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SpaceX Vehicles and Missions => SpaceX Missions Section => Topic started by: zubenelgenubi on 06/03/2022 10:03 pm

Title: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/03/2022 10:03 pm
DISCUSSION thread for the rideshare launch of four US government satellites, USA 328-331, along with the Globalstar-2 spare satellite, FM15.

NSF Threads for Globalstar FM15 launch : Discussion (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=56471.0)

Globalstar Replacement Satellites and Launches (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=41855.0)

Successful launch June 19, 2022 at 04:27 UTC (12:27 am EDT) from Cape Canaveral SFS SLC-40.  First stage 1061.9 landed on Just Read the Instructions.  There appeared to be an opportunity to drop off another payload at around 535km circular orbit from the empty rideshare adapter that was shown later in the mission. Globalstar deployment orbit around 1120km.



Globalstar-2 (https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/globalstar-2.htm)



Launch Photography Viewing Guide (http://www.launchphotography.com/Launch_Viewing_Guide.html), updated May 27:
Quote
<snip> Other upcoming launches include a Falcon 9 from pad 40 on mid-June. <snip>

The mid June SLC-40 launch: perhaps Starlink 4-19?

There appears to be an open launch slot in mid June at SLC-40.

June 8  Nilesat-301
<open slot>
June 28  SES-22

Starlink 4-19 is currently scheduled for launch from LC-39A, (probably) ASAP after SpX-25 in mid June.

Other Starlink launches are NET July.  Starlink 4-20 is now NET September, previously end of June.

ASAP = As Soon As Possible

Mission 1575, NE trajectory from Florida, NET early June [June 7]
0788-EX-ST-2022 (https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/STA_Print.cfm?mode=current&application_seq=115185&RequestTimeout=1000)

It seems some people out there are thinking this is something like ZUMA?

A different Starlink launch?  Or a short-notice national security launch?  Edit: At minimum, short-notice regarding information available to the informed public.

NextSpaceFlight (https://nextspaceflight.com/launches/details/6968) has added a listing for an unknown payload launch, NET June, from SLC-40. [update June 3]
Quote
Via Launch Photography/FCC Filings.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: scr00chy on 06/05/2022 02:45 pm
How does the trajectory in the FCC filing compare to a Starlink launch, Zuma or a regular GTO launch?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Alexphysics on 06/05/2022 02:50 pm
How does the trajectory in the FCC filing compare to a Starlink launch, Zuma or a regular GTO launch?

It's a northeast trajectory that would lead to a ~54º inclination orbit.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: gongora on 06/05/2022 04:23 pm
A different Starlink launch?  Or a short-notice national security launch?

I don't understand why people think launches we haven't known about are short-notice.  The customer and SpaceX may have known about it for a long time.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Zed_Noir on 06/05/2022 05:33 pm
A different Starlink launch?  Or a short-notice national security launch?

I don't understand why people think launches we haven't known about are short-notice.  The customer and SpaceX may have known about it for a long time.
Because previously there were no convenient launches that can be bumped for "short notice" spook missions with the launcher from the bumped launch being suitable for the spook mission . The Falcon 9 is the same regardless of the payload being launch.

Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Tomness on 06/05/2022 05:55 pm
A different Starlink launch?  Or a short-notice national security launch?

I don't understand why people think launches we haven't known about are short-notice.  The customer and SpaceX may have known about it for a long time.

Yep,  be apart of the big boys club, they have to have a rocket available for rapid response from DOD/NRO probably 30-90 days notice. Maybe sooner then that.  Any other customer 3-12 months.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: wannamoonbase on 06/06/2022 01:59 pm
Well this is all very interesting.

There did seem to be a big wide opening on the manifest.  It will be curious to see who the customer is.

For years US DOD was interested in a quick response capability and funded different options.  Maybe this is one of those missions.

However, 54 degrees is awfully close to the Starlink incliation.

Ultimately as long as there is a launch every week, I'm happy.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Jim on 06/06/2022 06:31 pm

Yep they have to have a rocket available for rapid response from DOD/NRO probably 30-90 days notice.

No such thing
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Alexphysics on 06/06/2022 07:34 pm
Well this is all very interesting.

There did seem to be a big wide opening on the manifest.  It will be curious to see who the customer is.

For years US DOD was interested in a quick response capability and funded different options.  Maybe this is one of those missions.

However, 54 degrees is awfully close to the Starlink incliation.

Ultimately as long as there is a launch every week, I'm happy.

I can confirm this is not a Starlink launch. It's a mission for the government. I don't know much beyond that tho, all is tight lips after that point.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Phillipsturtles on 06/07/2022 07:21 am
Could this possibly be GPS-3-6?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: SPKirsch on 06/07/2022 07:40 am
Could this possibly be GPS-3-6?
Current known launch window is Q4 2022.
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=53035.0
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Tomness on 06/07/2022 09:21 am

Yep they have to have a rocket available for rapid response from DOD/NRO probably 30-90 days notice.

No such thing

Fascinating that actually not capably.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Nosu on 06/07/2022 04:52 pm
Quote
A spare satellite for Globalstar’s data relay and messaging constellation will launch from Cape Canaveral on a Falcon 9 rocket later this month, multiple sources said, in a previously-undisclosed mission on SpaceX’s schedule.

Quote
Sources told Spaceflight Now the spacecraft, designated Globalstar FM15, is booked to launch on a Falcon 9 rocket as soon as mid-June. The mission will be the next Falcon 9 launch from pad 40 at Cape Canaveral after the liftoff of the Egyptian Nilesat 301 geostationary communications satellite Wednesday.

Quote
SpaceX and Globalstar have not confirmed if the upcoming launch will be a dedicated ride for the Globalstar payload, or if other satellites might be on-board the Falcon 9.

https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/06/07/globalstar-spare-satellite-to-launch-on-spacex-rocket-this-month/
[June 7]
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : unknown payload : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: wannamoonbase on 06/07/2022 04:56 pm
Quote
A spare satellite for Globalstar’s data relay and messaging constellation will launch from Cape Canaveral on a Falcon 9 rocket later this month, multiple sources said, in a previously-undisclosed mission on SpaceX’s schedule.

