Author Topic: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 18 January 2023  (Read 10202 times)

Offline Jansen

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GPS III SV06 “Amelia Earhart” Discussion thread.

For overall discussion of the GPS III program please use the GPS III Program - General Thread

NSF Threads for GPS III SV06 : Discussion

Launch January 18, 2023 on Falcon 9 (reused booster 1077-2) from SLC-40.  ASDS landing is expected. Fairing recovery is expected.



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Space Exploration Technologies Corp., Hawthorne, California, has been awarded a $290,594,130 firm-fixed-price contract for launch services to deliver the GPS III to its intended orbit.  This contract provides launch vehicle production, mission integration/launch operations/spaceflight worthiness and mission unique activities for a GPS III mission, with options for two additional GPS III launch services. Work will be performed in Hawthorne, California; Cape Canaveral Air Force Space Station, Florida; and McGregor, Texas, and is expected to be complete by March 2020.  This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and two offers were received.  Fiscal 2017 and 2018 space procurement funding in the amount of $96,937,905 will be obligated at the time of award.  The Contracting Division, Launch Systems Enterprise Directorate, Space and Missile Systems Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base, California is the contracting activity (FA8811-18-C-0001).

https://www.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1466539//

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NOV 1, 2018

Harris Corporation (NYSE:HRS) has provided Lockheed Martin (NYSE:LMT) with its sixth of ten advanced navigation payloads contracted for the U.S. Air Force’s GPS III satellite program.

The GPS III navigation payload features a Mission Data Unit (MDU) with a unique 70-percent digital design that links atomic clocks, radiation-hardened processors and powerful transmitters – enabling signals three times more accurate than those on current GPS satellites. The payload also boosts signal power, which increases jamming resistance by eight times and helps extend the satellite’s lifespan.
HARRIS CORPORATION DELIVERS SIXTH GPS III SATELLITE NAVIGATION PAYLOAD



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« Last Edit: 11/29/2022 06:51 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : NET Q3 2021
« Reply #1 on: 02/06/2021 09:14 pm »
https://www.losangeles.spaceforce.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/2362230/us-space-forces-space-and-missile-systems-center-announces-landmark-contract-mo/

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U.S. Space Force’s Space and Missile Systems Center announces landmark contract modifications for reuse of SpaceX launch vehicles
/ Published September 25, 2020
LOS ANGELES AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --
The U.S. Space Force’s Space and Missile Systems Center Launch Enterprise and Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX) recently signed a contract modification to reuse a Falcon 9 first-stage booster – for the first time on a National Security Space Launch mission – starting with the fifth Global Positioning System (GPS)-III satellite, scheduled to launch next year.

While SMC’s Launch Enterprise and SpaceX previously signed contract modifications enabling SpaceX to recover boosters for GPS III missions, this landmark “reuse” contract modification is the first of its kind for NSSL missions.

“The United States’ launch industry is the envy of the world,” said Lt. Gen. John F. Thompson, commander of the U.S. Space Force’s Space and Missile Systems Center. “Industry’s innovation has been key to SMC’s success over our 60+ year existence. I am thrilled to welcome SpaceX’s innovative reuse into the National Security Space Launch program!”

“SMC’s commitment to innovative partnerships and working with the commercial sector while maintaining our mission assurance posture and mission-success record cannot be understated,” said Dr. Walt Lauderdale, SMC’s Falcon Systems and Operations Division chief and frequent mission director. “I am proud of our partnership with SpaceX that allowed us to successfully negotiate contract modifications for the upcoming GPS III missions that will save taxpayers $52.7 million while maintaining our unprecedented record of success.”

“SpaceX is proud to leverage Falcon 9’s flight-proven benefits and capabilities for national security space launch missions,” said Gwynne Shotwell, SpaceX’s president and chief operating officer. “We appreciate the effort that the U.S. Space Force invested into the evaluation and are pleased that they see the benefits of the technology. Our extensive experience with reuse has allowed SpaceX to continually upgrade the fleet and save significant precious tax dollars on these launches.”

SpaceX and SMC successfully launched and recovered the GPS III-SV03 booster on June 30, 2020, providing valuable data and insight on reusing the Falcon 9 launch vehicle for future NSSL missions. The booster from the upcoming GPS III-SV04 launch scheduled for Sept. 29 will also be recovered. With this latest contract modification, SMC’s Launch Enterprise agreed to reuse Falcon boosters for GPS III-SV05 and GPS III-SV06, both of which can also be recovered.

