019026
NAGU SUBJECT: SERVICE OUTAGE
NAGU REFERENCED TO: 2019025
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2019-07-12 01:50
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE, USERS EXPERIENCE A SERVICE OUTAGE. THE SIGNALS ARE NOT TO BE USED.

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-status/Constellation-Information

 ???

Offline hektor

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2697
  • Liked: 1192
  • Likes Given: 54

Online gosnold

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 570
  • Liked: 240
  • Likes Given: 2106
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #65 on: 07/14/2019 07:23 pm »
It's poor design that a ground segment failure at a single location instantly brings down the whole system.

Offline beidou

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 763
  • Mars
  • Liked: 48
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #66 on: 07/14/2019 07:50 pm »
It's poor design that a ground segment failure at a single location instantly brings down the whole system.

The last time for a satellite navigation system completely taken down was for Glonass on April 1st in 2015, however it was recovered only after 12 hours with a reboot...

Offline speedevil

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4406
  • Fife
  • Liked: 2761
  • Likes Given: 3369
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #67 on: 07/14/2019 08:07 pm »
It's poor design that a ground segment failure at a single location instantly brings down the whole system.
Do we know it is a ground segment failure, and not (for example) similar satellite firmware all dying at the same time?

Offline Chasm

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 495
  • Liked: 230
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #68 on: 07/14/2019 11:18 pm »
Nobody knows, or at least they are not talking publicly.

There are (initial?) news reports that a wrong time sync got uploaded.
There are of course also reports that someone pushed the kill switch. (The one that the USA insisted on back in the day, for use in case of war. According to the same sources. So take that with a truck of salt.)


What I would like to know if the degradation warning worked correctly for users of the privileged service.


Looking a bit more there are reports that the problem started during a system upgrade. That apparently makes resolving the issue more complicated. (Unclear which system that is.)
SAR services are unaffected. And the Galileo is just classed as initial service at this time, so who cares anyway. Yeah, right...

Offline hektor

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2697
  • Liked: 1192
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #69 on: 07/15/2019 07:24 am »

Offline nzguy

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 228
  • Liked: 186
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #70 on: 07/15/2019 11:30 am »
From my sources (who have other sources) there was also something weird with the fifth "hidden" batch, which was around the time the first NAGU got released.

I analysed the data from the satellites, and normally they are updated every 10 minutes. However the updated stopped suddenly on Thursday before resuming for a few hours and stopping again.

After that the satellites continued to send the last 8 batches of predicted orbits, for 3 hours at a time. After the 8th batch expired then all GNSS receivers should have stopped using the satellites.

One of the GSA statements mentions that since Galileo is still in "initial operations" versus "full operations" (bit like beta vs final release) that not all ground segment items have redundant systems in place. So i suspect the timing facility that was impacted might not have redundant systems yet.

The GPS documentation mentions that GPS satellites are designed to operate autonomously for over 30 days without ground systems presumably driven by Cold War concerns of nuclear conflict when the system was built. However this has not been used as there has never been such a total failure.

Offline speedevil

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4406
  • Fife
  • Liked: 2761
  • Likes Given: 3369
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #71 on: 07/15/2019 11:36 am »
The GPS documentation mentions that GPS satellites are designed to operate autonomously for over 30 days without ground systems presumably driven by Cold War concerns of nuclear conflict when the system was built. However this has not been used as there has never been such a total failure.
Has there ever been a global GPS outage? I'm not recalling one, or finding anything on search.

Offline nzguy

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 228
  • Liked: 186
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #72 on: 07/15/2019 11:57 am »
No the only other system to have total failure was GLONASS a few years ago and that only lasted less then a day (https://www.gpsworld.com/the-system-glonass-fumbles-forward/.

However there have been individual GPS satellite failures, or ground system bugs such as the UTC correction issue in 2016 (https://www.gps.gov/systems/gps/performance/2016-UTC-offset-anomaly-impact.pdf). As far as I am aware these incidents never affected the navigation service.

EDIT: Just noticed at the bottom of the GPS World article on the GLONASS failure, the section at the bottom "Lag in Recent GPS IIF’s Health Status" mentions that the GPS operators test the 30 day capabilities of the satellites every so often. If Galileo had a similar feature then the satellites could have ridden out this ground segment failure.
« Last Edit: 07/15/2019 12:06 pm by nzguy »

Online Targeteer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6023
  • near hangar 18
  • Liked: 3159
  • Likes Given: 1088
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #73 on: 07/16/2019 05:58 am »
https://rocketrundown.com/europes-galileo-sat-nav-network-suffers-crippling-outage/?fbclid=IwAR0hu2Be_59hB0KqWVXG8UbjLZEs5kqjkbMpfrEfiiw9gkzxX3G-2eLRquQ


Europe’s Galileo Sat-Nav Network Suffers Crippling Outage
By
Andrew Parsonson -
July 15, 2019

Europe’s Galileo satellite navigation network has suffered a prolonged outage due to “a technical incident related to its ground infrastructure.” source The technical incident has crippled almost the entire network, with the exception of the Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) service.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline nzguy

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 228
  • Liked: 186
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #74 on: 07/17/2019 06:36 am »
New data has started to be uploaded to the satellite, but marked as unhealthy.

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/news/galileo-initial-service-recovery-actions-underway

Offline speedevil

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4406
  • Fife
  • Liked: 2761
  • Likes Given: 3369
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #75 on: 07/17/2019 11:29 am »
New data has started to be uploaded to the satellite, but marked as unhealthy.

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/news/galileo-initial-service-recovery-actions-underway

The 'New data' is not mentioned in the above, can you further explain?

Offline Chasm

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 495
  • Liked: 230
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #76 on: 07/17/2019 06:31 pm »
Likely timing data required to make use of the constellation.
As of 24h ago there are user reports on twitter that position data is usable once again.


Updates to news articles say that the problem seems to be in the ground side component. It underwent an update/upgrade/change roughly at the time of the outage.

Question is why the redundant ground segment - supposed to be fully operational at ESOC Oberpfaffenhofen- did not or was not able to provide continued timing data to the satellites.

Online LouScheffer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3369
  • Liked: 6068
  • Likes Given: 828
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #77 on: 07/17/2019 07:38 pm »
I was trying to think of what could have happened that takes so long to fix.  Here's a purely hypothetical hypothesis:

Suppose there was some failure at the master clock facility - the power went out and the backup did not kick in, or the air conditioning failed and the clocks over-heated, or a fire sprinkler malfunctioned and watered all the clocks, or any similar failure that affected all the clocks.  Then you've got to bring the whole clock ensemble up from a cold start, presumably not a quick operation (clock typically achieve the quoted stability after one year of continuous operation in an environment stable to 1/2 degree C).   And you need to wait for the ground clocks to synchronize and measure offsets with each other and external standards (presumable GPS time, GLONASS time, etc)

In the meantime, the satellite clocks are drifting.  In the article RUBIDIUM  ATOMIC  CLOCK  FOR GALILEO it says "To keep  a  goal  accuracy  of  0.5  meter,  an up-load  every  9 hours  would  be  required  for  the ESA-specified  rubidium  clock  and  every  week  in case  of  the  ESA-specified  maser".  Since errors caused by clock drift tend to scale as the square of the elapsed time, this means after even a day or two with no updates, anything that relies on the rubidium clock would have large errors.   This would account for why the first warnings said "degraded performance" but later were changed to "do not use".

Finally, and even more hypothetically, the complete lack of information could be consistent with some embarrassingly simple cause, which they would prefer not to admit until they have the situation under control.


Online LouScheffer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3369
  • Liked: 6068
  • Likes Given: 828
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #78 on: 07/18/2019 01:19 pm »
Appears to be back up, according to their Constellation Information.

And here's the corresponding official navigation update.
« Last Edit: 07/18/2019 02:25 pm by LouScheffer »

Offline Chasm

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 495
  • Liked: 230
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #79 on: 07/18/2019 05:13 pm »
From a slightly more in depth article:

"The technical incident originated by an equipment malfunction in the Galileo ground infrastructure, affecting the calculation of time and orbit predictions, and which are used to compute the navigation message. The malfunction affected different elements on the ground facilities.

[...] We will set an Independent Inquiry Board to identify the root causes of the major incident. "



via: https://www.gsa.europa.eu/newsroom/news/galileo-initial-services-have-now-been-restored

Offline russianhalo117

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8744
  • Liked: 4646
  • Likes Given: 768
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #80 on: 08/02/2019 04:27 am »
Ongoing upgrade authorised under name system build 1.5.1 started in February 2019 with completion expected at the end of the year. Supposed to be seamless transition of G1G in preparation for rollout of G2G and EGNOS v3 follow on ground and space segments but could be related to last month's issues.
« Last Edit: 08/02/2019 04:31 am by russianhalo117 »

Offline russianhalo117

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8744
  • Liked: 4646
  • Likes Given: 768
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #81 on: 08/02/2019 04:30 am »
First G1G (Galileo First Generation) Batch 3 Sat payload arrived at OHB from SSTL. Name is Patrick.
https://www.sstl.co.uk/media-hub/latest-news/2019/first-galileo-batch-3-payload-patrick%E2%80%9D-reaches-ohb

Offline nzguy

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 228
  • Liked: 186
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #82 on: 08/05/2019 08:31 am »
I wonder why they didn't extend the existing contract to quickly order two more satellites to replace the two placed into the wrong orbit, rather then letting the production line stop, and start up again.

