Author Topic: LIVE: SpaceX Falcon 9 - CRS-9 Dragon - July 18, 2016 - UPDATES  (Read 151230 times)

Offline Chris Bergin

« Last Edit: 07/18/2016 04:32 am by Chris Bergin »
Support NSF via L2 -- Help improve NSF -- Site Rules/Feedback/Updates
**Not a L2 member? Whitelist this forum in your adblocker to support the site and ensure full functionality.**

Offline Chris Bergin

The first stage was pictured at McGregor a few days ago (L2 McGregor).

The CRS-9 Dragon ahead of shipping:
Support NSF via L2 -- Help improve NSF -- Site Rules/Feedback/Updates
**Not a L2 member? Whitelist this forum in your adblocker to support the site and ensure full functionality.**

Offline Chris Bergin

NASA's launch date presser for the July 18 target:

June 21, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-073
Next SpaceX Commercial Cargo Launch Now No Earlier Than July 18, US Media Accreditation Remains Open

The next SpaceX commercial cargo resupply services mission for NASA to the International Space Station now is targeted for launch no earlier than 12:45 a.m. EDT Monday, July 18.

An uncrewed SpaceX Dragon spacecraft, carrying crew supplies and station hardware, will lift off on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), adjacent to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

This is the ninth mission by SpaceX under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services contract. Among the almost 4,900 pounds of supplies, equipment and science research Dragon will carry is the first of two international docking adapters, which will allow Boeing's CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft to dock to the station when transporting astronauts in the near future as part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program.
Support NSF via L2 -- Help improve NSF -- Site Rules/Feedback/Updates
**Not a L2 member? Whitelist this forum in your adblocker to support the site and ensure full functionality.**

Offline tleski

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 477
  • Washington, DC
  • Liked: 367
  • Likes Given: 753
The booster that is most likely the CRS-9 first stage was spotted yesterday on its way to the Cape.

The photo was posted by Michael Seeley in the SpaceX Facebook group:
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10208247796804889&set=gm.10154329865226318&type=3&theater

Online catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10791
  • Enthusiast since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 8163
  • Likes Given: 7442
July 07, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-080

NASA to Discuss Sequencing DNA in Space, Highlight Research Headed to Space Station on Next SpaceX Cargo Launch
 
NASA is sending a Phase Change Heat Exchanger to the International Space Station to test thermal control capabilities aboard the orbiting laboratory. The device will store excess thermal energy during simulated high heat loads by melting a material. The energy is later rejected by the experiment, freezing the material and preparing for the next heat load cycle. This technology demonstration will improve our understanding of temperature regulation in spacecraft for deep space exploration.

Credits: NASA

NASA will host a media teleconference at 2 p.m. EDT Wednesday, July 13, to discuss the groundbreaking research and cargo aboard the next SpaceX commercial resupply flight to the International Space Station.

Researchers will highlight space-based experiments to test the capabilities for sequencing DNA, understand bone loss, track heart changes in microgravity and regulate temperature aboard spacecraft. Participants also will discuss the first international docking adapter headed to station, which will allow commercial spacecraft to dock to the station when transporting astronauts in the near future as part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program.

The briefing will take place onsite at the ISS Research and Development Conference in San Diego. Registered media may attend in person. To participate in the teleconference, reporters must contact Cheryl Warner at 202-358-1100 or [email protected] by 1 p.m. EDT July 13 for dial-in information.

The briefing participants include:

