Author Topic: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)  (Read 74922 times)

Offline zubenelgenubi

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DISCUSSION thread for the rideshare launch of four US government satellites, USA 328-331, along with the Globalstar-2 spare satellite, FM15.

NSF Threads for Globalstar FM15 launch : Discussion

Globalstar Replacement Satellites and Launches

Successful launch June 19, 2022 at 04:27 UTC (12:27 am EDT) from Cape Canaveral SFS SLC-40.  First stage 1061.9 landed on Just Read the Instructions.  There appeared to be an opportunity to drop off another payload at around 535km circular orbit from the empty rideshare adapter that was shown later in the mission. Globalstar deployment orbit around 1120km.



Globalstar-2



Launch Photography Viewing Guide, updated May 27:
Quote
<snip> Other upcoming launches include a Falcon 9 from pad 40 on mid-June. <snip>

The mid June SLC-40 launch: perhaps Starlink 4-19?

There appears to be an open launch slot in mid June at SLC-40.

June 8  Nilesat-301
<open slot>
June 28  SES-22

Starlink 4-19 is currently scheduled for launch from LC-39A, (probably) ASAP after SpX-25 in mid June.

Other Starlink launches are NET July.  Starlink 4-20 is now NET September, previously end of June.

ASAP = As Soon As Possible

Mission 1575, NE trajectory from Florida, NET early June [June 7]
0788-EX-ST-2022

It seems some people out there are thinking this is something like ZUMA?

A different Starlink launch?  Or a short-notice national security launch?  Edit: At minimum, short-notice regarding information available to the informed public.

NextSpaceFlight has added a listing for an unknown payload launch, NET June, from SLC-40. [update June 3]
Quote
Via Launch Photography/FCC Filings.
« Last Edit: 06/20/2022 07:16 pm by gongora »
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Offline scr00chy

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How does the trajectory in the FCC filing compare to a Starlink launch, Zuma or a regular GTO launch?
« Last Edit: 06/05/2022 02:46 pm by scr00chy »

Offline Alexphysics

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How does the trajectory in the FCC filing compare to a Starlink launch, Zuma or a regular GTO launch?

It's a northeast trajectory that would lead to a ~54ļ inclination orbit.

Offline gongora

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A different Starlink launch?  Or a short-notice national security launch?

I don't understand why people think launches we haven't known about are short-notice.  The customer and SpaceX may have known about it for a long time.

Online Zed_Noir

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A different Starlink launch?  Or a short-notice national security launch?

I don't understand why people think launches we haven't known about are short-notice.  The customer and SpaceX may have known about it for a long time.
Because previously there were no convenient launches that can be bumped for "short notice" spook missions with the launcher from the bumped launch being suitable for the spook mission . The Falcon 9 is the same regardless of the payload being launch.


Offline Tomness

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A different Starlink launch?  Or a short-notice national security launch?

I don't understand why people think launches we haven't known about are short-notice.  The customer and SpaceX may have known about it for a long time.

Yep,  be apart of the big boys club, they have to have a rocket available for rapid response from DOD/NRO probably 30-90 days notice. Maybe sooner then that.  Any other customer 3-12 months.

Offline wannamoonbase

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Well this is all very interesting.

There did seem to be a big wide opening on the manifest.  It will be curious to see who the customer is.

For years US DOD was interested in a quick response capability and funded different options.  Maybe this is one of those missions.

However, 54 degrees is awfully close to the Starlink incliation.

Ultimately as long as there is a launch every week, I'm happy.
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Offline Jim

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Yep they have to have a rocket available for rapid response from DOD/NRO probably 30-90 days notice.

No such thing

Offline Alexphysics

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Well this is all very interesting.

There did seem to be a big wide opening on the manifest.  It will be curious to see who the customer is.

For years US DOD was interested in a quick response capability and funded different options.  Maybe this is one of those missions.

However, 54 degrees is awfully close to the Starlink incliation.

Ultimately as long as there is a launch every week, I'm happy.

I can confirm this is not a Starlink launch. It's a mission for the government. I don't know much beyond that tho, all is tight lips after that point.

Offline Phillipsturtles

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Could this possibly be GPS-3-6?

Offline SPKirsch

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Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
« Reply #10 on: 06/07/2022 07:40 am »
« Last Edit: 06/07/2022 07:42 am by SPKirsch »

Offline Tomness

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Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
« Reply #11 on: 06/07/2022 09:21 am »

Yep they have to have a rocket available for rapid response from DOD/NRO probably 30-90 days notice.