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #83 on: 11/17/2019 12:11 pm »
Should one worry about Galileo IOV PFM?

last NAGU
Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2019033
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2019-10-30 17:45
   
NAGU TYPE: UNP_UNUFN
NAGU NUMBER: 2019033
NAGU SUBJECT: UNAVAILABLE FROM 2019-10-29 UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE
NAGU REFERENCED TO: N/A
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2019-10-29 18:49
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0101
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 11
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL
   
EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0101 (ALL SIGNALS) IS UNAVAILABLE SINCE 2019-10-29 BEGINNING 18:49 UTC UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-service-status/constellation-information

P.S. :
In the almanac of 11/01/2019 GSAT 0101 / SV ID 11 still has signal status normal.
And from 11/05/2019 Galileo SV ID 11 has disappeared from the almanac.
« Last Edit: 11/17/2019 01:35 pm by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #84 on: 11/28/2019 08:34 pm »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #86 on: 12/27/2019 10:06 am »
First G1G (Galileo First Generation) Batch 3 Sat payload arrived at OHB from SSTL. Name is Patrick.
https://www.sstl.co.uk/media-hub/latest-news/2019/first-galileo-batch-3-payload-patrick%E2%80%9D-reaches-ohb

Strange coincidence "Patrick" is the last of 27 Galileo satellites with names. (as far as I know)
At the launch, Patrick's country Great Britain will most likely no longer an EU member. (Brexit)  :(
No. 28 Croatia, was not involved in the drawing competition 2011, is EU-member since 2013.

Edit:
P.S.
I see right now that the "Galileo Drawing Competition 2019" for children from Croatia, Norway and Switzerland is running. So the 3 following Galileo satellites will also become children's names.
https://ec.europa.eu/growth/sectors/space/galileo/drawing-competition_en
« Last Edit: 12/28/2019 01:36 pm by GWR64 »

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21698
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 8530
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #87 on: 01/24/2020 06:44 am »
Galileo now replying to SOS messages worldwide
23/01/2020


As well as providing global navigation services, Europe’s Galileo satellite constellation is contributing to saving more than 2000 lives annually by relaying SOS messages to first responders. And from now on the satellites will reply to these messages, assuring people in danger that help is on the way.

http://www.esa.int/Applications/Navigation/Galileo_now_replying_to_SOS_messages_worldwide
Jacques :-)

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #88 on: 02/02/2020 02:11 pm »
From a slightly more in depth article:

"The technical incident originated by an equipment malfunction in the Galileo ground infrastructure, affecting the calculation of time and orbit predictions, and which are used to compute the navigation message. The malfunction affected different elements on the ground facilities.

[...] We will set an Independent Inquiry Board to identify the root causes of the major incident. "



via: https://www.gsa.europa.eu/newsroom/news/galileo-initial-services-have-now-been-restored

In the Galileo Performance Report Q3/2019 is a little annex about the July outage. (ANNEX A)

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/sites/default/files/sites/all/files/Galileo-IS-OS-Quarterly-Performance_Report-Q3-2019.pdf

« Last Edit: 02/02/2020 02:14 pm by GWR64 »

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #89 on: 03/11/2020 01:07 am »
ESA and the European Commission preorder four more Ariane 6 launches

Quote
The European Space Agency (ESA) has finalized its preorder for four more launches on Ariane 6, along with an initial payment.

Using Ariane 62, the light version of the new European launcher, these missions will be carried out on behalf of the European Commission to continue the deployment and operational ramp-up of the high-performance Galileo satellite navigation system.

Arianespace announced today a preorder from the European Space Agency (ESA), on behalf of the European Commission (DG Grow), for four launches using the Ariane 6 rocket. Planned to start in January 2022, these launches will orbit eight satellites from Batch 3 to support the final deployment of the Galileo constellation and the replacement of certain satellites.

These four launches reserved for Ariane 62 will be confirmed after the European Commission finalizes its budget for the period 2021-2027, which covers these launches. The terms and conditions of this order have already been approved by ESA and the European Commission, and an initial payment has been made for this preorder.

Quote
Ariane 6’s backlog of orders already includes nine iconic institutional and commercial missions, clearly confirming the European launcher’s ability to adapt to a fast-changing market.

The nine orders include two scientific missions for ESA, Euclid (also compatible with Soyuz) and JUICE (also compatible with Ariane 5), CSO3 for the French Ministry of the Armed Forces, two Galileo launches (also compatible with Soyuz) for ESA on behalf of the European Commission, and four for the private operators OneWeb, Viasat and Eutelsat.

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21698
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 8530
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #90 on: 03/30/2020 08:10 am »
ESA’s Navigation Directorate supporting EGNOS and Galileo services continuity

30/03/2020

In response to the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic, ESA’s Directorate of Navigation has shifted to teleworking while also ensuring the continuity of essential tasks, in particular the continued delivery of positioning, navigation, and timing services of the European satellite navigation system Galileo and the augmentation system EGNOS.

The national, local and industrial decisions on travel, meetings and quarantine are impacting the ability to deliver all ongoing commitments, so measures are being taken to minimise their impact.


Priority has been given to ensure continued operations of both EGNOS and Galileo, so  the ESA Navigation Directorate has been supporting the European Global Navigation Satellite System Agency, GSA – the operator of Galileo and EGNOS, on behalf of the European Commission.

In addition to ensuring business continuity in critical areas, the team is maintaining constant contact with the various stakeholders and several measures have been taken as follows: 

The first two satellites of Galileo’s Batch 3 are currently based at the ESTEC Test Centre in the Netherlands, for engineering tests ahead of launch. This test campaign has been suspended, based on the medical advice that too high a concentration of people would be needed on-site if testing were to continue.

These stored satellites are being monitored by staff visiting ESTEC every few days, to verify that all is in order.
Other Galileo related testing continues with the aim of supporting future launches. ESTEC-based lifetime testing of the next set of rubidium atomic clocks is set to continue, involving on-site monitoring every few days.

Testing of passive hydrogen maser atomic clocks is also continuing, at the ESA-VSC High-Power Radio Frequency Laboratory in Valencia, Spain. The University of Valencia, hosting the Lab, has given permission for a few specialists to oversee the tests.

In addition, the Directorate team has shifted to teleworking, using video and audio-conferences to continue meetings with the industries involved and thereby minimise the impact on the deliveries of EGNOS upgrades, Galileo Batch 3 satellites, and the preparatory work for Galileo Second Generation.

The navigation R&D projects undertaken under the Directorate’s Navigation Innovation and Support Programme (NAVISP) are continuing although at a somewhat slower pace, given the crisis. So are the Satellite Navigation projects financed by the EU’s Horizon 2020 programme and which develop future technology for the EU satellite navigation projects.

Paul Verhoef, ESA Director of Navigation, comments: “Confronted with this unprecedented situation, our efforts are focussing on business continuity and supporting the GSA with services provision of Galileo and EGNOS, while taking all necessary measures to protect our personnel. An impact assessment will only be possible when we see the end of the restrictions in the various European countries. For the time being, stay home, stay healthy, is the priority whereas however we are in close contact with industry to try and keep momentum on the projects that are underway.”

http://www.esa.int/Applications/Navigation/ESA_s_Navigation_Directorate_supporting_EGNOS_and_Galileo_services_continuity
Jacques :-)

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #91 on: 04/10/2020 07:27 am »
Galileo IOV FM03 may have lost its two hydrogen atomic clocks (PHM).
On March 16, he went into maintenance unplanned.
Until then, a PHM was in operation. Several maintenance extensions followed.
It started operating again on April 6th, but with a Rubidium atomic clock (RAFS).

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2020010
« Last Edit: 04/10/2020 07:28 am by GWR64 »

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21698
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 8530
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #92 on: 01/11/2021 09:49 am »
How far we've come: Galileo’s 500th ESA Engineering Board

11/01/2021

The end of 2020 marked a notable milestone for Europe’s Galileo First Generation, as the programme chalked up its 500th ESA Engineering Board.

Since the first such ‘G1’ Engineering Board in 2008 a total of 26 Galileo satellites have been built, tested and flown, with a further 12 ‘Batch 3’ satellites set to join them in orbit during the coming decade – these satellites are currently being finalised at OHB Systems in Bremen, Germany, then tested at ESA’s ESTEC Test Centre in the Netherlands.