Camille Alleyne, associate International Space Station Program scientist at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, will provide an overview of the more than 250 science investigations that will take place during Expeditions 48 and 49.
Michael Roberts, deputy chief scientist, Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), which manages the U.S. National Laboratory aboard the space station, will discuss how these investigations aim to provide a better understanding of living and working in space while also improving life on Earth.
Sarah Wallace, microbiologist at Johnson, will discuss the first experiment to test sequencing DNA in space. A space-based DNA sequencer could identify microbes, diagnose diseases, increase our understanding of crew member health, and potentially help detect DNA-based life elsewhere in the solar system.
Lanetra Tate, program executive for NASA’s Game Changing Development Program, will highlight how a phase-change material heat exchanger device could help maintain critical temperatures inside a spacecraft by freezing or thawing a material.
Bruce Hammer, professor at the University of Minnesota’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research in Minneapolis, will discuss an experiment with the U.S. National Lab and National Institutes of Health to test the accuracy of a device used to simulate microgravity, which will lead to a better understanding of gravity’s effect on bone cell function.
Arun Sharma, graduate student, Stanford Cardiovascular Institute in Stanford, California, will discuss an experiment with the U.S. National Lab on how microgravity changes the human heart. Results could advance the study of heart disease and development of drugs and cell replacement therapy for future space missions.
NASA and Boeing representatives will discuss the first of two identical international docking adapters (IDA) that will be installed on the space station. The IDA’s first users are expected to be Boeing's CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft now in development in partnership with NASA, which will return crewed launches to and from low-Earth orbit, including the space station, from the United States on American-led systems.
The SpaceX Dragon capsule is targeted to launch at 12:45 a.m. Monday, July 18, on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The spacecraft will carry crew supplies, scientific research and hardware to the orbital laboratory to support the Expedition 48 and 49 crew members.

This launch is the ninth contracted mission by SpaceX under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services contract.

Audio of the teleconference will stream live online at:

http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio

For launch countdown coverage, NASA's launch blog, and more information about the mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/spacex

-end-
Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

Offline Chris Bergin

Static Fire expected to take place on Saturday morning.
« Last Edit: 07/12/2016 03:59 pm by Chris Bergin »
Support NSF via L2 -- Help improve NSF -- Site Rules/Feedback/Updates
**Not a L2 member? Whitelist this forum in your adblocker to support the site and ensure full functionality.**

Offline ChrisC

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2201
  • Liked: 1521
  • Likes Given: 1711
"6 more days to launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL, July 18; window opens 12:42 am ET! @usairforce"

https://twitter.com/45thSpaceWing/status/752894064081702913
PSA #1: EST does NOT mean "Eastern Time".  Use "Eastern" or "ET" instead, all year round, and avoid this common error.  Google "EST vs EDT".
PSA #2: It's and its: know the difference and quietly impress grammar pedants.  Google "angry flower its" .  *** See profile for two more NSF forum tips. ***

Online Comga

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6452
  • Liked: 4558
  • Likes Given: 5065
July 12, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-084
NASA to Televise Prelaunch Briefing, Launch of Next Commercial Resupply Mission to International Space Station
 
DNA testing aboard the International Space Station typically requires collecting samples and sending them back to Earth to be analyzed. NASA’s Biomolecule Sequencer investigation will test a new device that will allow DNA sequencing in space for the first time. The miniature device is one of the research experiments headed to the space station on the next SpaceX commercial cargo resupply mission, targeted to launch Monday, July 18, 2016 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

NASA provider SpaceX is scheduled to deliver scientific research, crew supplies and hardware on its ninth Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station Monday, July 18. Coverage of this mission will begin with a prelaunch news briefing at 2 p.m. EDT Saturday, July 16, on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

The SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft is scheduled for liftoff on the company's Falcon 9 rocket at 12:45 a.m. Monday from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Coverage of the launch begins at 11:30 p.m. Sunday, July 17.

Approximately 10 minutes after launch, Dragon will reach its preliminary orbit, deploy its solar arrays and begin its two-day voyage of carefully choreographed thruster firings to reach the space station. After arrival, NASA astronaut Jeff Williams will use the station’s 57.7-foot (17.6-meter) robotic arm to reach out and capture the Dragon spacecraft. NASA astronaut Kate Rubins will serve as his backup, and ground controllers will send commands for the station’s robotic arm to install Dragon on the Earth-facing side of the Harmony module.

Live coverage of the rendezvous and capture will begin at 5:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 20, with installation coverage at 9:45 a.m.

The following day, the Expedition 48 crew will pressurize the vestibule between the station and Dragon, open the hatch between the two spacecraft, and begin the five-week process of unloading the almost 4,900 pounds of supplies and reloading the spacecraft with cargo scheduled to return to Earth Aug. 29.

Among the arriving cargo is the first of two international docking adapters, which will provide a means for commercial spacecraft to dock to the station when transporting astronauts in the near future as part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program.