Quote
Sources told Spaceflight Now the spacecraft, designated Globalstar FM15, is booked to launch on a Falcon 9 rocket as soon as mid-June. The mission will be the next Falcon 9 launch from pad 40 at Cape Canaveral after the liftoff of the Egyptian Nilesat 301 geostationary communications satellite Wednesday.

https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/06/07/globalstar-spare-satellite-to-launch-on-spacex-rocket-this-month/

The story says that the Globalstar payload is 700 kg but that the booster will land down range.  There must be more payloads on this flight. 

This continues to be interesting.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Skyrocket on 06/07/2022 05:02 pm
A single Globalstar sounds strange.
2nd gen Globalstars were always launched in clusters of six (on Soyuz Fregat vehicles). And six satellites are remaining to be launched.
I would have expected that the last cluster would move to Falcon-9 as Soyuz is no longer available.

Also hard to believe, that a single Globalstar-2 would be the sole payload on a Falcon-9.
I would expect other ride-share payloads, but frankly i have no clue what these could be, given that this inclination is not a common orbital destination.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: gongora on 06/07/2022 05:03 pm
I can't see Globalstar paying for the whole flight to launch a single sat.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: scr00chy on 06/07/2022 06:13 pm
Could it be Globalstar + a bunch of Starlink sats? The target inclination fits, right?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/07/2022 06:26 pm
Globalstar-2 (https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/globalstar-2.htm)
A single Globalstar sounds strange.
2nd gen Globalstars were always launched in clusters of six (on Soyuz Fregat vehicles). And six satellites are remaining to be launched.
I would have expected that the last cluster would move to Falcon-9 as Soyuz is no longer available.



Edit/add:  Would a launch of a US government satellite + the remaining 6 Globalstar-2 satellites fit the known parameters of the launch?  SFN article is clear one Globalstar-2 satellite is to be launched.

Globalstar-2 mass
700 kg/satellite + dispenser?

What dispenser would be used?  Does Globalstar have a spare from the constellation deployments a decade ago?

What "USA" payloads have launched to a mid-50s degrees inclination LEO orbit?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Skyrocket on 06/07/2022 06:27 pm
Could it be Globalstar + a bunch of Starlink sats? The target inclination fits, right?
--

Earlier in this thread it was mentioned that it is not a Starlink mission.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Alexphysics on 06/07/2022 06:33 pm
The landing zone doesn't even correspond to that kind of orbital inclination like Starlink, it's like 30 to 50km more to the north, similar to the last few GPS mission landing coordinates (in fact really close to landing coordinates for SV05). I do know that the launch carries government payloads which is in part why it's supposed to be so secretive mission. Apart from that my guess is that Globalstar is launching on this one as rideshare because if it was purchased commercially then SpaceX says on its PUG that they reserve the rights to put on your launch whatever other payload they can put on if there's spare capacity.

That's my 1.24 rubles
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: wannamoonbase on 06/07/2022 06:52 pm
The landing zone doesn't even correspond to that kind of orbital inclination like Starlink, it's like 30 to 50km more to the north, similar to the last few GPS mission landing coordinates (in fact really close to landing coordinates for SV05). I do know that the launch carries government payloads which is in part why it's supposed to be so secretive mission. Apart from that my guess is that Globalstar is launching on this one as rideshare because if it was purchased commercially then SpaceX says on its PUG that they reserve the rights to put on your launch whatever other payload they can put on if there's spare capacity.

That's my 1.24 rubles

There is more to this story and that is fine, I respect national security needs.

Still very exciting, will be interesting to see what they show or tell us.  No web cast at all would be cloak and dagger-ish.  As long as everything goes well with launch and recovery.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Zed_Noir on 06/07/2022 07:47 pm
Do we have any information on the disposal of the upper stage for this launch?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: raptorx2 on 06/08/2022 09:18 pm
Wasn't Zuma destined for a 51 degree inclination vs. 52 degree for GSAT?  Zuma was lost on Jan. 2018.  So 4 years ago.  Just about right for a new build, and we would assume that Zuma was very important to the DOD.  Perhaps Northrup agreed to build a replacement and SpaceX agreed to a replacement flight?  (with SpaceX building the dispenser this time)  The sudden appearance of this flight on the manifest seems very "Zumaish"?  And contrary to reports.  Globalstar only has this single spare available.  It was the "Original Proto FM" in Phase 1 of the contract.   Phase 1 included 25 satellites, 24 FM's and a single "Proto-FM"/spare.  24 were launched x6 on 4 Soyuz 2010-2013. The second 24 in Phase 2 were canceled by Thales mostly out of spite.  Thales held 6 sets of "Long lead time" parts for 6 more satellites, and Globalstar announced a "definitive contract" with Thales to build 6 more FM's in late 2011.  Well, I guess Thales didn't feel the same way, and Thales denied that such a contract existed. Obviously, the relationship between Globalstar and Thales was very, very poor.  So there were never 6 more "spares" built.  This Proto-FM has been in "ground storage" for the last 12 years.  The relationship between Thales and Globalstar was so contentious that it is rumored that Globalstar has hired an independent company to perform pre-launch testing for this FM.  Thales refused to revisit it.   My speculation is that SpaceX and Globalstar are/were in negotiations for the launch of their new constellation in 2025/2026 timeframe which was recently revealed with MDA as the manufacturer.

https://investors.globalstar.com/news-releases/news-release-details/globalstar-signs-contract-mda-new-satellites

So perhaps SpaceX threw Globalstar a "pot sweetener"  to add this lone old, (most likely uninsured) relic of a spare on the manifest.  No guarantees.  Could end up back in the ocean.  That is my guess.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: raptorx2 on 06/08/2022 09:45 pm
First Stage Core??   Perhaps 1069.1 is the most obvious choice here.  Last launched in late December (CRS-24), and currently shows a Starlink Mission in August as it's next flight.  If this core is selected, then the importance of the flight becomes evident.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Alexphysics on 06/08/2022 10:13 pm
First Stage Core??   Perhaps 1069.1 is the most obvious choice here.  Last launched in late December (CRS-24), and currently shows a Starlink Mission in August as it's next flight.  If this core is selected, then the importance of the flight becomes evident.