No such thing

Fascinating that actually not capably.

Offline Nosu

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Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
« Reply #12 on: 06/07/2022 04:52 pm »
Quote
A spare satellite for Globalstarís data relay and messaging constellation will launch from Cape Canaveral on a Falcon 9 rocket later this month, multiple sources said, in a previously-undisclosed mission on SpaceXís schedule.

Quote
Sources told Spaceflight Now the spacecraft, designated Globalstar FM15, is booked to launch on a Falcon 9 rocket as soon as mid-June. The mission will be the next Falcon 9 launch from pad 40 at Cape Canaveral after the liftoff of the Egyptian Nilesat 301 geostationary communications satellite Wednesday.

Quote
SpaceX and Globalstar have not confirmed if the upcoming launch will be a dedicated ride for the Globalstar payload, or if other satellites might be on-board the Falcon 9.

https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/06/07/globalstar-spare-satellite-to-launch-on-spacex-rocket-this-month/
[June 7]
« Last Edit: 06/07/2022 06:03 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline wannamoonbase

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Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
« Reply #13 on: 06/07/2022 04:56 pm »
Quote
A spare satellite for Globalstarís data relay and messaging constellation will launch from Cape Canaveral on a Falcon 9 rocket later this month, multiple sources said, in a previously-undisclosed mission on SpaceXís schedule.

Quote
Sources told Spaceflight Now the spacecraft, designated Globalstar FM15, is booked to launch on a Falcon 9 rocket as soon as mid-June. The mission will be the next Falcon 9 launch from pad 40 at Cape Canaveral after the liftoff of the Egyptian Nilesat 301 geostationary communications satellite Wednesday.

https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/06/07/globalstar-spare-satellite-to-launch-on-spacex-rocket-this-month/

The story says that the Globalstar payload is 700 kg but that the booster will land down range.  There must be more payloads on this flight. 

This continues to be interesting.
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Online Skyrocket

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
« Reply #14 on: 06/07/2022 05:02 pm »
A single Globalstar sounds strange.
2nd gen Globalstars were always launched in clusters of six (on Soyuz Fregat vehicles). And six satellites are remaining to be launched.
I would have expected that the last cluster would move to Falcon-9 as Soyuz is no longer available.

Also hard to believe, that a single Globalstar-2 would be the sole payload on a Falcon-9.
I would expect other ride-share payloads, but frankly i have no clue what these could be, given that this inclination is not a common orbital destination.
« Last Edit: 06/07/2022 05:20 pm by Skyrocket »

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
« Reply #15 on: 06/07/2022 05:03 pm »
I can't see Globalstar paying for the whole flight to launch a single sat.

Offline scr00chy

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
« Reply #16 on: 06/07/2022 06:13 pm »
Could it be Globalstar + a bunch of Starlink sats? The target inclination fits, right?

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
« Reply #17 on: 06/07/2022 06:26 pm »
Globalstar-2
A single Globalstar sounds strange.
2nd gen Globalstars were always launched in clusters of six (on Soyuz Fregat vehicles). And six satellites are remaining to be launched.
I would have expected that the last cluster would move to Falcon-9 as Soyuz is no longer available.



Edit/add:  Would a launch of a US government satellite + the remaining 6 Globalstar-2 satellites fit the known parameters of the launch?  SFN article is clear one Globalstar-2 satellite is to be launched.

Globalstar-2 mass
700 kg/satellite + dispenser?

What dispenser would be used?  Does Globalstar have a spare from the constellation deployments a decade ago?

What "USA" payloads have launched to a mid-50s degrees inclination LEO orbit?
« Last Edit: 06/07/2022 06:53 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Online Skyrocket

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
« Reply #18 on: 06/07/2022 06:27 pm »
Could it be Globalstar + a bunch of Starlink sats? The target inclination fits, right?
--

Earlier in this thread it was mentioned that it is not a Starlink mission.

Offline Alexphysics

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
« Reply #19 on: 06/07/2022 06:33 pm »
The landing zone doesn't even correspond to that kind of orbital inclination like Starlink, it's like 30 to 50km more to the north, similar to the last few GPS mission landing coordinates (in fact really close to landing coordinates for SV05). I do know that the launch carries government payloads which is in part why it's supposed to be so secretive mission. Apart from that my guess is that Globalstar is launching on this one as rideshare because if it was purchased commercially then SpaceX says on its PUG that they reserve the rights to put on your launch whatever other payload they can put on if there's spare capacity.

That's my 1.24 rubles

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