The Galileo system’s globe-spanning ground system has also been put in place and made operational. Galileo began initial operations in December 2016 and is today the world’s single most accurate satellite navigation system, serving more than 1.5 billion smartphones and devices. But all that effort owes its origins to the regular sequence of G1 Engineering Boards.

Much like a modern version of the Agora public square of ancient Greece, Galileo’s ESA Engineering Board is the forum where technical experts regularly meet with a clear objective: maintaining, reviewing and updating the Galileo Project technical baseline, the ‘System Technical Requirements Baseline’ or STRB for short.

This STRB drives the implementation of the Galileo System and its infrastructure, namely the space and ground segments, along with associated interfaces and operations. All in all, the G1 system technical specification under ESA responsibility adds up to more than 22 000 separate requirements – both unclassified and classified in nature, with considerable interdependencies which all need to be controlled in configuration.

The Galileo G1 Engineering Board is chaired by ESA in accordance with its role as Galileo System Design Authority, assigned to it by the European Commission.

For more than 12 years now, ESA and industry engineers from all relevant disciplines – covering system, satellite, ground, signal, radio-navigation, RAMS (reliability, availability, maintainability and safety), security and infrastructure – have put their best skills at the disposal of this Board. It continues to be a crucial enabler for further robustness improvements and new service evolutions.

The G1 Engineering Board meetings will continue into the future, complemented with the Engineering Boards for the new Galileo Second Generation (G2 satellites are planned for later this decade) which are already well underway.

https://www.esa.int/Applications/Navigation/How_far_we_ve_come_Galileo_s_500th_ESA_Engineering_Board
Jacques :-)

Offline bolun

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3541
  • Europe
  • Liked: 950
  • Likes Given: 110
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #93 on: 01/15/2021 10:47 am »
UK industry bids farewell to EU's Galileo system

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-55665537

Offline PM3

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1468
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1827
  • Likes Given: 1286
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #94 on: 01/23/2021 07:22 pm »
Order for another 12 Galileo satellites goes to Airbus and Thales Alenia, OHB lost the competition.

https://www.faz.net/aktuell/wirtschaft/fuchs-ueber-das-aus-fuer-ohb-bei-den-galileo-satelliten-17158166.html
« Last Edit: 01/27/2021 12:16 pm by Jester »
"Never, never be afraid of the truth." -- Jim Bridenstine

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #95 on: 01/24/2021 02:33 am »
Order for another 12 Galileo satellites goes to Airbus and Thales Alenia, OHB lost the competition.

https://www.faz.net/aktuell/wirtschaft/fuchs-ueber-das-aus-fuer-ohb-bei-den-galileo-satelliten-17158166.html

Specifically, they lost the tender for the first 12 Second Generation Galileo.
« Last Edit: 01/27/2021 12:16 pm by Jester »

Offline deadman1204

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1746
  • USA
  • Liked: 1453
  • Likes Given: 2470
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #96 on: 02/04/2021 01:26 pm »
uhhhh what? They chose the vendor for the better value and price? Isn't that what they were supposed to do?

Online edzieba

  • Virtual Realist
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5982
  • United Kingdom
  • Liked: 9151
  • Likes Given: 38
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #97 on: 02/05/2021 03:24 pm »
It's notable because OHB were previously the prime contractor for all 34 (22 launched, 12 awaiting launch) operational Galileo satellites winning 3 (IIRC) separate contracts for each batch, as a partnership with SSTL. After Brexit made UK-based SSTL ineligible to bid for Galileo contracts, OHB still made a bid but it was unsuccessful.

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8356
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 2539
  • Likes Given: 8234
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #98 on: 02/08/2021 04:03 pm »
uhhhh what? They chose the vendor for the better value and price? Isn't that what they were supposed to do?
Where did you read any comments on value or otherwise? The thread went by what was publicly available at the time. First it was known that OHB, the manufacturer of all G1 FOC satellites had lost their bid. A couple of days later it was announced that Thales/Airbus got the contract and that it was, in fact, G2. I failed to read any statement in the European Commission site, even though all news sites cited the EC as announcing the results of the tender.
I really don't understand your comment.

Offline eeergo

-DaviD-

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21698
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 8530
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #100 on: 04/19/2021 08:40 am »
More than two billion smartphones, with users worldwide are now making use of Europe's Galileo navigation satellite constellation. But how do satellites thousands of kilometres away in space manage to tell you where you are and where you're going? Simply being so far away is part of the answer - learn the details of the world's most precise navigation system in this new video.





Jacques :-)

Offline friendly3

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 271
  • Liege. BELGIUM.
  • Liked: 306
  • Likes Given: 8533
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #101 on: 04/19/2021 07:02 pm »
More than two billion smartphones, with users worldwide are now making use of Europe's Galileo navigation satellite constellation.

I don't believe this for one second, that's completely preposterous!
« Last Edit: 04/19/2021 07:03 pm by friendly3 »

Offline Asteroza

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2799
  • Liked: 1063
  • Likes Given: 32
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #102 on: 04/19/2021 10:33 pm »
More than two billion smartphones, with users worldwide are now making use of Europe's Galileo navigation satellite constellation.

I don't believe this for one second, that's completely preposterous!

Perhaps you can avail yourself to reading about actual smartphone GNSS, but to save you the trouble, for the last 5-7 years, all smartphones (android, iPhone, and "other") equipped with a GNSS chip (popularly called "GPS") have been able to use multiple satellite navigation constellations, and more recently use them simultaneously. This largely started I believe around the time russia required all phones sold with GNSS capability to support GLONASS, and Apple complied to retain the russian market. Thus iPhones (which is a rather large market share on their own, suddenly supported GPS and GLONASS. If I remember correctly, in the effort to do so, to reduce engineering time, they also installed support for Galileo and Beidou (which were in initial trail stages at the time), along with the various regional WAAS systems coming online (believe india also was proposing similar legislation, thus Apple slotted in their regional system to cover another large market). With Apple taking the lead, most smartphone GNSS chipmakers followed suit, and by default, most smartphones sold became multi-system compatible in relatively short order. That's not to say users were specifically choosing Galileo though. However, android smartphones do have the capability to prioritize which constellation to use, so EU specific models can be found with Galileo set as default by makers. Though simultaneous multi-system chips typically still default to prioritizing GPS.

The more interesting statistic would not be smartphones, but any systems using special high accuracy signals from Galileo, such as survey/sensor systems and military. I imagine those EU specific models are still not that many, or are simply using multi-system chips with changeable settings.

Offline friendly3

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 271
  • Liege. BELGIUM.
  • Liked: 306
  • Likes Given: 8533
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #103 on: 04/19/2021 10:44 pm »
There aren't "more than two billion" smartphones used for GPS navigation worldwide, I repeat that is preposterous.
There may be billions of smartphones equipped with the chip but all the rest is an obvious overstatement.
Where are you from?

Offline Asteroza

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2799
  • Liked: 1063
  • Likes Given: 32
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #104 on: 04/20/2021 11:23 pm »
There aren't "more than two billion" smartphones used for GPS navigation worldwide, I repeat that is preposterous.
There may be billions of smartphones equipped with the chip but all the rest is an obvious overstatement.
Where are you from?

Most recent smartphones usually default to active GNSS use when equipped (in a coarse location mode), and will use Galileo to augment the ellipse of probability when other constellations have poor availability/geometry, so the 2 billion figure is not without merit. While the user themselves may have never opened a map app, the phone knows your rough location using GNSS, and actively uses that for other purposes such as advertising when viewing a webpage, looking at app content, personalizing search results, and prioritizing wifi/cellular usage based on expected proximity while on the move. The original statement does not necessarily imply human direct navigation use, and includes these automatic machine oriented location service uses of GNSS.

The wording implies 2 billion active users however, which might be a bit of a stretch (there appear to be over 3 billion active smartphone users who have at least one smartphone, approaching 4 billion this year, but they may not necessarily have smartphones with the appropriate chip due to age), when a more correct phrasing might have been "have used" rather than "now making use of". 2 billion active concurrent users would be a stretch, but then again, a lot of people keep their smartphones on all day and night.

Why is my location relevant to this discussion? Are you trying to make an appeal to authority by virtue of being an EU resident, implied by your profile listed residence as Belgium?

Would a wording like "over 2 billion smartphones, located not only in the EU but globally, have recently made use of Galileo in some capacity" been more factual for you?

Offline beidou

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 763
  • Mars
  • Liked: 48
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #105 on: 04/21/2021 12:21 pm »
More than two billion smartphones, with users worldwide are now making use of Europe's Galileo navigation satellite constellation. But how do satellites thousands of kilometres away in space manage to tell you where you are and where you're going? Simply being so far away is part of the answer - learn the details of the world's most precise navigation system in this new video.




How much Galileo budget has been wasted on this outreach activities? I really hope these people stop this kind of nonsense propaganda?