Experiments launching to station include a space-based DNA sequencer, which the station crew will test. This sequencer has the potential to identify microbes, diagnose diseases and evaluate crew member health, and even help detect DNA-based life elsewhere in the solar system. Other experiments seek to expand our understanding of bone cell function, track heart changes that occur in microgravity, and regulate internal spacecraft temperatures.

If the launch does not occur Monday the next launch opportunity is 12 a.m. Wednesday, July 20, with NASA TV coverage starting at 10:45 p.m. Tuesday, July 19.

For an updated schedule of prelaunch briefings, events and NASA TV coverage, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/content/spacex-crs-9-briefings-and-events
For NASA TV downlink information, schedules and links to streaming video, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv
Learn more about the SpaceX mission to the International Space Station at:
http://www.nasa.gov/spacex
« Last Edit: 07/12/2016 11:28 pm by Comga »
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21698
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 8542
  • Likes Given: 318
July 12, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M11-16

SpaceX CRS-9 Briefings and Events


NASA provider SpaceX is scheduled to launch its ninth Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station Monday, July 18. NASA Television coverage of the launch begins at 11:30 p.m. EDT, Sunday, July 17.

The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft is targeting liftoff on the company's Falcon 9 rocket at 12:45 a.m. from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida, carrying science research, crew supplies and hardware to the orbiting laboratory in support of the Expedition 48 and 49 crew members.

As part of prelaunch activities, NASA TV will air a prelaunch briefing conducted by mission managers on Saturday, July 16, at 2 p.m. The briefing also will stream live on the agency’s website at www.nasa.gov/ntv.

About 10 minutes after launch, Dragon will reach its preliminary orbit, deploy its solar arrays and begin a carefully choreographed series of thruster firings to reach the space station. SpaceX also is planning to attempt to land its Falcon 9 first stage on land.

After a two-day trip, NASA astronaut Jeff Williams will use the station’s 57.7-foot (17.6-meter) robotic arm to reach out and capture the Dragon spacecraft as he operates from the station’s cupola. NASA astronaut Kate Rubins will serve as the backup. Ground commands will be sent from Houston for the station’s arm to install Dragon on the Earth-facing side of the station’s Harmony module for its stay at the space station. By the next day, the crew will pressurize the vestibule between the station and Dragon, and then open the hatch that leads to the forward bulkhead of Dragon.

Live coverage of the rendezvous and capture July 20 will begin at 5:30 a.m. on NASA TV, with installation set to begin at 9:45 a.m.

During the next five weeks, crew members will unload the spacecraft and reload it with cargo to return to Earth. About five-and-a-half hours after it departs the station Aug. 29, it will splash down in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Baja California.

In addition to SpaceX’s arrival, Roscosmos is scheduled to launch its next cargo resupply mission on the ISS Progress 64 cargo resupply mission at 5:41 p.m. EDT, Saturday, July 16, with a docking Monday night. NASA Television of launch coverage will begin at 5:30 p.m.

Media at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida will have the opportunity to participate in special tours and briefings July 16 and 17, as well as view the launch. The deadline for media to apply for accreditation for this launch has passed. For more information about media accreditation, contact Jennifer Horner at 321-867-6598 or [email protected].

If the launch does not occur Monday, July 18, the next launch opportunity is midnight Wednesday, July 20, with NASA TV coverage starting at 10:45 p.m. Tuesday, July 19.


PRESS ACCREDITATION OFFICE HOURS OF OPERATION

Media badges will be issued at the Press Accreditation Office located on State Road 3, Merritt Island. Badging hours of operation are:

Saturday, July 16: 7 a.m. – 9 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. – 2 p.m.
 Sunday, July 17: 1:30 p.m. – 3 p.m., 5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., 10 p.m. – 11:45 p.m.

PRESS SITE HOURS OF OPERATION

The NASA Press Site at Kennedy will be open as follows:

Saturday, July 16:  7 a.m. – 4 p.m.
 Sunday, July 17: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 a.m. Monday, July 18

PRELAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE ON NASA TV

Saturday, July 16 (L-2 day): A prelaunch status briefing will be held at Kennedy’s Press Site TV Auditorium at 2 p.m. and airs live on NASA Television and the agency’s website at www.nasa.gov/ntv.