B1069-2 is flying on Starlink Group 4-26 as its next mission
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: raptorx2 on 06/08/2022 11:17 pm
Yes, of course.  I noted the  August Starlink mission assignment in my original post.  But, the mid-June Globalstar launch does not indicate a Booster assignment.  So take a look down the available boosters for a mid-June Launch.  A couple with 11+ roundtrips unassigned.  Only 1069.1 which last launched in December (6 months ago due to damage on hard landing), or 1073.1 launched 25 days ago seem as qualified for a "Zumaish" type of mission.  It is all pure speculation, but they need an available booster on the East Coast.  The list is fairly short, and according to the current (?) assignment list, we think they planned on bringing 1069 back on line for an August launch.  So either 1069 or 1073 seem the most likely candidates.  Now that I think about it.  Perhaps 1073 is the more likely candidate as they used it as a new booter for a Starlink mission as a qualifying run?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Alexphysics on 06/08/2022 11:35 pm
Just because we don't know the booster for this mission it doesn't mean it is not assigned, SpaceX assigns boosters well ahead of time and they obviously know the booster. B1069's second launch is in August on that Starlink mission. It's not a candidate for this mission because then that Starlink mission would be its third launch not its second launch.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: raptorx2 on 06/08/2022 11:43 pm
Got it.  If it were 1069, then SpaceX would indicate the August launch as it's 3rd 1069.3 launch, even though there was no 1069.2 on the manifest.  Got it. 
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/09/2022 08:16 am
No booster assignment yet for this government satellite + Globalstar-2 launch in mid June--which one might it be?

Rotating forward the boosters by oldest available after previous recovery, but not already assigned, gives us: 1073.2 (May 14), 1052.6 (May 18), and perhaps 1061.9 (May 25).

As 1073.2 has a low number of previous flights, and it has had the most time, of any available boosters, to finish any refurbishments required, then, by my deduction, it will perform this launch.

By the same deduction, 1052.6 will launch SES-22.

It's up to the owner of the unidentified satellite as to whether they choose to pay for a Static Fire.

Static Fire for the above, if no one pays for it?  My predictions.

No: 1052.6, 1061.9, 1073.2

No Static Fire means the booster is first and only transported to the pad, with payload stacked, a day or less before liftoff.

Edit June 15: It's 1061.9--shorter turn-around!--one of this year's operational improvements.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: DeanG1967 on 06/10/2022 12:03 pm
Didn't Globalstar Inc win a government contract for the Missile Defense Agency a while back?  Could this launch be tied to that?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : mid June 2022
Post by: Conexion Espacial on 06/11/2022 08:49 pm
NextSpaceFlight (https://nextspaceflight.com/launches/details/6968) indicates that the launch will be on June 19 at 04:30 UTC.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:30 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/14/2022 01:22 pm
Just Read the Instructions droneship has departed Port Canaveral for the upcoming Globalstar-2 (+others) mission.

Tug Finn Falgout is towing.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1536693394461933568
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:30 UTC)
Post by: Josh_from_Canada on 06/15/2022 06:19 am
NextSpaceFlight (https://nextspaceflight.com/launches/details/6968) lists the booster as B1061
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:30 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/15/2022 11:06 am
And SpaceX droneship Just Read the Instructions being towed out to sea by tug Finn Falgout..

https://twitter.com/Harry__Stranger/status/1536887622697512961
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:30 UTC)
Post by: Nosu on 06/15/2022 06:46 pm
targeting 04:25 UTC per

Quote
a Falcon 9 from pad 40 will launch the Globalstar FM15 communication satellite June 19 around 12:25am EDT

http://www.launchphotography.com/Launch_Viewing_Guide.html
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:30 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/15/2022 07:55 pm
Three Falcon 9 launches are scheduled for this weekend!

Friday: Starlink 4-19 (12:08 EDT)
Saturday: SARAH1 + others (06:50 PDT)
Sunday: Globalstar-2 + others (TBD)

https://twitter.com/spacex360/status/1537106489944465410
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:30 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/16/2022 12:51 am
Cross-post:
Notable remarks from Wednesday morning's WDR press conference.

CBT = Charlie Blackwell-Thompson, Launch Director for Exploration Ground Systems
JF = James Free, Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems Development

35:27 (https://youtube.com/watch?v=ppiJSeUxqqo&t=35m27s) CBT: Response to Q from Eric Berger re potential interference from SpaceX's Globalstar FM15 Falcon 9 launch from SLC-40 early (00:40) Sunday morning:
* Will not be an issue.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:25 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/16/2022 12:58 am
Quote
a Falcon 9 from pad 40 will launch the Globalstar FM15 communication satellite June 19 around 12:25am EDT
http://www.launchphotography.com/Launch_Viewing_Guide.html

NextSpaceFlight (https://nextspaceflight.com/launches/details/6968) also now states a 04:25 UTC launch.  [June 15 update]
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:25 UTC)
Post by: su27k on 06/16/2022 05:44 am
Isn't it unusual that it's a few days away from launch and we still don't know the name of the primary payload? Even Zuma was leaked a month ahead. Either SpaceX really up the game in terms of infosec, or people just don't care anymore (oh well it's another launch of the week...)
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:25 UTC)
Post by: Bean Kenobi on 06/16/2022 09:22 am
Isn't it unusual that it's a few days away from launch and we still don't know the name of the primary payload? Even Zuma was leaked a month ahead. Either SpaceX really up the game in terms of infosec, or people just don't care anymore (oh well it's another launch of the week...)

Maybe because Globalstar sat is finally the only payload. It seems the US gov payload is based on nothing real, just speculation based on the fact there was no other information available.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:25 UTC)
Post by: Ken the Bin on 06/16/2022 04:23 pm
L-3 weather forecast.  70% 'Go' for both June 19 and June 20.  Booster Recovery Weather risk is Low-Moderate for June 19.  All other Additional Risk Criteria are Low.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:25 UTC)
Post by: Chinakpradhan on 06/16/2022 04:42 pm
Isn't it unusual that it's a few days away from launch and we still don't know the name of the primary payload? Even Zuma was leaked a month ahead. Either SpaceX really up the game in terms of infosec, or people just don't care anymore (oh well it's another launch of the week...)

Maybe because Globalstar sat is finally the only payload. It seems the US gov payload is based on nothing real, just speculation based on the fact there was no other information available.
then why an asds recovery??
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:25 UTC)
Post by: Bean Kenobi on 06/16/2022 04:49 pm
Isn't it unusual that it's a few days away from launch and we still don't know the name of the primary payload? Even Zuma was leaked a month ahead. Either SpaceX really up the game in terms of infosec, or people just don't care anymore (oh well it's another launch of the week...)

