Author Topic: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)  (Read 77902 times)

Offline Ken the Bin

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Even the 45th Weather Squadron is acting mysteriously.  They still haven't released a forecast since Thursday's L-3 report (70% GO / Low-Moderate booster recovery weather risk), despite it saying the next forecast would be released on Friday.

Unfortunately that's not mysterious, it's just all too typical.

Offline kdhilliard

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Mission patch and timeline.
3 (?!?!?) second stage burns
Quote
...
00:09:58    2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
00:10:00    1st stage landing
...

Quote
00:09:58    2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
00:10:00    1st stage landing

Those are quite late -- even later than for crewed Dragon missions.
Does that imply a very lofted trajectory?
Are they records?

Offline soltasto

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"Press kit" capture with OCR

Offline LouScheffer

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Mission patch and timeline.
3 (?!?!?) second stage burn

00:09:58    2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
00:10:00    1st stage landing
Those are quite late -- even later than for crewed Dragon missions.
Does that imply a very lofted trajectory?
Are they records?
The entry burn (always about 40 km altitude) is at 8:10.  One the recent NileSat, it was 6:28.   That's 102 more seconds of coast, 51 seconds up, and 51 down, so about 500 more vertical m/s  than normal. 

Landing is at 10:00; NileSat was at 8:42.  So if in each case,  it traveled 600 km downrange after cutoff at 2:40, the horizontal speed was less than by 600000/362 - 600000/440 = 293 m/s.

So definitely a very lofted trajectory.

Also, the two second stage burns (at 1:04:02 and 1:47:12) are much longer than the usual circularization burns.  Clearly *something* is being dropped off in-between, and in a significantly different orbit.

Offline jpo234

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Clearly *something* is being dropped off in-between, and in a significantly different orbit.
Will be interesting whether the stream will show the inside of the fairing...
You want to be inspired by things. You want to wake up in the morning and think the future is going to be great. That's what being a spacefaring civilization is all about. It's about believing in the future and believing the future will be better than the past. And I can't think of anything more exciting than being out there among the stars.

Online ZachS09

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With all these factors such as the first Globalstar satellite since 2013, three M-Vac burns, and a potential undisclosed customer; this is looking to be an interesting mission.
Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

Offline Alexphysics

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Or even the fact that not even Globalstar has acknowledged this mission for some reason...  :o

Offline Comga

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Clearly *something* is being dropped off in-between, and in a significantly different orbit.
Will be interesting whether the stream will show the inside of the fairing...

Thatís really a question with all this secrecy?

What will be truly interesting is whether or not they even show the first stage telemetry.
If they donít itís likely because they have noticed how much information OneSpeed is pulling out of it. 😁
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline russianhalo117

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Or even the fact that not even Globalstar has acknowledged this mission for some reason...  :o
Well Globalstar originally baselined Russian built rockets to launch their entire second generation fleet including the now lone surviving spare and are likely in the lower slot if the other primary payload(s) are confirmed. The Globalstar FM15 (fleet number 87) could in one scenario be an Arianespace/Starsem transfer. Note that Globalstar cancelled its remaining Gen2 launch contracts for sats 87 and 98-120 (the latter Group of fleet numbers after manufacturing long being cancelled was reassigned to the 2022 Gen3 manufacturing contract) in the wake of the 2014 Crimea "special Russian military peacekeeping operation".
« Last Edit: 06/18/2022 11:20 pm by russianhalo117 »

Offline Rondaz

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The third SpaceX launch of the weekend comes with a mystery. A drone ship recovery and three planned upper stage burns prompt questions about whether Globalstar-2 FM15 is the only satellite launching early Sunday morning.

https://twitter.com/TGMetsFan98/status/1538269684105154561

Offline Rondaz

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Just Read the Instructions droneship is on-station approximately 659 km downrange in the Atlantic Ocean for the Globalstar-2 (+ others!) mission. NE trajectory.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1538285196214210560

Offline Rondaz

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Orbital Launch no. 67 of 2022

Globalstar-2 | SpaceX | June 19 | 0027 ET

@SpaceX to launch telecommunication #Globalstar-2 M087 for @Globalstar Ė for Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) Ė atop a #Falcon9 FT with booster #B1061.9 from  @SLDelta45 SLC-40.

https://twitter.com/SpaceIntellige3/status/1538263443677057025

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Offline Jrcraft

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Mission patch and timeline.
3 (?!?!?) second stage burn

00:09:58    2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
00:10:00    1st stage landing
Those are quite late -- even later than for crewed Dragon missions.
Does that imply a very lofted trajectory?
Are they records?
The entry burn (always about 40 km altitude) is at 8:10.  One the recent NileSat, it was 6:28.   That's 102 more seconds of coast, 51 seconds up, and 51 down, so about 500 more vertical m/s  than normal. 