Participants will be:
•Dan Hartman, deputy ISS Program manager, NASA’s Johnson Space Center
•Julie Robinson, chief ISS Program scientist, NASA’s Johnson Space Center
•Hans Koenigsmann, vice president of Flight Reliability, SpaceX
•Mike McAleenan, weather officer, 45th Weather Squadron


“WHAT’S ON BOARD” SCIENCE BRIEFING ON NASA TV

Sunday, July 17 (L-1 day): A science, research and technology briefing will be held at Kennedy’s Press Site TV Auditorium at 3 p.m. and airs live on NASA Television and the agency’s website. This briefing is geared toward NASA Social participants with limited seating for media.

Participants will be:
•Julie Robinson, chief ISS Program scientist, NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, will provide an overview of the more than 250 science investigations that will take place during Expeditions 48 and 49.
•Michael Roberts, deputy chief scientist, Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), which manages the U.S. National Laboratory aboard the space station, will discuss how these investigations aim to provide a better understanding of living and working in space while also improving life on Earth.
•Sarah Wallace, microbiologist at Johnson, will discuss the first experiment to test sequencing DNA in space. A space-based DNA sequencer could identify microbes, diagnose diseases, increase our understanding of crew member health, and potentially help detect DNA-based life elsewhere in the solar system.
•Lanetra Tate, program executive for NASA’s Game Changing Development Program, will highlight how a phase-change material heat exchanger device could help maintain critical temperatures inside a spacecraft by freezing or thawing a material.
•Bruce Hammer, professor at the University of Minnesota’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research in Minneapolis, will discuss an experiment with the U.S. National Lab and National Institutes of Health to test the accuracy of a device used to simulate microgravity, which will lead to a better understanding of gravity’s effect on bone cell function.
•Arun Sharma, graduate student, Stanford Cardiovascular Institute in Stanford, California, will discuss an experiment with the U.S. National Lab on how microgravity changes the human heart. Results could advance the study of heart disease and development of drugs and cell replacement therapy for future space missions.
•Sean Kelly, senior project manager for the relocation and International Docking Adapter, Johnson Space Center; and David Clemen, ISS development and modification projects, Boeing, will discuss the first of two international docking adapters that will be installed on the space station.


POST-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE ON NASA TV

Monday, July 18: A post-launch news conference will occur at about 2 a.m. in Kennedy’s Press Site TV Auditorium and air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Participants will be:
•Dan Hartman, deputy International Space Station Program manager, NASA’s Johnson Space Center
•Hans Koenigsmann, vice president of Flight Reliability, SpaceX


NEWS MEDIA TOURS 

News and social media participants will receive tours of various facilities and attend briefings about upcoming NASA and commercial partner activities.

Journey to Mars/Commercial Crew Program Update Event

Saturday, July 16 (L-2 Day): News media will depart the Press Site by bus at 8:30 a.m. Media will receive an update from NASA on the Launch Pad 39B modifications in preparation for NASA’s journey to Mars. At 10 a.m., media will depart for Kennedy’s Space Station Processing Facility, where they will hear about the international docking adapters that future visiting vehicles, including those in development with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, will use when docking to the station. Considered the most important addition to the ISS since completion in 2011, the adapter is essential to docking with SpaceX’s Crew Dragon and Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft in the near future.

Remote Camera Set Up/Pad Photo Opportunity - Space Launch Complex 40 or Universal Camera Site 3

Sunday, July 17 (L-1 Day): News media will be able to establish sound-activated remote cameras to capture the liftoff from the pad at Space Launch Complex 40. Foreign national media will be able to establish remote cameras at the nearby Universal Camera Site 3. Buses depart the Press Site at 7 p.m. After all cameras are deployed, media will depart for the Press Site at 8:30 p.m. with an expected arrival time of 9 p.m.

Launch Viewing

Sunday, July 17 (L-1 Day): News media wanting to view the launch from the NASA Causeway will depart the Press Site by bus at 11:15 p.m.

A sign-up sheet will be available in the newsroom for media desiring to photograph the launch from the roof of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). Space is limited for this activity so media must sign up in person. At 11:15 p.m. Sunday, July 17, media selected will depart the Press Site for the VAB.