Maybe because Globalstar sat is finally the only payload. It seems the US gov payload is based on nothing real, just speculation based on the fact there was no other information available.
then why an asds recovery??

I know this, and I don't know why the ASDS... but this is only known facts, and as far as we know US Gov payload isn't a fact for the moment.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/16/2022 10:24 pm
Ben Cooper's Launch Photography Viewing Guide (http://www.launchphotography.com/Launch_Viewing_Guide.html), updated June 16, clarifies the launch time to 04:27 UTC.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:25 UTC)
Post by: PreferToLurk on 06/17/2022 02:51 pm

Maybe because Globalstar sat is finally the only payload. It seems the US gov payload is based on nothing real, just speculation based on the fact there was no other information available.
then why an asds recovery??

I know this, and I don't know why the ASDS... but this is only known facts, and as far as we know US Gov payload isn't a fact for the moment.
ASDS is a very important known fact.  SpaceX is not going to spend the cash to send out the ASDS if it is not needed. If it was only Globalstar, that F9 would be landing back at the cape. Maybe it's not a US gov payload, but something is on this mission that is adding mass which has not been disclosed.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Star One on 06/17/2022 03:55 pm

Maybe because Globalstar sat is finally the only payload. It seems the US gov payload is based on nothing real, just speculation based on the fact there was no other information available.
then why an asds recovery??

I know this, and I don't know why the ASDS... but this is only known facts, and as far as we know US Gov payload isn't a fact for the moment.
ASDS is a very important known fact.  SpaceX is not going to spend the cash to send out the ASDS if it is not needed. If it was only Globalstar, that F9 would be landing back at the cape. Maybe it's not a US gov payload, but something is on this mission that is adding mass which has not been disclosed.
Could it only be disclosed after launch. Has this happened before with a national security launch?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: wannamoonbase on 06/17/2022 04:36 pm

Maybe because Globalstar sat is finally the only payload. It seems the US gov payload is based on nothing real, just speculation based on the fact there was no other information available.
then why an asds recovery??

I know this, and I don't know why the ASDS... but this is only known facts, and as far as we know US Gov payload isn't a fact for the moment.
ASDS is a very important known fact.  SpaceX is not going to spend the cash to send out the ASDS if it is not needed. If it was only Globalstar, that F9 would be landing back at the cape. Maybe it's not a US gov payload, but something is on this mission that is adding mass which has not been disclosed.

I don't expect a camera view of the payload or fairing separation.  They'll say it's by customer request, but we'll be seeing a mostly Stage 1 centric flight.  (That's my 2 cent prediction)
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:25 UTC)
Post by: Chinakpradhan on 06/17/2022 06:00 pm

Maybe because Globalstar sat is finally the only payload. It seems the US gov payload is based on nothing real, just speculation based on the fact there was no other information available.
then why an asds recovery??

I know this, and I don't know why the ASDS... but this is only known facts, and as far as we know US Gov payload isn't a fact for the moment.
ASDS is a very important known fact.  SpaceX is not going to spend the cash to send out the ASDS if it is not needed. If it was only Globalstar, that F9 would be landing back at the cape. Maybe it's not a US gov payload, but something is on this mission that is adding mass which has not been disclosed.
that might be the case
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/17/2022 08:50 pm
We should be able to deduce more when the NOTAMs and/or NOTMARs are published.

The amateur astronomer satellite watchers, both optical and radio, will provide their observations and analysis as well.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Conexion Espacial on 06/17/2022 09:03 pm
https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1537903555666817025
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: LH2NHI on 06/18/2022 02:14 am

Isn't it unusual that it's a few days away from launch and we still don't know the name of the primary payload? Even Zuma was leaked a month ahead. Either SpaceX really up the game in terms of infosec, or people just don't care anymore (oh well it's another launch of the week...)

Maybe because Globalstar sat is finally the only payload. It seems the US gov payload is based on nothing real, just speculation based on the fact there was no other information available.
then why an asds recovery??

I know this, and I don't know why the ASDS... but this is only known facts, and as far as we know US Gov payload isn't a fact for the moment.

The lightness of Globalstar-FM15 and the need to use ASDS suggest that a private payload has been added.
If the private mission is not a military mission, could it be a SpaceX internal mission?

For example, Starship's TPS experiment re-entry vehicle
or the larger Starlink V2 Mass / Electrical Simulator
or Starlink V2 dispenser prototype
 and so on.

Is it possible to exclude this possibility from the presence or absence of FCC application?
If they are only using second-stage telemetry for such tests, is it impossible to make a distinction in the FCC application?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Zed_Noir on 06/18/2022 05:39 am
It could be some kind of feint against the usual suspects by the spooks with this launch. Put a disguised stripped down satellite propulsion bus with attitude control and communication systems on the upper stage as a fake NRO surveillance satellite. It is just pocket change for the spooks to pay SpaceX to send an ASDS barge out on a decoy mission.

This nutty theory could explain all the abnormalities for this launch. Especially if SpaceX don't stream visuals of the payload on top of the upper stage for this launch.  :)

Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Raul on 06/18/2022 03:34 pm
LHA map for #Globalstar FM15 from CCSFS SLC-40 NET 19 Jun 04:27 UTC, alternatively 20 to 25 Jun based on issued NOTMAR/NOTAMs. B1061.9 planned landing and roughly estimated fairing recovery approx. 655km downrange. Stage2 debris reentry in Pacific Ocean. http://bit.do/LHA18

https://twitter.com/Raul74Cz/status/1538182168475799553
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/18/2022 03:45 pm
And that's the whole weird thing about this launch. ASDS landing, but a single Globalstar satellite only weighs 700kg. Another secret satellite has to be on board.

https://twitter.com/GewoonLukas_/status/1538182757544873986
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: crandles57 on 06/18/2022 04:14 pm
Are TLEs released for this and/or SARah-1 launch?
Will that tell us how many satellites?

(presumably doesn't tell us if there is something that stays attached to the Globalstar sat.)
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: kdhilliard on 06/18/2022 05:10 pm
Even the 45th Weather Squadron (https://www.patrick.spaceforce.mil/About-Us/Weather/) is acting mysteriously.  They still haven't released a forecast since Thursday's L-3 report (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=56471.msg2377888#msg2377888) (70% GO / Low-Moderate booster recovery weather risk), despite it saying the next forecast would be released on Friday.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: RocketLover0119 on 06/18/2022 07:33 pm
Mission patch and timeline.