Online Hobbes-22

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 938
  • Acme Engineering
    • Acme Engineering
  • Liked: 583
  • Likes Given: 482
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #106 on: 04/21/2021 01:40 pm »
...says the user advertising another GNSS with his username?
 ;D

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21698
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 8530
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #107 on: 05/28/2021 10:01 am »
ESA signs contract for new generation of Galileo
28/05/2021


Acting on behalf of the European Commission, ESA has signed two contracts for an overall amount of €1.47 billion, to design and build the first batch of the second generation of Europe’s Galileo navigation satellites.

Following an intense process of open competition, these contracts have been awarded to Thales Alenia Space (Italy) and Airbus Defence & Space (Germany) to create two independent families of satellites amounting to 12 Galileo Second Generation satellites in total.

“Galileo is a major success for Europe, and these contracts ensure that it is going to be around for a long time to come,” comments Paul Verhoef, ESA Director of Navigation. “The Galileo Second Generation will represent a further step forward with the use of many innovative technologies to guarantee unprecedented precision, robustness and flexibility of the system for the benefit of users worldwide.”

Galileo is Europe’s civil global satellite navigation constellation, currently the world’s most precise satnav system, offering metre-scale accuracy to more than 2 billion users around the globe. With improved accuracy, the new generation should be able to offer decimetre-scale precision positioning to all.

These Galileo Second Generation (G2) satellites will revolutionise the Galileo fleet, joining the 26 first generation Galileo satellites in orbit today plus the 12 ‘Batch 3’ satellites currently in production and testing. The first launch of these Batch 3 satellites will take place later this year.

The new G2 satellites will be constructed in a short time scale with their first launch expected in less than four years, allowing them to commence operations in space as soon as possible.

The G2 satellites will gradually join the existing constellation, but will be much larger than existing satellites. Using electric propulsion for the first time, and hosting an enhanced navigation antenna, their fully digital payloads are being designed to be easily reconfigured in orbit, enabling them to actively respond to the evolving needs of users with novel signals and services.

New on-board technologies include electric propulsion to propel the satellites from the orbit in which they will be launched to the final operational orbits, allowing two satellites to be launched at once despite their increased mass. Inter-satellite links between the satellites will let them routinely cross-check their performance and reduce their dependency on the availability of ground installations.

The satellites will also feature a more powerful navigation antenna and advanced jamming and spoofing protection mechanisms to safeguard Galileo signals.

Thanks to G2, it will be possible for navigation devices such as smartphones to acquire the signal faster and access services more quickly upon switching on their devices, with lower power consumption. This will open up new perspectives for many new devices to offer positioning capabilities, a true revolution for emerging self-driving cars, autonomous drones and the whole ‘Internet of things’.

G2 will also offer enhanced services for search and rescue, including two-way communications to the person in trouble. And a new emergency communications capability will enable authorities to warn users in affected regions of imminent dangers such as tsunamis or earthquakes. Such warnings could be sent anywhere on Earth, independently of telecommunication providers, by using Galileo navigation signals as a one-way messaging service.

Overall, the G2 satellites will incorporate numerous technology upgrades, developed through EU and ESA research and development programmes. But the Galileo G2 system will result from a series of seamless upgrades and changes to the G1 system currently in place, without interruption to any of its services.

The Galileo system will be operated by the EU Agency for the Space Programme, EUSPA, based in Prague. ESA and EUSPA are partnering on the development and operations of Galileo.

ESA is in charge of the design, development, procurement, qualification of Galileo satellites and the associated ground infrastructure on behalf of the European Union, the system owner.

https://www.esa.int/Applications/Navigation/ESA_signs_contract_for_new_generation_of_Galileo
Jacques :-)

Offline Asteroza

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2799
  • Liked: 1063
  • Likes Given: 32
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #108 on: 05/30/2021 10:06 pm »
The creator of PowerDNS, who is an all round technologist it seems, is somewhat spearheading an open source reverse engineering/decoding of the Galileo high accuracy signal which recently started up.

https://twitter.com/PowerDNS_Bert/status/1396849457656893446

Seems to have made some progress.

https://twitter.com/PowerDNS_Bert/status/1399015978596540425


Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38583
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31756
  • Likes Given: 7744
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #109 on: 06/02/2021 07:20 am »
It appears quite a lot of explanations sorta skip over important practical details. Lots of pointers go back to _Theory and Practice of Error Control Codes, R. E. Blahut_ (1983).

A book that I used quite a bit of back when! They are looking at various Reed-Solomon (RS) error control codes. I recently designed a BCH decoder which uses the same Galois Field type arithmetic as RS codes. Its easy once you know how. :-) The decoding algorithms though are at another level of complexity!
« Last Edit: 06/02/2021 07:21 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21698
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 8530
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #110 on: 07/20/2021 09:12 am »
Galileo Second Generation proof-of-concept testing begins
19/07/2021

The first Galileo Second Generation hardware has begun testing, with test versions of the satellites’ navigation payloads undergoing evaluation by Airbus Defence and Space at their Ottobrunn facility in Germany and by Thales Alenia Space at ESA’s ESTEC technical centre in the Netherlands.

These testbed versions of these new navigation payloads designed by the two companies are undergoing testing of their respective navigation antennas to check whether they meet the ambitious performance levels set for the coming generation of Europe’s satellite navigation system.

Known as the Galileo Payload Testbeds, or GPLTBs for short, these are development models of the navigation payloads intended for the Galileo Second Generation (G2) satellites.

The main difference is that instead of being assembled from space-ready components like an actual satellite payload, the GPLTBs are built up from ‘breadboard’ electronic parts placed in test racks, with a proof-of-concept version of a navigation antenna attached.

“The goal with these test campaigns are to prove their design concept early, and anticipate any technical issues that might arise as early as possible,” explain Cédric Magueur, ESA’s Payload Manager for the Thales G2 satellites.

“These campaigns also allow to develop and validate new performance measurements concepts for these new generation of complex navigation payloads,” adds Dirk Hannes, ESA’s Payload Manager for the Airbus G2 satellites. “This will allow us to optimize the production efficiency of the Flight Model series.”

Cédric adds: “Results from the testing will feed into the up-coming Preliminary Design Review for the new satellites, backing up the analyses by the companies with solid measurements. Such early testing also supports the ambitious timescale for the development and construction of G2 satellites, with the first satellites planned to reach orbit by the middle of this decade.”

Galileo is Europe’s civil global satellite navigation constellation, currently the world’s most precise satnav system, offering metre-scale accuracy to more than 2 billion users around the globe. There are 26 Galileo satellites in orbit, scheduled to be joined by other 12 satellites starting to be deployed by the end of this year.

Next will come the first 12 G2 satellites, featuring enhanced navigation signals and fully digital payloads. This new generation will be made up of two independent families of satellites meeting the same performance requirements, produced by Thales Alenia Space in Italy and Airbus Defence and Space in Germany.

Airbus Defence and Space’s GPLTB is currently undergoing radiated testing at the company’s Ottobrunn facility, inside a Compact Antenna Test Range (CATR). Meanwhile the Thales Alenia Space GPLTB is about to start testing inside ESTEC’s own Hybrid European Radio Frequency and Antenna Test Zone (Hertz) chamber.

These are metal-walled chambers kept isolated from external radio interference, whose inner walls are studded with foam pyramids to minimise radio frequency signal reflections, mimicking the void of space.

 “Up until now all GPLTB testing has taken place by plugging them into test boards,” adds Cédric. “These test campaigns mark the first time that their performances will be confirmed in terms of radiating signals.”

Radio-frequency radiation forming of the navigation signals takes place through a combination of digital processing and interaction with the antenna, so practical radio frequency testing is essential to check the true payload performance.

Cédric explains: “In our first phase we will perform near-field measurements directly around the antenna to measure all the characteristics of the signal shape, to check it matches previous conductance tests. Then via computation we can derive its far-field performance.

“In the second test phase the actual far-field measurements will be performed, using another feature of the chambers. Thanks to a pair of specially-shaped paraboloid reflectors, the signal from the testbed can be reshaped as if it has travelled the very long distance that actual Galileo signals need to stretch, all the way from an altitude of 23 222 km down to Earth’s surface.”