NASA SOCIAL

Up to 50 social media representatives were invited to cover launch. The Kennedy Press Site Annex will serve as their home base, and they will view launch from the NASA Causeway. Social media will attend some of the same activities as the traditional news media and will receive tours of various facilities and briefings about upcoming NASA and commercial partner activities.

NASA TV LAUNCH COVERAGE

Sunday, July 17 (L-1 Day): NASA TV live coverage will begin at 11:30 p.m. For NASA TV downlink information, schedules and links to streaming video, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

Audio only of the news conferences and launch coverage will be carried on the NASA “V” circuits, which may be accessed by dialing 321-867-1220, -1240, -1260 or -7135. On launch day, "mission audio," the launch conductor’s countdown activities without NASA TV launch commentary, will be carried on 321-867-7135 starting at 11 p.m. Launch also will be available on local amateur VHF radio frequency 146.940 MHz heard within Brevard County on the Space Coast.

IN-FLIGHT NASA TV COVERAGE

If launch occurs July 18, NASA TV will provide live coverage of the arrival of the SpaceX CRS-9 Dragon spacecraft to the space station July 20. NASA TV will cover the rendezvous and capture of the spacecraft beginning at 5:30 a.m. with installation taking place at approximately 10 a.m. NASA TV coverage of the installation of Dragon will begin at 9:30 a.m.

NASA WEB PRELAUNCH AND LAUNCH COVERAGE

Prelaunch and launch day coverage of the SpaceX CRS-9 flight will be available on the NASA website. Coverage will include live streaming and blog updates beginning at 11:30 p.m. as the countdown milestones occur. On-demand streaming video, podcast and photos of the launch will be available shortly after liftoff. For questions about countdown coverage, contact the newsroom at 321-867-2468. You can follow countdown coverage on our launch blog at:

http://blogs.nasa.gov/spacex

Learn more about the SpaceX CRS-9 mission by going to the mission home page at:

http://www.nasa.gov/spacex

TWITTER

The Kennedy Twitter feed will be updated throughout the launch countdown. To access the feed, visit:

http://www.twitter.com/NASAKennedy

FACEBOOK

The Kennedy Facebook feed will be updated throughout the launch countdown. To access the feed, visit:

http://www.facebook.com/NASAKennedy

RECORDED STATUS

Recorded status reports on the launch of SpaceX CRS-9 spacecraft and associated prelaunch activities will be provided on the Kennedy media phone line starting Friday, July 15. The telephone number is 321-867-2525.

WIRELESS CAPABILITY

Wireless capability for the news media is available at the Kennedy Press Site.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

For video b-roll and other International Space Station media resources, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/stationnews

For more information about the International Space Station, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station
Jacques :-)

Offline Raul

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 352
  • Ústí nad Orlicí, CZECH
  • Liked: 1188
  • Likes Given: 99
LOCAL NOTICE TO MARINERS
http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/pdf/lnms/lnm07282016.pdf
Quote
ATLANTIC OCEAN - FLORIDA - CAPE CANAVERAL: EASTERN RANGE OP # X4569 FALCON-9 CRS-9
Eastern Range will be conducting hazardous operations surface to unlimited within the following Launch Hazard Areas.
A: From 2840N 8039W
TO 2856N 8023W
TO 2902N 8004W
TO 3023N 7842W
TO 3044N 7836W
TO 3121N 7809W
TO 3156N 7707W
TO 3144N 7647W
TO 3046N 7725W
TO 3015N 7837W
TO 2835N 8024W
TO 2826N 8026W
TO 2822N 8041W to beginning
B: From 3034N 7845W
TO 3116N 7814W
TO 3155N 7700W
TO 3147N 7652W
TO 3047N 7727W
TO 3016N 7831W to beginning
Hazard periods for primary and backup launch day;
Primary: 18 / 0437Z thru 18 / 0519Z Jul 16. T-0 is 0442Z
Backup: 20 / 0352Z thru 20 / 0434Z Jul 16. T-0 is 0357Z


CRS-9 Launch Hazard Areas Visualization
https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1H3pbysdIKjJE7htHeqgV0FqohUA

Offline Raul

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 352
  • Ústí nad Orlicí, CZECH
  • Liked: 1188
  • Likes Given: 99
SpaceX CRS-9 mission overview from NASA.
http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/spacex_crs-9_mission_overview.pdf
Quote
TOTAL PRESSURIZED CARGO WITH PACKAGING: 3946.3 lbs. / 1790 kg
International Docking Adapter (IDA) 1029.5 lbs. / 467 kg

Offline Norm38

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1696
  • Liked: 1272
  • Likes Given: 2316
As of right now the weather forecast for Sunday night is clear skies, 20% chance of rain.