3 (?!?!?) second stage burns
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Conexion Espacial on 06/18/2022 07:33 pm
SpaceX livestream
https://youtu.be/94cClvOFWH4
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: JayWee on 06/18/2022 07:56 pm
3 (?!?!?) second stage burns
How well does the launch azimuth match the target orbit?
Couldn't the ASDS landing be the result of a severe dogleg akin to IXPE? (325kg, but 653 km downrange ASDS)
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 06/18/2022 08:12 pm
Photos from SpaceX website
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Ken the Bin on 06/18/2022 08:28 pm
Even the 45th Weather Squadron (https://www.patrick.spaceforce.mil/About-Us/Weather/) is acting mysteriously.  They still haven't released a forecast since Thursday's L-3 report (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=56471.msg2377888#msg2377888) (70% GO / Low-Moderate booster recovery weather risk), despite it saying the next forecast would be released on Friday.

Unfortunately that's not mysterious, it's just all too typical.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: kdhilliard on 06/18/2022 08:31 pm
Mission patch and timeline.
3 (?!?!?) second stage burns
Quote
...
00:09:58    2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
00:10:00    1st stage landing
...

Quote
00:09:58    2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
00:10:00    1st stage landing

Those are quite late -- even later than for crewed Dragon missions.
Does that imply a very lofted trajectory?
Are they records?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: soltasto on 06/18/2022 09:19 pm
"Press kit" capture with OCR
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: LouScheffer on 06/18/2022 09:20 pm
Mission patch and timeline.
3 (?!?!?) second stage burn

00:09:58    2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
00:10:00    1st stage landing
Those are quite late -- even later than for crewed Dragon missions.
Does that imply a very lofted trajectory?
Are they records?
The entry burn (always about 40 km altitude) is at 8:10.  One the recent NileSat, it was 6:28.   That's 102 more seconds of coast, 51 seconds up, and 51 down, so about 500 more vertical m/s  than normal. 

Landing is at 10:00; NileSat was at 8:42.  So if in each case,  it traveled 600 km downrange after cutoff at 2:40, the horizontal speed was less than by 600000/362 - 600000/440 = 293 m/s.

So definitely a very lofted trajectory.

Also, the two second stage burns (at 1:04:02 and 1:47:12) are much longer than the usual circularization burns.  Clearly *something* is being dropped off in-between, and in a significantly different orbit.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: jpo234 on 06/18/2022 09:39 pm
Clearly *something* is being dropped off in-between, and in a significantly different orbit.
Will be interesting whether the stream will show the inside of the fairing...
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: ZachS09 on 06/18/2022 10:59 pm
With all these factors such as the first Globalstar satellite since 2013, three M-Vac burns, and a potential undisclosed customer; this is looking to be an interesting mission.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Alexphysics on 06/18/2022 11:01 pm
Or even the fact that not even Globalstar has acknowledged this mission for some reason...  :o
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Comga on 06/18/2022 11:08 pm
Clearly *something* is being dropped off in-between, and in a significantly different orbit.
Will be interesting whether the stream will show the inside of the fairing...

That’s really a question with all this secrecy?

What will be truly interesting is whether or not they even show the first stage telemetry.
If they don’t it’s likely because they have noticed how much information OneSpeed is pulling out of it. 😁
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: russianhalo117 on 06/18/2022 11:19 pm
Or even the fact that not even Globalstar has acknowledged this mission for some reason...  :o
Well Globalstar originally baselined Russian built rockets to launch their entire second generation fleet including the now lone surviving spare and are likely in the lower slot if the other primary payload(s) are confirmed. The Globalstar FM15 (fleet number 87) could in one scenario be an Arianespace/Starsem transfer. Note that Globalstar cancelled its remaining Gen2 launch contracts for sats 87 and 98-120 (the latter Group of fleet numbers after manufacturing long being cancelled was reassigned to the 2022 Gen3 manufacturing contract) in the wake of the 2014 Crimea "special Russian military peacekeeping operation".
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/18/2022 11:39 pm
The third SpaceX launch of the weekend comes with a mystery. A drone ship recovery and three planned upper stage burns prompt questions about whether Globalstar-2 FM15 is the only satellite launching early Sunday morning.

https://twitter.com/TGMetsFan98/status/1538269684105154561
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/18/2022 11:42 pm
Just Read the Instructions droneship is on-station approximately 659 km downrange in the Atlantic Ocean for the Globalstar-2 (+ others!) mission. NE trajectory.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1538285196214210560
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/18/2022 11:46 pm
Orbital Launch no. 67 of 2022

Globalstar-2 | SpaceX | June 19 | 0027 ET

@SpaceX to launch telecommunication #Globalstar-2 M087 for @Globalstar – for Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) – atop a #Falcon9 FT with booster #B1061.9 from  @SLDelta45 SLC-40.

https://twitter.com/SpaceIntellige3/status/1538263443677057025
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 06/19/2022 12:16 am
https://youtu.be/W40YFNse9TE
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Jrcraft on 06/19/2022 12:20 am
Mission patch and timeline.
3 (?!?!?) second stage burn

00:09:58    2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
00:10:00    1st stage landing
Those are quite late -- even later than for crewed Dragon missions.
Does that imply a very lofted trajectory?
Are they records?
The entry burn (always about 40 km altitude) is at 8:10.  One the recent NileSat, it was 6:28.   That's 102 more seconds of coast, 51 seconds up, and 51 down, so about 500 more vertical m/s  than normal. 

Landing is at 10:00; NileSat was at 8:42.  So if in each case,  it traveled 600 km downrange after cutoff at 2:40, the horizontal speed was less than by 600000/362 - 600000/440 = 293 m/s.

So definitely a very lofted trajectory.

Also, the two second stage burns (at 1:04:02 and 1:47:12) are much longer than the usual circularization burns.  Clearly *something* is being dropped off in-between, and in a significantly different orbit.

Just thinking out loud, but would they need to reduce G loading on the satellite? It's an older satellite designed to fly with 5 others on a Soyuz. It's the only reason I can think of (besides a secondary payload) for the lofted flight and increased second stage burn time.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: pb2000 on 06/19/2022 12:39 am
Or even the fact that not even Globalstar has acknowledged this mission for some reason...  :o
It was alluded to in their Q1 '22 brief.