Dirk comments:“On the Airbus side the methodology is substantially the same, except the far-field measurement are currently being performed, to be followed by the near-field

https://www.esa.int/Applications/Navigation/Galileo_Second_Generation_proof-of-concept_testing_begins
Jacques :-)

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21698
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 8530
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #111 on: 07/20/2021 09:13 am »
Thales Galileo Second Generation satellites
19/07/2021

Galileo Second Generation will be made up of two independent families of satellites meeting the same performance requirements, produced by Thales Alenia Space in Italy and Airbus Defence and Space in Germany.
Jacques :-)

Offline Rik ISS-fan

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1512
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 604
  • Likes Given: 210
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #112 on: 07/20/2021 09:29 pm »
The Galileo satellite constellation consists of a minimal of 24 satellites; distributed in three MEO 23.222km circular planes (120deg between the planes). The planes are called A, B and C, and satellite position in the planes are numbered 01-08. There are 26 satellites launched, two of them in wrong orbits FOC FM01 & FM02; the VS09 launch. And satellites two aren't active any more, because of clock failures IOC FM4 @C05 and FOC FM04 @B03. Thus the system isn't complete with only 22 functional (& correctly positioned) satellites. the IOC satellites were launched in Okt.2011 and Okt. 2012 (VS01: plane B & VS03: plane C).
A launch can only deliver satellites to one of the planes (A, B or C), thus two launches are needed to finally reach full capacity of the constellation. I expect the next two Soyuz launches will go to plane B and C. This will complete the constellation with one IOC satellite in plane B & C as reserve (at beyond design life)
There are 12 FOC/GSAT02xx left to launch, after these the constellation will transition to generation 2 satellites.
The Gen.2 satellites are a lot larger than the IOC/FOC and there will be a Airbus and ThalesAlenia version. Most likely each got contracted to produce 6 satellites. Now I'm wondering if EUSPA=>Arianespace will launch the Gen.2 mixed, or clustered. Thus one of both satellites at each launch or two of one design. We shall see what is decided.

Funny side note: EUSPA is stationed in Prague, Czech Republic.
And instead of: European Union Agency for the Space Programme;
more logically would be: European Union Space Projects Agency.
EU Space Projects are: Galileo/GNSS; Copernicus and in the future GovSatCom. In my opinion the whole EU space program also includes the Horizon projects and the EIC Prize. But these are run by other EU agencies. 
« Last Edit: 07/20/2021 10:04 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #113 on: 09/13/2021 06:25 pm »
Problems with GSAT0210 (FOC-FM10) SVID E01.
The stupid thing is, the satellite is in plane A. The other defective satellites GSAT0104 in plane C and GSAT0204 in plane B.
So let's hope that GSAT0210 can be used again soon. Otherwise it will take longer for a replacement to be ready for use.

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/sites/default/files/sites/all/files/Galileo-service-notice-07-v1.0.pdf

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2021012
« Last Edit: 09/13/2021 06:29 pm by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #114 on: 09/22/2021 09:03 am »
GSAT-0210 is usable again.
https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2021015
Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2021015
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2021-09-21 18:00

NAGU TYPE: USABLE
NAGU NUMBER: 2021015
NAGU SUBJECT: USABLE AS FROM 2021-09-21
NAGU REFERENCED TO: 2021012
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2021-09-21 12:38
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0210
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 01
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0210 (ALL SIGNALS) IS USABLE SINCE/AS OF 2021-09-21 BEGINNING 12:38 UTC. PAYLOAD ON PHM CLOCK. GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0210 (ALL SIGNALS) WAS UNAVAILABLE FROM 2021-09-05 BEGINNING 06:00 UTC.

Something strange is, in the Galileo Almanac of the last days, SVID 01 (GSAT 0210) was always marked as "healthy".

Offline bolun

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3541
  • Europe
  • Liked: 950
  • Likes Given: 110
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #115 on: 10/12/2021 10:11 am »
ITALIAN SPACE AGENCY AND QASCOM TO BRING ITALY AND GALILEO TO THE MOON

Quote
An innovative GPS and Galileo receiver will provide positioning services towards the Moon and on its surface.

The project NEIL (Navigation Early Investigation on Lunar surface) will experiment satellite-based positioning on the lunar surface. The project is at the center of an agreement between the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and NASA, linked to the CLPS 19-D mission (NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Service, Task Order 19) in which the US Space Agency is planning to land to the “Mare Crisium” basin of the Moon in 2023. The NEIL payload, subject matter of the contract signed between ASI and Qascom Srl, will be integrated into the experimentation called Lunar GNSS Receiver Experiment (LuGRE), an ASI/NASA cooperation framework with the objective to develop activities in lunar and cislunar environments.

For the first time in history, the positioning based on GPS and Galileo signals will be tested at almost 400.000 km distance from Earth. This is the first experiment of its kind considering that the previous limit was experimented by NASA at a distance of approximately 200.000 km. The mission, in addition to the NEIL payload, will also bring to the Moon other 9 scientific experiments. Planned in 2023, it is foreseen to be launched with Falcon 9 of Space X.

Offline nzguy

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 228
  • Liked: 186
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #116 on: 11/08/2021 11:18 am »
Has someone worked out where they moved GSAT0206 to?

https://twitter.com/GalileoSats/status/1456655641213276164

Online Hobbes-22

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 938
  • Acme Engineering
    • Acme Engineering
  • Liked: 583
  • Likes Given: 482
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #117 on: 11/08/2021 01:22 pm »
Any word on what they did to reduce the potential for clock failures in these 2nd generation sats?

Offline Josh_from_Canada

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 542
  • Saskatchewan Canada
  • Liked: 577
  • Likes Given: 182
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #118 on: 11/29/2021 05:58 pm »
It was mentioned in this video that Ariane 6 launches will start with launch #14 (the forth of this follow on batch). So three launches on Soyuz followed by three launches on Ariane 6 to deploy these 12 satellites.
Launches Seen: Atlas V OA-7, Falcon 9 Starlink 6-4, Falcon 9 CRS-28,

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #119 on: 02/05/2022 01:12 pm »
Galileo IOV FM3 is missing. GSAT0103, SV ID E19, Slot C04
unplanned, the NAGU was published later.

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2022005

Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2022005
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2022-02-04 12:45

NAGU TYPE: UNP_UNUFN
NAGU NUMBER: 2022005
NAGU SUBJECT: UNAVAILABLE FROM 2022-02-03 UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE
NAGU REFERENCED TO: N/A
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2022-02-03 23:44
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0103
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 19
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0103 (ALL SIGNALS) IS UNAVAILABLE SINCE 2022-02-03 BEGINNING 23:44 UTC UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.
« Last Edit: 02/05/2022 03:19 pm by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #120 on: 02/21/2022 05:29 pm »
GSAT 0103 works again, now on rubidium atomic clock
No problem, the IOVs are not among the satellites with the faulty rubidium clocks.

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2022008

Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2022008
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2022-02-21 10:45

NAGU TYPE: USABLE
NAGU NUMBER: 2022008
NAGU SUBJECT: USABLE AS FROM 2022-02-20
NAGU REFERENCED TO: 2022007
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2022-02-20 12:51
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0103
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 19
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0103 (ALL SIGNALS) IS USABLE SINCE/AS OF 2022-02-20 BEGINNING 12:51 UTC. PAYLOAD ON RAFS CLOCK. GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0103 (ALL SIGNALS) WAS UNAVAILABLE FROM 2022-02-03 BEGINNING 23:44 UTC.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 05:56 pm by GWR64 »

Offline russianhalo117

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8744
  • Liked: 4646
  • Likes Given: 768

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #122 on: 05/14/2022 08:33 am »
Problems with GSAT0210 (FOC-FM10) SVID E01.
The stupid thing is, the satellite is in plane A. The other defective satellites GSAT0104 in plane C and GSAT0204 in plane B.
So let's hope that GSAT0210 can be used again soon. Otherwise it will take longer for a replacement to be ready for use.
...

Unfortunately, GSAT 0210 has been out of service for 2 weeks.
https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2022015
A replacement will likely not be usable until 2024. (with launch on Ariane 6)  :( 
Currently are in plane
A: 7 satellites usable
B: 8 satellites usable, later maybe 9 with GSAT 0224 (ID E10) on intermediate slot B15
C: 7 satellites usable
« Last Edit: 05/14/2022 08:49 am by GWR64 »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1512
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 604
  • Likes Given: 210
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #123 on: 05/14/2022 10:41 am »
So there aren't even the minimal required 24 operational satellites. 8 in each of the three planes. While the plan was for two spaces in each plane. And this won't change for a couple of years.
To make the situation worse, the live expectancy of the Galileo satellites was 12 years, the IOV satellites reach this age by 2023/'24.
AFAIK GSAT:2023 & 2024 were initially intended to replace (IOC) 0101 & 0102, but 0204 failed early so needed replacement sooner (all plane B). The first two FOC satellites went to the wrong orbit removing 0201&0202 from the fleet. The other two IOC satellites 0103 & 0104 only have 0103 operating in plane C because 0104 has clock problems.
The next youngest satellites are 0203 & 0204 plane B, 0205 & 0206 plane A (with 2010 also down in A), 0208 & 0209 in plane C. These were launched in 2015, need to be replaced way before 2027.

I think Astris is needed sooner, to deliver 4 Gen1 batch 3 satellites to one plane, like was don with Ariane 5ES.
Europe and the EU are for clean space, right? Is leaving a ULPM in MEO orbit in accordance to this principle. With an Astris kick-stage the ULPM can be deorbited, and the Astris stays in MEO. I think for both the remaining Galileo gen.1 satellites and for the Gen.2 satellites the Ariane 62+Astris is the preferred launcher.
Ariane 62 launches the satellites + Astris into a MEO transfer orbit. The Astris propels the satellites into the MEO orbit. (perigee increase) 
« Last Edit: 05/14/2022 11:00 am by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #124 on: 05/20/2022 04:30 pm »
GSAT0210 is transmitting signals. SV ID 01 is back in the almanac and listed as healthy.
A "healthy" NAGU does not yet exist.