The U.S. Space Force’s Space and Missile Systems Center, located at Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo, California, is the center of excellence for acquiring and developing military space systems. SMC’s portfolio includes space launch, global positioning systems, military satellite communications, a defense meteorological satellite control network, range systems, space-based infrared systems, and space situational awareness capabilities.

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : NET Q3 2021
« Reply #2 on: 02/06/2021 09:17 pm »
https://www.esd.whs.mil/Portals/54/Documents/FOID/Reading%20Room/Selected_Acquisition_Reports/FY_2019_SARS/20-F-0568_DOC_35_GPS_III_SAR_Dec_2019_Full.pdf
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SV06 completed Thermal Vacuum testing in November 2019, within a record-setting 58 days, the shortest yet for GPS III.

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : NET Q3 2021
« Reply #3 on: 02/06/2021 09:20 pm »

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : NET Q3 2021
« Reply #4 on: 02/07/2021 01:58 am »
https://www.gps.gov/cgsic/meetings/2020/colburn.pdf
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SV06 Available for Launch Spring 2021

Launch date for GPS has usually been 6 months+ after AFL
« Last Edit: 02/07/2021 01:59 am by Jansen »

Offline Phillipsturtles

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Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #6 on: 05/08/2021 04:22 pm »
https://spacenews.com/space-force-to-clear-reused-falcon-9-booster-for-upcoming-gps-launch/
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The contracts with SpaceX to launch both GPS SV05 and SV06 in 2021 were renegotiated last year to allow reused boosters, saving the government about $64 million, Bongiovi said

Possibility of SV06 in Q4 2021 (Q1 FY2022). A lot depends on how the launch of SV05 and refurbishment goes.

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #7 on: 05/31/2021 10:33 am »
https://spacepolicyonline.com/news/space-force-gets-2-billion-boost-in-fy2022-request/
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The Space Force procurement request includes five national security space launches, compared with three in FY2021, and two GPS III Follow-on satellites, the same as FY2021.

I’m wondering if one of the five NSSLs is for this mission. Explains the slip to FY2022.

Offline su27k

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #8 on: 06/09/2021 03:13 am »
From GAO report: https://www.gao.gov/products/gao-21-222

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While the GPS III program has reported improvements in contractor manufacturing processes over the past few years, the sixth GPS III satellite encountered failures in multiple assemblies during testing, which delayed the satellite’s projected delivery by 8 months to April 2021. Consequently, Lockheed Martin conducted rework on various assemblies, such as the onboard computer and one of the satellite’s atomic clocks. Due to the level of rework, the program carried out an additional thermal vacuum test of the satellite following reassembly. Program officials reported the satellite successfully completed this testing in October 2020.

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #9 on: 06/14/2021 12:47 pm »
https://www.saffm.hq.af.mil/Portals/84/documents/FY22/PROCUREMENT_/FY22%20DAF%20J-Book%20-%203022%20-%20SF%20Proc.pdf?ver=NEFQ6zdjfeGcJFeAdv_97g==#page=61

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SV06 has a projected AFL of April 2021 and a projected ILC of November 2021. SV07 has a projected AFL of May 2021 and a projected ILC of March 2022.

AFL = Available For Launch
ILC = Initial Launch Capability
« Last Edit: 06/14/2021 12:48 pm by Jansen »

Offline scr00chy

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #10 on: 06/14/2021 12:59 pm »
https://www.saffm.hq.af.mil/Portals/84/documents/FY22/PROCUREMENT_/FY22%20DAF%20J-Book%20-%203022%20-%20SF%20Proc.pdf?ver=NEFQ6zdjfeGcJFeAdv_97g==#page=61

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SV06 has a projected AFL of April 2021 and a projected ILC of November 2021. SV07 has a projected AFL of May 2021 and a projected ILC of March 2022.

AFL = Available For Launch
ILC = Initial Launch Capability

Those two sound like the same thing. What does "Available For Launch" actually mean and why is that milestone achieved many months before the actual launch?

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #11 on: 06/14/2021 01:21 pm »
AFL = Available For Launch
ILC = Initial Launch Capability

Those two sound like the same thing. What does "Available For Launch" actually mean and why is that milestone achieved many months before the actual launch?