Quote from: Globalstar
As previously announced, we entered into a satellite procurement agreement with Macdonald, Dettwiler and Associates Corporation in February. These new satellites will ensure continuity of service to all of our existing and future subscribers as well as other users of the network. We also plan to launch our on-ground spare satellite in the coming months that will serve the same purpose.

Maybe SpaceX is trying to get the launch contract for the next gen sats locked down before any BE-4 powered vehicle makes it to the pad. Still doesn't explain the ASDS landing though...
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 06/19/2022 01:48 am
Mission patch and timeline.
3 (?!?!?) second stage burn

00:09:58    2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
00:10:00    1st stage landing
Those are quite late -- even later than for crewed Dragon missions.
Does that imply a very lofted trajectory?
Are they records?
The entry burn (always about 40 km altitude) is at 8:10.  One the recent NileSat, it was 6:28.   That's 102 more seconds of coast, 51 seconds up, and 51 down, so about 500 more vertical m/s  than normal. 

Landing is at 10:00; NileSat was at 8:42.  So if in each case,  it traveled 600 km downrange after cutoff at 2:40, the horizontal speed was less than by 600000/362 - 600000/440 = 293 m/s.

So definitely a very lofted trajectory.

Also, the two second stage burns (at 1:04:02 and 1:47:12) are much longer than the usual circularization burns.  Clearly *something* is being dropped off in-between, and in a significantly different orbit.

So I've checked some previous records, this timeline is actually pretty similar to Transporter-1, with Transporter-4 actually landing even later at around 10:30 and the record seems to went to FORMOSAT-5 at around T+10:45! Though I'm not sure the fact that the first two had a big dog-leg and the 3rd was an older generation v1.2 would change the conclusion that much.

I'm still trying to think of the thing on top as another X-37...
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: su27k on 06/19/2022 01:50 am
I wonder if the entire purpose of having Globalstar onboard is to give this mission a public payload and a name, so that people don't ask too many questions. Without it, this mission would be an unnamed mission with a mystery payload from a unknown customer, even main stream media is not dumb enough to overlook this. Now we have payload, a name, even a 2nd stage mission timeline including payload deployment (which we didn't have in case of SARah-1), all very normal looking, nothing to see here...
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: JayWee on 06/19/2022 01:52 am
all very normal looking, nothing to see here...
What were other missions with 3 upper stage firings?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: spacenuance on 06/19/2022 01:59 am
all very normal looking, nothing to see here...
What were other missions with 3 upper stage firings?

Transporter-4 is one with 3 second stage firings.  An initial insertion, then deploy some sats, then raise the orbit with another burn, then circularize with a 3rd burn, followed by another deployment sequence.  Maybe this Globalstar mission will follow a similar deployment sequence with a mystery payload . . .
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: ZachS09 on 06/19/2022 02:01 am
all very normal looking, nothing to see here...
What were other missions with 3 upper stage firings?

This may not count, but various missions with two M-Vac burns to place a payload into orbit (excluding GTO missions) are followed up by a deorbit burn, technically making it three altogether.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Ken the Bin on 06/19/2022 02:15 am
Finally!  L-1 weather forecast.  60% 'Go' for June 19.  80% 'Go' for June 20.  Booster Recovery Weather risk is Low-Moderate for June 19.  Upper-Level Wind Shear risk is Moderate for June 20.  All other Additional Risk Criteria are Low.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: LH2NHI on 06/19/2022 02:29 am
Perhaps the three upper stage engine start this time are due to plans to launch the Globalstar satellite directly at an operational altitude of 1410km instead of the usual 920km?

I'm also curious about how to attach only one satellite to the payload dispenser.
Normally, it should be an adapter that supports batch launching of 6 satellites. Is it a custom order?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: LH2NHI on 06/19/2022 03:03 am
However, if I think in common sense, satellites of this size should be able to direct burn insertion or at least elliptical parking orbit + apogee kick, and ASDS should not be necessary.

Ignition of the second stage three times is still strange in this mission, Is it a orbital inclination change?

SES1-SECO:7min 15sec
SES2-SECO2:4sec
SES3-SECO3:8sec
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Phillipsturtles on 06/19/2022 03:11 am
Well this makes it even more interesting https://twitter.com/StephenClark1/status/1538342187859161089
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Orbiter on 06/19/2022 03:32 am
Well this makes it even more interesting https://twitter.com/StephenClark1/status/1538342187859161089

That doesn't seem totally surprising to me. Whatever the secondary payload (s) might be may not be required to in a particular orbital plane.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Ken the Bin on 06/19/2022 03:44 am
Mission Control Audio (video id 4riRoJWRE_Y):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4riRoJWRE_Y
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: daveglo on 06/19/2022 03:52 am
So, a fascinating tidbit:  The normal weather display video from KSC has been replaced with the static display shown below.

Curiouser and curiouser . . . .
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: LouScheffer on 06/19/2022 03:59 am
However, if I think in common sense, satellites of this size should be able to direct burn insertion or at least elliptical parking orbit + apogee kick, and ASDS should not be necessary.

Ignition of the second stage three times is still strange in this mission, Is it a orbital inclination change?

SES1-SECO:7min 15sec
SES2-SECO2:4sec
SES3-SECO3:8sec

This is roughly compatible with this sequence:
(a) Launch into a 200 x 3200 km orbit (2 hour period)
(b) coast to 3200 km (about 1 hour, half an orbit)
(c) SECO2 to convert to a 1200 x 3200 orbit (dv about 240 m/s)
(d) release payload 'X'
(e) coast to bottom of orbit
(f) SECO3 to circularize at 1200 x 1200 (dv about 420 m/s)
(g) release Globalstar

Numbers are VERY approximate, but this roughly matches the burn durations and timings.

Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/19/2022 04:09 am
T-20 minutes
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: daveglo on 06/19/2022 04:11 am
Stage 2 LOx load started (via MC audio).
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/19/2022 04:20 am
SpaceX, finally
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: daveglo on 06/19/2022 04:26 am
Stage 2 LOx load complete.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/19/2022 04:28 am
Liftoff!
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Orbiter on 06/19/2022 04:32 am
No video updates will be given on the progress of the second stage via SpaceX
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: ZachS09 on 06/19/2022 04:39 am
No video updates will be given on the progress of the second stage via SpaceX

We did see SES-1 (Second Engine Start-1) on the Stage 2 camera, then the feed was cut.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: LouScheffer on 06/19/2022 04:41 am
As suspected, no shots of fairing jettison.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Jarnis on 06/19/2022 04:41 am
No images shown from the front facing second stage camera, no fairing separation shown (or even mentioned!)