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #125 on: 05/26/2022 07:05 pm »
Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2022018
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2022-05-26 09:45

NAGU TYPE: USABLE
NAGU NUMBER: 2022018
NAGU SUBJECT: USABLE AS FROM 2022-05-25
NAGU REFERENCED TO: 2022015
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2022-05-25 16:11
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0210
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 01
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0210 (ALL SIGNALS) IS USABLE SINCE/AS OF 2022-05-25 BEGINNING 16:11 UTC. PAYLOAD ON PHM CLOCK. GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0210 (ALL SIGNALS) WAS UNAVAILABLE FROM 2022-04-29 BEGINNING 02:38 UTC.

23  :)

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #126 on: 07/02/2022 06:58 pm »
3 weeks planned maintenance on GSAT 0103.
This satellite often causes problems lately.
Galileo needs a launch vehicle, now!
Would a Falcon 9 launch work? The orbit is challenging. ASDS landing or expendable?
Could the 2nd stage be removed from Galileo orbit?  ???

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2022025

Offline Zed_Noir

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5426
  • Canada
  • Liked: 1790
  • Likes Given: 1289
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #127 on: 07/02/2022 07:34 pm »
3 weeks planned maintenance on GSAT 0103.
This satellite often causes problems lately.
Galileo needs a launch vehicle, now!
Would a Falcon 9 launch work? The orbit is challenging. ASDS landing or expendable?
Could the 2nd stage be removed from Galileo orbit?  ???

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2022025
If transport for the satellites can be arranged. There are at least 2 spare sets of Falcon Heavies available for whatever challenging orbit is required. If the Falcon 9 lacks sufficient performance.  ;)

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #128 on: 07/03/2022 06:29 am »
3 weeks planned maintenance on GSAT 0103.
This satellite often causes problems lately.
Galileo needs a launch vehicle, now!
Would a Falcon 9 launch work? The orbit is challenging. ASDS landing or expendable?
Could the 2nd stage be removed from Galileo orbit?  ???

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2022025
If transport for the satellites can be arranged. There are at least 2 spare sets of Falcon Heavies available for whatever challenging orbit is required. If the Falcon 9 lacks sufficient performance.  ;)

OHB suggested the Falcon-9, which is why I asked.
The satellites can be flown from Kourou (2 are there) or from Belgium to Cape Canaveral, why should that be a problem?
A Falcon-9 Heavy can launch this for sure. 
This would allow the remaining 4 gen. 1 satellites for orbit “C” to be launched together.
But are available Falcon-9 Heavy really in stock?

https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1505879400641871872
« Last Edit: 07/03/2022 08:14 am by GWR64 »

Offline Zed_Noir

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5426
  • Canada
  • Liked: 1790
  • Likes Given: 1289
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #129 on: 07/03/2022 04:23 pm »
<snip>
OHB suggested the Falcon-9, which is why I asked.
The satellites can be flown from Kourou (2 are there) or from Belgium to Cape Canaveral, why should that be a problem?
A Falcon-9 Heavy can launch this for sure. 
This would allow the remaining 4 gen. 1 satellites for orbit “C” to be launched together.
But are available Falcon-9 Heavy really in stock?
.....
Satellite transport isn't an issue if the An-124 isn't required.

Think there is the Falcon Heavy set for the Psyche mission that just announced a delay and at least another set for a delay DoD mission in storage at the SpaceX Florida facilities. There were 5 Falcon Heavy mission scheduled for 2022 with a possibility of none of them launching in 2022.  :(

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #130 on: 07/03/2022 04:31 pm »
I belive, the Boeing-747 and the IL-76 have been used so far.

A problem with a 4 satellite launch could be the dispenser. that would probably have to be built first.
But even if the launch is only a year away, it would be a win.
The timeframe for the first launch of Ariane 6 is still unclear. Thereafter the launch cadence will be slowly increased.
And Galileo is not the only customer. It needs 5 A-62 launches for the remaining Generation-1 satellites!

off topic:I know the situation with Falcon Heavy, also with Viasat-3.  :(
« Last Edit: 07/03/2022 05:48 pm by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #131 on: 07/09/2022 05:45 am »
What? the new GSAT0223  :o

https://twitter.com/GalileoSats/status/1545090055131234316

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2022026

Together with the maintenance of GSAT0103, this means a reduction to 21 satellites for about 2 weeks.
And GSAT0224 is not yet operational.

 ???




Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #132 on: 07/23/2022 04:01 pm »
3 weeks planned maintenance on GSAT 0103.
This satellite often causes problems lately.
...
https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2022025

The maintenance has been extended by 2 weeks until August 6th.

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2022029

hm...  ???

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #133 on: 08/05/2022 08:06 pm »
GSAT0103 is back (E19)

Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2022032
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2022-08-05 12:15

NAGU TYPE: USABLE
NAGU NUMBER: 2022032
NAGU SUBJECT: USABLE AS FROM 2022-08-05
NAGU REFERENCED TO: 2022029
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2022-08-05 07:51
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0103
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 19
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0103 (ALL SIGNALS) IS USABLE SINCE/AS OF 2022-08-05 BEGINNING 07:51 UTC. PAYLOAD ON RAFS CLOCK. GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0103 (ALL SIGNALS) WAS UNAVAILABLE FROM 2022-07-02 BEGINNING 12:41 UTC.

GSAT0223 (E34) is also back for a few days, but not for long
Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2022030
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2022-08-02 14:45

NAGU TYPE: USABLE
NAGU NUMBER: 2022030
NAGU SUBJECT: USABLE AS FROM 2022-08-01
NAGU REFERENCED TO: 2022026
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2022-08-01 16:00
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0223
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 34
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0223 (ALL SIGNALS) IS USABLE SINCE/AS OF 2022-08-01 BEGINNING 16:00 UTC. PAYLOAD ON PHM CLOCK. GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0223 (ALL SIGNALS) WAS UNAVAILABLE FROM 2022-07-11 BEGINNING 04:51 UTC UNTIL 2022-07-30 ENDING 15:00 UTC, FROM 2022-07-30 BEGINNING 18:00 UTC UNTIL 2022-07-31 ENDING 19:00 UTC AND FROM 2022-08-01 BEGINNING 01:00 UTC UNTIL 2022-08-01 ENDING 16:00 UTC.
Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2022031
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2022-08-05 11:45

NAGU TYPE: PLN_OUTAGE
NAGU NUMBER: 2022031
NAGU SUBJECT: PLANNED OUTAGE FROM 2022-08-11 UNTIL 2022-08-29
NAGU REFERENCED TO: N/A
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2022-08-11 00:00
END DATE EVENT (UTC): 2022-08-29 17:00
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0223
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 34
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0223 (ALL SIGNALS) WILL BE UNAVAILABLE FROM 2022-08-11 BEGINNING 00:00 UTC. OUTAGE RECOVERY ESTIMATED ON 2022-08-29 17:00 UTC.

GSAT0224 (E10) the other new one seems healthy,
according to galmon.eu, my phone showed E10 in the late afternoon
this NAGU is currently active, a USABINIT is still pending

Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2022027
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2022-07-07 15:30

NAGU TYPE: GENERAL (NOTICE)
NAGU NUMBER: 2022027
NAGU SUBJECT: GSAT0224 CONTRIBUTION TO I/NAV MESSAGE TESTING ACTIVITIES
NAGU REFERENCED TO: 2021024
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2022-07-11 04:45
END DATE EVENT (UTC): 2022-08-29 17:00
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0224

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GSAT0224 WILL BE INVOLVED IN I/NAV MESSAGE TESTING ACTIVITIES AND, THEREFORE, DURING THIS TIME USERS WILL OBSERVE INTERMITTENT PERIODS OF UNHEALTHY/ HEALTHY SIS. IT IS REMINDED THAT GSAT0224 IS NOT YET PART OF THE OPERATIONAL CONSTELLATION UNTIL THE RELEVANT USABINIT NAGU IS ISSUED. USERS SHALL REFER TO SERVICE NOTICE #10.
« Last Edit: 08/05/2022 08:20 pm by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #134 on: 08/29/2022 08:09 pm »
GSAT0223 is back in service:

Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2022033
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2022-08-29 16:15

NAGU TYPE: USABLE
NAGU NUMBER: 2022033
NAGU SUBJECT: USABLE AS FROM 2022-08-29
NAGU REFERENCED TO: 2022031
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2022-08-29 13:51
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0223
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 34
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0223 (ALL SIGNALS) IS USABLE SINCE/AS OF 2022-08-29 BEGINNING 13:51 UTC. PAYLOAD ON PHM CLOCK. GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0223 (ALL SIGNALS) WAS UNAVAILABLE FROM 2022-08-11 BEGINNING 00:00 UTC.