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21698
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 8542
  • Likes Given: 318
IDA-2 Loading into Dragon.

SpaceX provided these photos of engineers and technicians loading the International Docking Adapter into the trunk of the Dragon spacecraft for launch to the International Space Station. Known as IDA-2, the docking ring is tailored to the international docking standard for future human-rated spacecraft and is outfitted with sensors and instruments designed to accommodate new spacecraft carrying astronauts to the orbiting laboratory. There is a lot more to the IDA story and you can read about it here:

http://go.nasa.gov/2a9xpTN
« Last Edit: 07/14/2016 07:12 pm by jacqmans »
Jacques :-)

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21698
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 8542
  • Likes Given: 318
Jacques :-)

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21698
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 8542
  • Likes Given: 318
Jacques :-)

Offline Raul

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 352
  • Ústí nad Orlicí, CZECH
  • Liked: 1188
  • Likes Given: 99
CRS-9 Second Stage Debris Area
Quote
HYDROPAC 2112/2016 (GEN) 

SOUTHEASTERN INDIAN OCEAN.
WESTERN SOUTH PACIFIC.
SPACE DEBRIS.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS 180528Z TO 180558Z JUL,
   ALTERNATE 200443Z TO 200513Z JUL
   IN AREA BOUND BY
   18-43S 077-50E, 26-32S 083-07E,
   34-10S 091-57E, 40-35S 101-16E,
   46-45S 113-11E, 52-02S 132-11E,
   53-03S 147-21E, 52-39S 156-13E,
   51-59S 156-00E, 49-31S 132-11E,
   41-42S 110-02E, 31-15S 093-51E,
   18-19S 078-44E.
2. CANCEL THIS MSG 200613Z JUL 16.

( 140624Z JUL 2016 )

https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1H3pbysdIKjJE7htHeqgV0FqohUA

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47536
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80445
  • Likes Given: 36399
Updated weather forecast attached. No change to percentages, still 90% GO.

Offline Chris Bergin

Support NSF via L2 -- Help improve NSF -- Site Rules/Feedback/Updates
**Not a L2 member? Whitelist this forum in your adblocker to support the site and ensure full functionality.**

Offline Raul

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 352
  • Ústí nad Orlicí, CZECH
  • Liked: 1188
  • Likes Given: 99
Mission presskit
http://www.spacex.com/sites/spacex/files/spacex_crs9_press_kit.pdf
Quote
LAUNCH (experimental landing) AND DRAGON DEPLOYMENT (all times approximate)
Hour/Min/Sec Events
00:01:08 Max Q (moment of peak mechanical stress on the rocket)
00:02:21 1st stage main engine cutoff (MECO)
00:02:24 1st and 2nd stages separate
00:02:32 2nd stage engine starts
00:02:42 1st stage boostback burn begins
00:06:31 1st stage entry burn begins
00:07:38 1st stage landing burn begins
00:09:02 2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
00:09:37 Dragon separates from 2nd stage
00:11 Dragon’s solar arrays deploy
02:19 Dragon’s Guidance, Navigation and Control bay door opens
« Last Edit: 07/16/2016 10:47 am by jacqmans »

Offline Chris Bergin

Static Fire day. Aim was AM (early AM) per schedule, but - as always - they have a several hour window to help them with all milestones such as rollout, erection, prop load and the firing.

A sighting of the F9 on the pad would a good first indication.
Support NSF via L2 -- Help improve NSF -- Site Rules/Feedback/Updates
**Not a L2 member? Whitelist this forum in your adblocker to support the site and ensure full functionality.**

Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Margaritaville Beach Resort South Padre Island
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
1