Landing is at 10:00; NileSat was at 8:42.  So if in each case,  it traveled 600 km downrange after cutoff at 2:40, the horizontal speed was less than by 600000/362 - 600000/440 = 293 m/s.

So definitely a very lofted trajectory.

Also, the two second stage burns (at 1:04:02 and 1:47:12) are much longer than the usual circularization burns.  Clearly *something* is being dropped off in-between, and in a significantly different orbit.

Just thinking out loud, but would they need to reduce G loading on the satellite? It's an older satellite designed to fly with 5 others on a Soyuz. It's the only reason I can think of (besides a secondary payload) for the lofted flight and increased second stage burn time.

Offline pb2000

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Or even the fact that not even Globalstar has acknowledged this mission for some reason...  :o
It was alluded to in their Q1 '22 brief.

Quote from: Globalstar
As previously announced, we entered into a satellite procurement agreement with Macdonald, Dettwiler and Associates Corporation in February. These new satellites will ensure continuity of service to all of our existing and future subscribers as well as other users of the network. We also plan to launch our on-ground spare satellite in the coming months that will serve the same purpose.

Maybe SpaceX is trying to get the launch contract for the next gen sats locked down before any BE-4 powered vehicle makes it to the pad. Still doesn't explain the ASDS landing though...
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Mission patch and timeline.
3 (?!?!?) second stage burn

00:09:58    2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
00:10:00    1st stage landing
Those are quite late -- even later than for crewed Dragon missions.
Does that imply a very lofted trajectory?
Are they records?
The entry burn (always about 40 km altitude) is at 8:10.  One the recent NileSat, it was 6:28.   That's 102 more seconds of coast, 51 seconds up, and 51 down, so about 500 more vertical m/s  than normal. 

Landing is at 10:00; NileSat was at 8:42.  So if in each case,  it traveled 600 km downrange after cutoff at 2:40, the horizontal speed was less than by 600000/362 - 600000/440 = 293 m/s.

So definitely a very lofted trajectory.

Also, the two second stage burns (at 1:04:02 and 1:47:12) are much longer than the usual circularization burns.  Clearly *something* is being dropped off in-between, and in a significantly different orbit.

So I've checked some previous records, this timeline is actually pretty similar to Transporter-1, with Transporter-4 actually landing even later at around 10:30 and the record seems to went to FORMOSAT-5 at around T+10:45! Though I'm not sure the fact that the first two had a big dog-leg and the 3rd was an older generation v1.2 would change the conclusion that much.

I'm still trying to think of the thing on top as another X-37...
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Offline su27k

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I wonder if the entire purpose of having Globalstar onboard is to give this mission a public payload and a name, so that people don't ask too many questions. Without it, this mission would be an unnamed mission with a mystery payload from a unknown customer, even main stream media is not dumb enough to overlook this. Now we have payload, a name, even a 2nd stage mission timeline including payload deployment (which we didn't have in case of SARah-1), all very normal looking, nothing to see here...
« Last Edit: 06/19/2022 01:51 am by su27k »

Offline JayWee

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all very normal looking, nothing to see here...
What were other missions with 3 upper stage firings?

all very normal looking, nothing to see here...
What were other missions with 3 upper stage firings?

Transporter-4 is one with 3 second stage firings.  An initial insertion, then deploy some sats, then raise the orbit with another burn, then circularize with a 3rd burn, followed by another deployment sequence.  Maybe this Globalstar mission will follow a similar deployment sequence with a mystery payload . . .
« Last Edit: 06/19/2022 02:10 am by spacenuance »

Online ZachS09

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all very normal looking, nothing to see here...
What were other missions with 3 upper stage firings?

This may not count, but various missions with two M-Vac burns to place a payload into orbit (excluding GTO missions) are followed up by a deorbit burn, technically making it three altogether.
« Last Edit: 06/19/2022 02:11 am by ZachS09 »
Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

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