And... tata! finally GSAT0224  :)
Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2022034
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2022-08-29 16:30

NAGU TYPE: USABINIT
NAGU NUMBER: 2022034
NAGU SUBJECT: USABLE AS FROM 2022-08-29
NAGU REFERENCED TO: 2021024
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2022-08-29 13:51
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0224
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 10
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0224 (ALL SIGNALS) IS USABLE SINCE/AS OF 2022-08-29 BEGINNING 13:51 UTC. GSAT0224 IS POSITIONED IN SLOT B15 OF THE CONSTELLATION. PAYLOAD ON PHM CLOCK.
« Last Edit: 08/29/2022 08:12 pm by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #135 on: 10/08/2022 09:43 am »
Problems with GSAT0210 (FOC-FM10) SVID E01.
...
https://www.gsc-europa.eu/sites/default/files/sites/all/files/Galileo-service-notice-07-v1.0.pdf

https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2021012

...
Unfortunately, GSAT 0210 has been out of service for 2 weeks.
https://www.gsc-europa.eu/notice-advisory-to-galileo-users-nagu-2022015
...

GSAT 0210 / E01 has been out of service again unplanned since the end of August. This is the 3rd time within a year.
The launch of GSAT0210 was on Mai 5 2016. It went into operation on December 1 2016, and remained so without interruption until September 5 2021.

Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2022035
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2022-09-01 16:30

NAGU TYPE: UNP_UNUFN
NAGU NUMBER: 2022035
NAGU SUBJECT: UNAVAILABLE FROM 2022-08-31 UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE
NAGU REFERENCED TO: N/A
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2022-08-31 19:42
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0210
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 01
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0210 (ALL SIGNALS) IS UNAVAILABLE SINCE 2022-08-31 BEGINNING 19:42 UTC UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.

postscript:
Quote
Galileo E01@1: 🚨 clock jump of 58.00 nanoseconds  (= 19.4 meters)
7:02 PM · Oct 7, 2022
·galmonmon
https://twitter.com/GNSS_Changes/status/1578430470672506881
 ???
« Last Edit: 10/09/2022 01:24 pm by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #136 on: 12/20/2022 05:40 pm »
good/bad news: GSAT 0210, E01 is back in operation. However, a rubidium atomic clock is now used.
That probably means both hydrogen masers are no longer usable. The rubidium atomic clocks are accurate enough in my opinion, no problem.
But GSAT 0210 was launched in May 2016, so before it was discovered in early 2017 that faulty rubidium atomic clocks were installed in (some/all?) FOC satellites, which can fail quickly.
 :-\


Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2022054
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2022-12-19 17:00

NAGU TYPE: USABLE
NAGU NUMBER: 2022054
NAGU SUBJECT: USABLE AS FROM 2022-12-19
NAGU REFERENCED TO: 2022035
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2022-12-19 15:36
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0210
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 01
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0210 (ALL SIGNALS) IS USABLE SINCE/AS OF 2022-12-19 BEGINNING 15:36 UTC. PAYLOAD ON RAFS CLOCK. GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0210 (ALL SIGNALS) WAS UNAVAILABLE FROM 2022-08-31 BEGINNING 19:42 UTC.
« Last Edit: 12/20/2022 07:00 pm by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #137 on: 02/22/2023 07:02 pm »
hm, GSAT0220 anomaly

Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2023010
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2023-02-20 20:05

NAGU TYPE: UNP_UNUFN
NAGU NUMBER: 2023010
NAGU SUBJECT: UNAVAILABLE FROM 2023-02-20 UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE
NAGU REFERENCED TO: N/A
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2023-02-20 18:54
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0220
SPACE VEHICLE ID: SV13
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0220 (ALL SIGNALS) IS UNAVAILABLE SINCE 2023-02-20 BEGINNING 18:54 UTC UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.

https://twitter.com/EU4Space/status/1628055132393902081
Quote
19Feb @ 21:54UTC Galileo satellite GSAT0220 experienced an anomaly on the broadcast of its signal in the E1 frequency band.
In line w/ the standard procedures, the broadcast from this🛰️was interrupted by the operator &will remain so for the duration of the anomaly investigations.

https://twitter.com/EU4Space/status/1628055135782928384

Quote
Further info will be communicated once the source of the anomaly and the course to signal recovery have been determined.

The Galileo constellation minimum service performance has not been affected.
For more information:
https://www.gsc-europa.eu/sites/default/files/sites/all/files/Galileo-service-notice-14-v1.0.pdf
« Last Edit: 02/22/2023 07:03 pm by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #138 on: 03/12/2023 12:21 pm »
GSAT0220 is back in operation:
Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2023014
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2023-03-11 08:15

NAGU TYPE: USABLE
NAGU NUMBER: 2023014
NAGU SUBJECT: USABLE AS FROM 2023-03-11
NAGU REFERENCED TO: 2023010
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2023-03-11 06:36
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0220
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 13
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0220 (ALL SIGNALS) IS USABLE SINCE/AS OF 2023-03-11 BEGINNING 06:36 UTC. PAYLOAD ON PHM CLOCK. GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0220 (ALL SIGNALS) WAS UNAVAILABLE FROM 2023-02-20 BEGINNING 18:54 UTC.

...
🇪🇺 EUSPA - EU Agency for the Space Programme
@EU4Space
·
21. Feb.
Antwort an
@EU4Space
Further info will be communicated once the source of the anomaly and the course to signal recovery have been determined.
...

nothing found  ???

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #139 on: 03/24/2023 05:26 pm »
good/bad news: GSAT 0210, E01 is back in operation. However, a rubidium atomic clock is now used.
That probably means both hydrogen masers are no longer usable. The rubidium atomic clocks are accurate enough in my opinion, no problem.
But GSAT 0210 was launched in May 2016, so before it was discovered in early 2017 that faulty rubidium atomic clocks were installed in (some/all?) FOC satellites, which can fail quickly.
 :-\

Oh oh   :(

Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2023019
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2023-03-23 20:00

NAGU TYPE: UNP_UNUFN
NAGU NUMBER: 2023019
NAGU SUBJECT: UNAVAILABLE FROM 2023-03-23 UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE
NAGU REFERENCED TO: N/A
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2023-03-23 17:37
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0210
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 01
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0210 (ALL SIGNALS) IS UNAVAILABLE SINCE 2023-03-23 BEGINNING 17:37 UTC UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.

https://twitter.com/GNSS_Changes/status/1638794650374004739
Quote
Galileo E01@1: 🚨 clock jump of 41.70 nanoseconds  (= 13.9 meters)
one of several

Offline eeergo

-DaviD-

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #141 on: 03/28/2023 06:28 pm »
Oh oh   :(
[...]
one of several

Testing testing...

https://mobile.twitter.com/GalileoSats/status/1640282783770636289

GSAT0210/E01 is still unusable and was unusable before this test.
The clock jumps on GSAT0210 have nothing to do with this test, I think.
« Last Edit: 03/28/2023 08:01 pm by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #142 on: 04/02/2023 09:31 am »
Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2023023
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2023-03-29 17:50

NAGU TYPE: USABLE
NAGU NUMBER: 2023023
NAGU SUBJECT: USABLE AS FROM 2023-03-29
NAGU REFERENCED TO: 2023019
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2023-03-29 16:18
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0210
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 01
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0210 (ALL SIGNALS) IS USABLE SINCE/AS OF 2023-03-29 BEGINNING 16:18 UTC. PAYLOAD ON RAFS CLOCK. GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0210 (ALL SIGNALS) WAS UNAVAILABLE FROM 2023-03-23 BEGINNING 17:37 UTC.

GSAT 0210 is usable again. As before the last break, with a rubidium atomic clock (RAFS).
It is not clear whether both rubidium clocks are still working.
It will probably be 2 years or more before a replacement will be usable. Long time.
« Last Edit: 04/02/2023 12:11 pm by GWR64 »

Offline jpo234

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2019
  • Liked: 2277
  • Likes Given: 2168
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #143 on: 04/18/2023 12:30 pm »
Politico article about Galileo launches on Falcon 9 and/or Vulcan: EU turns to Elon Musk to replace stalled French rocket
Quote
The Commission reckons only SpaceX's Falcon 9 heavy launcher and United Launch Alliance's Vulcan system are up to the job of sending the EU's new geo-navigation Galileo satellites — which weigh around 700 kilograms each — into orbit.
You want to be inspired by things. You want to wake up in the morning and think the future is going to be great. That's what being a spacefaring civilization is all about. It's about believing in the future and believing the future will be better than the past. And I can't think of anything more exciting than being out there among the stars.