AFL is basically the handover date from the vendor. The USSF accepts that manufacturing and testing is complete, and either has to take delivery or pay for storage.

ILC is the launch target date.

Offline scr00chy

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #12 on: 06/14/2021 01:25 pm »
Okay, but why is there usually such a long gap between AFL and actual launch? Is there more testing done after AFL?

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #13 on: 06/14/2021 01:43 pm »
Okay, but why is there usually such a long gap between AFL and actual launch? Is there more testing done after AFL?

Depends on the payload. A lot is classified.

Transportation alone from Littleton to the Cape usually takes quite some time. The C-5 Galaxy is not the most reliable aircraft, although the C-5M is a big improvement.

Encapsulation and re-rad testing at Astrotech usually takes some time as well.

But there are also issues like fiscal year budgets and launch contracts to consider. Sometimes a launch is targeted for the start of a new fiscal year for funding reasons. And leaving a gap makes sense for contingency purposes. So mostly it is sitting there waiting for the launch vehicle to be ready so it can be called up.

The 13 month gap for SV05 was for validation of reuse processes. That’s not usual for the program.
« Last Edit: 06/14/2021 01:49 pm by Jansen »

Offline Jim

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #14 on: 06/14/2021 01:53 pm »
Okay, but why is there usually such a long gap between AFL and actual launch? Is there more testing done after AFL?

Getting the spacecraft ready for transport.  Once at the launch site, there is post shipment testing, propellant loading and encapsulation and integrated ops.

Other constraints, there might not be a launch slot available or a launch slot was not procured until a certain time.
These are replenishment satellites, there might not be an immediate need for launch.
« Last Edit: 06/14/2021 02:02 pm by Jim »

Offline Jim

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #15 on: 06/14/2021 01:56 pm »

Depends on the payload. A lot is classified.


Not really.   No different than non DOD spacecraft.



Transportation alone from Littleton to the Cape usually takes quite some time. The C-5 Galaxy is not the most reliable aircraft, although the C-5M is a big improvement.


Not really.  A.  It really doesn't take much time to prep a spacecraft for shipment.  B. GPS-III uses a C-17

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #16 on: 06/14/2021 01:58 pm »
These are replenishment satellites, there might now be an immediate need for launch.

That’s a good point; they are trying to space the launches out a bit due to the production gap with GPS IIIF.

Edit:
SV10 might be held back in storage a couple of years as a backup for that reason, in case of a failure in an older satellite. A bunch are over 20 years old.
« Last Edit: 06/14/2021 02:04 pm by Jansen »

Offline Jim

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #17 on: 06/14/2021 02:01 pm »
why is that milestone achieved many months before the actual launch?

Spacecraft production and launch are not linked for constellation replenishment satellites.    The contract for production is usually at a rate at expected needed for replenishment.  Where as launch rate is by actual demand and launch system constraints. 

See DSCS-III production and launch rates.

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #18 on: 06/14/2021 06:12 pm »
https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/status/1404459221853298690

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Lockheed Martin VP Tonya Ladwig says the company has the next three GPS III satellites "lined up and ready to be called" for launch at its Denver production facility.

Looks like SV06-08 are AFL

https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/status/1404463589168197637

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Dr. Lauderdale says SMC has "no other constraints" for SpaceX's use of this Falcon 9 booster after the GPS III SV05 launch, and the military is "certainly open to using" other boosters (i.e., not just ones that launched NSSL missions) for the GPS III SV06 launch.

I wonder what levels of experienced boosters they’re open to.
« Last Edit: 06/14/2021 06:17 pm by Jansen »

Offline macpacheco

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Re: SpaceX F9 : GPS III SV06 : Florida : 2022
« Reply #19 on: 06/14/2021 06:38 pm »
why is that milestone achieved many months before the actual launch?

Spacecraft production and launch are not linked for constellation replenishment satellites.    The contract for production is usually at a rate at expected needed for replenishment.  Where as launch rate is by actual demand and launch system constraints. 

See DSCS-III production and launch rates.
USAF made some commitments about having 24 operational L5 GPS birds by 2020. The main purpose was to free GPS operators from changing some characteristics of P-Code that could impact semi codeless users like FAA's WAAS (plus EGNOS, MSAS, ...)
If it were solely due to replenishment, no GPS III would need to be launched to this date.
Plus they look kinda bad with Galileo operational with L5 and L1C in every satellite.
Just sayin.
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