Very suspicious, and only reason that I can think of as to why... there is more inside the fairing than just Globalstar FM15.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Zed_Noir on 06/19/2022 04:42 am
Interesting that SpaceX have the upper stage telemetry readout on the webcast.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Lars-J on 06/19/2022 04:42 am
The stage landing (and orbital insertion) was a success:

https://twitter.com/nasaspaceflight/status/1538380876815417344?s=21&t=bTj2z2T2uwvkImelXYXdbQ
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: gongora on 06/19/2022 04:45 am
Anyone want to explain what this "parking orbit" has to do with launching a Globalstar sat?  ::)
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: t21jj on 06/19/2022 04:46 am
If there is a second payload they really don't want to talk about it.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: OneSpeed on 06/19/2022 04:47 am
Anyone want to explain what this "parking orbit" has to do with launching a Globalstar sat?  ::)

Looks like the mission profile could be:

1. Direct injection into a 533 x 533km orbit (1:34:51 period)
2. Release payload 'X'
3. SES2 to raise apogee to a 533 x 1200km (ΔV about 174 m/s)
4. SES3 to circularise at 1200 x 1200km (ΔV about 170 m/s)
5. Release Globalstar.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 06/19/2022 04:48 am
https://twitter.com/Cosmic_Penguin/status/1538380777129332736?s=20&t=KcDa7NT57lU5u8yPxh6CTw

Can we get an orbit parameter judging from the altitude and velocity readouts (the change in them after SECO-1 for example), plus inclination from drop zones?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/19/2022 04:49 am
MECO > Stage 1/2 separation > SEI-1 > fairing separation (not shown, and payload(s) not shown either)
Hmmm

Night vision video shows rocket activity, city light pollution, and lightning illuminating thunderstorms.

More launch progress graphics than usual.  ::)
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 and unknown : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/19/2022 04:53 am
Entry burn > landing burn > successful JRTI landing > SECO-1 (no video coverage of this)
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: LH2NHI on 06/19/2022 04:53 am
No images shown from the front facing second stage camera, no fairing separation shown (or even mentioned!)

Very suspicious, and only reason that I can think of as to why... there is more inside the fairing than just Globalstar FM15.


・They do not deliver fairing separation footage
・They don't even try to explain the situation.
・But they will deliver the second telemetry and also the orbit map.


I have no idea the position of this mission.
Is this a top secret defense mission hidden in a commercial mission?
Or is there a SpaceX in-house secret experiment payload?
Or is this their epic joke and are we being teased?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Globalstar FM15 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Zed_Noir on 06/19/2022 04:58 am
If there is a second payload they really don't want to talk about it.
Hence SpaceX have their smoothest talking announcer continuously talking to distract viewers from the abnormalities of this launch. Jessie Anderson has been MIA from launch webcast lately.   
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Lars-J on 06/19/2022 05:01 am
Zuma reborn!?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: su27k on 06/19/2022 05:02 am
They're pretending this is just a normal launch, but without 2nd stage video, crazy ;D

I wonder if they'll start showing 2nd stage video after they leave this initial orbit.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: ZachS09 on 06/19/2022 05:03 am
ZUMA reborn!?

Better not be. I hope whatever payload separation device is used works properly.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/19/2022 05:10 am
As we wait for SEI-2, graphics and Starfish Prime's funky tunes.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: russianhalo117 on 06/19/2022 05:13 am
ZUMA reborn!?

Better not be. I hope whatever payload separation device is used works properly.
It is strongly hinted in the NSF launch article.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/19/2022 05:36 am
SEI-2 > SECO-2

1st view forward on 2nd stage!  What was on top of the frame of triangular units?

More views of same as we see the usual preprogrammed rotation of external 2nd stage rocketcam views--stage is in view of the Tasmania ground station.

Yes, video stops with expected Tasmania ground station loss of signal.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: russianhalo117 on 06/19/2022 05:36 am
FM15 nominal orbit insertion callout after SES-2/SECO-2 and  Stage-2 and payload views have been resumed.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Jarnis on 06/19/2022 05:37 am
Front view was shown. Definitely looks like a dispenser that had something else on top of FM15.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/19/2022 05:42 am
1st view forward on 2nd stage!  What was on top of the frame of  triangular units?
Southpark Officer Bar Brady: Nothing to see here! Move along!
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: su27k on 06/19/2022 05:45 am
Front view was shown. Definitely looks like a dispenser that had something else on top of FM15.

Nice, at least we know it's separated successfully this time. Otherwise with no customer claiming the payload we won't even know what happened to it...
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Phillipsturtles on 06/19/2022 05:48 am
Looks like the same deployer for Starlink on the Transporter missions
https://twitter.com/GewoonLukas_/status/1538395956848349185
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Jarnis on 06/19/2022 05:52 am
If there was just a stack of Starlinks on top for "ballast", why that would not be disclosed?

The altitude of the parking orbit was very close to operational starlink orbit (535km vs 550km) and inclination was off by 1 degree (52 vs 53) but if that is the explanation, why the secrecy?

I guess we'd know if some new Starlink sat TLEs appear, not like they could keep them off the books if its just in-house payload.

And looking closely, the adapter looks similar, but not exactly the same. So probably not the explanation.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: russianhalo117 on 06/19/2022 05:53 am
Looks like the same deployer for Starlink on the Transporter missions
https://twitter.com/GewoonLukas_/status/1538395956848349185
There are differences. There were DoD/SDA Starlink bus related pressers and discussion in the past. SDA test and evaluation payloads have launched on several different rockets and spacecraft to to date with PIRPL being one of them.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/19/2022 05:56 am
As we wait for SEI-3 and the (final) spacecraft separation, graphics and Starfish Prime's funky tunes.

Second stage telemetry display updates with Vandenberg acquisition of signal.  See change of altitude.

Second stage video views restored.