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #144 on: 04/30/2023 10:22 am »
Damned! GSAT0210 off again

Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2023032
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2023-04-30 08:30

NAGU TYPE: UNP_UNUFN
NAGU NUMBER: 2023032
NAGU SUBJECT: UNAVAILABLE FROM 2023-04-30 UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE
NAGU REFERENCED TO: N/A
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2023-04-30 00:52
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0210
SPACE VEHICLE ID: 01
SIGNAL(S) AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0210 (ALL SIGNALS) IS UNAVAILABLE SINCE 2023-04-30 BEGINNING 00:52 UTC UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.
https://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-service-status/constellation-information

Politico article about Galileo launches on Falcon 9 and/or Vulcan: EU turns to Elon Musk to replace stalled French rocket
Quote
The Commission reckons only SpaceX's Falcon 9 heavy launcher and United Launch Alliance's Vulcan system are up to the job of sending the EU's new geo-navigation Galileo satellites — which weigh around 700 kilograms each — into orbit.

After the Ariane 6 status update in October 2022 and the statement from Arianespace CEO Stéphane Israël
(in connection with the delay): "... no issue..." the EU should have reacted.
Even if it was about the lack of overlap between Ariane 5 and 6, it also concerns the replacement for the Soyuz.
« Last Edit: 04/30/2023 10:32 am by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #145 on: 05/18/2023 08:25 am »
Politico article about Galileo launches on Falcon 9 and/or Vulcan: EU turns to Elon Musk to replace stalled French rocket
Quote
The Commission reckons only SpaceX's Falcon 9 heavy launcher and United Launch Alliance's Vulcan system are up to the job of sending the EU's new geo-navigation Galileo satellites — which weigh around 700 kilograms each — into orbit.

Checked this on the Nasa Launch Vehicle Performance website. However, I do not know exactly which C3 energy the
Galileo orbit corresponds. So I can only guess.
The Falcon Heavy (Recovery) and the Vulcan VC2 come into question for Galileo launches.
Both could probably lift 4 Galileo-satellites + dispenser (~3300 kg) into the intended orbit. In terms of performance, they are close to each other.
For Falcon-9 ASDS or expendable, I can't find data in this range.
Surprising to me, an Atlas V 401 could possibly have launched 2 satellites + dispenser, while a Vulcan VC0 certainly cannot.
Other alternatives: H-2A or H-3 obviously are not available.
The Ariane-5 ES was discontinued too early.
« Last Edit: 05/18/2023 09:27 am by GWR64 »

Online LouScheffer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3369
  • Liked: 6068
  • Likes Given: 828
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #146 on: 05/20/2023 10:53 pm »
Politico article about Galileo launches on Falcon 9 and/or Vulcan: EU turns to Elon Musk to replace stalled French rocket
Quote
The Commission reckons only SpaceX's Falcon 9 heavy launcher and United Launch Alliance's Vulcan system are up to the job of sending the EU's new geo-navigation Galileo satellites — which weigh around 700 kilograms each — into orbit.
Checked this on the Nasa Launch Vehicle Performance website. However, I do not know exactly which C3 energy the
Galileo orbit corresponds. So I can only guess.
The Falcon Heavy (Recovery) and the Vulcan VC2 come into question for Galileo launches.
Both could probably lift 4 Galileo-satellites + dispenser (~3300 kg) into the intended orbit. In terms of performance, they are close to each other.
For Falcon-9 ASDS or expendable, I can't find data in this range.
Wikipedia lists the orbit as circular at 23222 km altitude.  To reach this apogee from LEO, you need to add about 2185 m/s.  When you arive at the top, you are going 2212 m/s, and need to speed up to 3670 m/s, so need to add 1458 m/s.   So from LEO, you need to add about 2185+1458 m/s, or about 3643 m/s total.  This same total, all applied at LEO, would lead to escape at about C3 = 9 km^2/sec^2.

According the the NASA web site, the F9 can lift 2325 kg to this orbit.  (2-3 satellites).  They don't give a figure for fully expendable, but guesses make it look like about 3700 kg, so 4 satellites.  VC2 can lift 4865 kg (6 satellites) and FH recovery can lift  5275 kg (6-7 satellites).

EDIT:  This is not correct for Galileo orbits at 56 degrees.  For a generic C3=9 mission the inclination does not matter, as long as abs(DLA) <= launch latitude (which is true for almost all escape missions, when launching from USA sites).    But for a 56 degree, non-escape mission, it does matter.  Here's a guess how much:

To reach an orbit with an inclination of 56 degrees from the cape, you need to launch at 58.5 degrees from the equator (or a launch azimuth of 31.5 degrees).  At this azimuth, instead of the 408 m/s boost from earth rotation, you only get 408*cos(58.5) = 213 m/s, or 194 m/s less.  This 194 m/s must be made up elsewhere, so the total dv to 3837 m/s, which when applied from LEO corresponds to a C3 = 13.6.  This gives 4360 kg for VC-2, and 4650 for FH with recovery.

However, these will still be optimistic if launching from the Cape.  The cape allows azimuths from 35-120 degrees, but this orbit wants 31.5.  So a dogleg will be needed as well, further limiting performance.  These were also needed on the GPS mission with similar orbits.  I don't have a good estimate of how much performance this costs.

« Last Edit: 05/21/2023 05:58 pm by LouScheffer »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #147 on: 05/21/2023 03:36 am »
Politico article about Galileo launches on Falcon 9 and/or Vulcan: EU turns to Elon Musk to replace stalled French rocket
Quote
The Commission reckons only SpaceX's Falcon 9 heavy launcher and United Launch Alliance's Vulcan system are up to the job of sending the EU's new geo-navigation Galileo satellites — which weigh around 700 kilograms each — into orbit.
Checked this on the Nasa Launch Vehicle Performance website. However, I do not know exactly which C3 energy the
Galileo orbit corresponds. So I can only guess.
The Falcon Heavy (Recovery) and the Vulcan VC2 come into question for Galileo launches.
Both could probably lift 4 Galileo-satellites + dispenser (~3300 kg) into the intended orbit. In terms of performance, they are close to each other.
For Falcon-9 ASDS or expendable, I can't find data in this range.
Wikipedia lists the orbit as circular at 23222 km altitude.  To reach this apogee from LEO, you need to add about 2185 m/s.  When you arive at the top, you are going 2212 m/s, and need to speed up to 3670 m/s, so need to add 1458 m/s.   So from LEO, you need to add about 2185+1458 m/s, or about 3643 m/s total.  This same total, all applied at LEO, would lead to escape at about C3 = 9 km^2/sec^2.

According the the NASA web site, the F9 can lift 2325 kg to this orbit.  (2-3 satellites).  They don't give a figure for fully expendable, but guesses make it look like about 3700 kg, so 4 satellites.  VC2 can lift 4865 kg (6 satellites) and FH recovery can lift  5275 kg (6-7 satellites).

The ULA states 3900 kg for VC2 for MEO (Medium Earth Orbit) = 20,368 km circular at 55 deg (GPS)
So I assumed the C3 value is higher.
https://www.ulalaunch.com/rockets/vulcan-centaur

Online LouScheffer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3369
  • Liked: 6068
  • Likes Given: 828
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #148 on: 05/21/2023 05:39 pm »
The ULA states 3900 kg for VC2 for MEO (Medium Earth Orbit) = 20,368 km circular at 55 deg (GPS)
So I assumed the C3 value is higher.
https://www.ulalaunch.com/rockets/vulcan-centaur
Oops - the calculation I did was to raise from an LEO orbit to a Galileo orbit of the same inclination.  For a generic C3=9 mission the inclination does not matter, as long as abs(DLA) <= launch latitude (which is true for almost all escape missions, when launching from USA sites).    But for a 56 degree, non-escape mission, it does matter.  That means my estimates above will be optimistic.  I'm adjusting them.

EDIT: revised estimate is C3 = 13.6 (see above).  But this is still somewhat optimistic if launched from the Cape, as a dogleg trajectory will be needed to hit this inclination.
« Last Edit: 05/21/2023 05:56 pm by LouScheffer »

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1672
  • Likes Given: 1034
Re: Galileo Deployment
« Reply #149 on: 06/09/2023 10:16 am »
GSAT0210 has been out of service for over a month now, I'm afraid that's it.
After GSAT0204, that would be the second FOC satellite that obviously no longer has an exact atomic clock.
This is where the hardware error in the rubidium clocks on the FOC satellites GSAT0201 to GSAT0214 (worst case) takes revenge.
The IOV satellites had problems early on with the hydrogen maser, but 3 of them still work with rubidium atomic clocks. The failure of GSAT0104 had another reason.
So one satellite each is missing in plane A and C.
The progress on Ariane 6 is very slow. If the first launch takes place in H1 2024,
there are probably max 1-2 more launches in 2024. So at most one for Galileo.
A Falcon 9 ASDS launch with 2 satellites is tight. Expendable it works, I think.
Whether a launch with 4 satellites is desired, I don't know. Maybe in plane C. More than 4 makes no sense.
The two options are above.
Many thanks to @LouScheffer for the excellent analysis.

Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Margaritaville Beach Resort South Padre Island
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
0