West coast USA satellite observers with clear skies may have gotten mystery satellite observations several minutes (circa 1 hr, 40 minutes elapsed time)--satellite sunlit, night on the surface.  A mystery satellite released after SECO-1 in a lower orbit would arrive sooner than the second stage.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 06/19/2022 05:58 am
https://spacenews.com/spacex-l3harris-win-space-development-agency-contracts-to-build-missile-warning-satellites/ (https://spacenews.com/spacex-l3harris-win-space-development-agency-contracts-to-build-missile-warning-satellites/)

This reminds me of SpaceX winning part of the DoD Space Development Agency Tracking Layer Tranche 0 LEO missile warning satellite contracts (along with L3 Harris) using the Starlink satellite bus. These aren't supposed to launch until September 2022 at the earliest (also on Falcon 9 along with LEO communication Transport Layer Tranche 0 satellites, by Lockheed Martin and York Space Systems, but to polar orbit from Vandenberg), but I can see SpaceX sending some test satellites up to orbit either at their own plans or by some unique US Government requirements earlier to mid-inclination LEO.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: russianhalo117 on 06/19/2022 06:06 am
https://spacenews.com/spacex-l3harris-win-space-development-agency-contracts-to-build-missile-warning-satellites/ (https://spacenews.com/spacex-l3harris-win-space-development-agency-contracts-to-build-missile-warning-satellites/)

This reminds me of SpaceX winning part of the DoD Space Development Agency Tracking Layer Tranche 0 LEO missile warning satellite contracts (along with L3 Harris) using the Starlink satellite bus. These aren't supposed to launch until September 2022 at the earliest (also on Falcon 9 along with LEO communication Transport Layer Tranche 0 satellites, by Lockheed Martin and York Space Systems, but to polar orbit from Vandenberg), but I can see SpaceX sending some test satellites up to orbit either at their own plans or by some unique US Government requirements earlier to mid-inclination LEO.

For related reference PIRPL was the Cygnus hosted and deployed OPIR test payload.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: russianhalo117 on 06/19/2022 06:18 am
Nominal orbit insertion post SES-3/SECO-3.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/19/2022 06:19 am
SEI-3 > SECO-3
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: daveglo on 06/19/2022 06:21 am
Just witnessed SES-3 from the ground outside St. Louis.  AWESOME!

To add: did NOT observe any leading/following objects.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: russianhalo117 on 06/19/2022 06:21 am
FM15 deploy scheduled and confirmed.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 06/19/2022 06:23 am
https://twitter.com/spacex/status/1538378175977123842

Quote
Liftoff!

https://twitter.com/nasaspaceflight/status/1538378205488459777

Quote
SpaceX Falcon 9 B1061-9 launches Globalstar FM-15 from SLC-40.

Overview:
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2022/06/spacex-globalstar-falcon-9/

Livestream:
youtube.com/watch?v=W40YFNse9TE…
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/19/2022 06:23 am
Spacecraft separation and webcast sign-off!

Congratulations to SpaceX and the entire launch campaign team!

Thank you for the always informative NSF webcast!
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 06/19/2022 06:24 am
https://twitter.com/nasaspaceflight/status/1538379094727004160

Quote
Staging 1-2. Thunderstorms below!
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 06/19/2022 06:25 am
https://twitter.com/nasaspaceflight/status/1538380876815417344

Quote
Falcon 9 B1061-9 lands on SpaceX Drone Ship "Just Read the Instructions".

Three Falcon 9 launches, three recoveries, in 36 hours!

Now up to 126 successful Falcon booster recoveries.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 06/19/2022 06:27 am
https://twitter.com/nasaspaceflight/status/1538395884081266688

Quote
SES-2 is complete and that's an interesting setup on the front end of the Second Stage.

https://twitter.com/nasaspaceflight/status/1538407014749159425

Quote
S/C Sep for Globalstar FM-15 (the other passenger is a mystery). Three successful missions in under two days.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 06/19/2022 06:47 am
https://twitter.com/johnkrausphotos/status/1538382364270813189

Quote
Falcon 9 streaks to orbit at 12:27 a.m. EDT this morning with the Globalstar FM15 satellite

https://twitter.com/mdcainjr/status/1538387215465725952

Quote
Just after midnight #SpaceX launches a spare #GlobalStar satellite towards orbit from launch complex 40!

📸 by me for @SpaceflightNow
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/19/2022 10:59 am
For comparison: 6 Globalstar-2 stacked on 2 layers on top of the Fregat upper stage at Baikonur, January 2013 (photo by I think
@Arianespace, via @nicolas_pillet)

https://twitter.com/Cosmic_Penguin/status/1538396650628317184
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/19/2022 11:03 am
Updating / Update

Just 25 days after its last use, the B1061 booster successfully makes its ninth launch.

https://twitter.com/SpaceNosey/status/1538431298334867456
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: su27k on 06/19/2022 11:51 am
https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1538394661483687936

Quote
Congrats to SpaceX Falcon team for executing 3 flawless launches in 2 days!

Note this is sent at around T+1:07:00, just after SES-2.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: LouScheffer on 06/19/2022 12:01 pm
Anyone want to explain what this "parking orbit" has to do with launching a Globalstar sat?  ::)
Looks like the mission profile could be:

1. Direct injection into a 533 x 533km orbit (1:34:51 period)
2. Release payload 'X'
3. SES2 to raise apogee to a 533 x 1200km (ΔV about 174 m/s)
4. SES3 to circularise at 1200 x 1200km (ΔV about 170 m/s)
5. Release Globalstar.
If the two orbits were the same inclination, then SES2 and SES3 would be equally long, but SES3 is twice the length.
The most straightforward explanation is the SES3 also includes an inclination change, in addition to circularizing. So the two orbits have slightly different inclinations.

EDIT:  SES3 was about twice as long as SES2, and should have provided twice the delta-V.  If we assume SES2 was in-plane, then SES3 provided about 340 m/s, where only 170 m/s of that was needed to circularize.  So the sideward delta-V was about sqrt(340^2-170^2), or about 290 m/s.  Orbital speed at that altitude is about 7256 m/s, so the change in inclination should be about atan(290/7256), or about 2.3 degrees.   According to Alexphysics (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=56471.msg2374667#msg2374667) the launch azimuth indicated a 54o orbit, whereas GlobalStar uses 52o.  So this is consistent with the mystery orbit being 533x533x54o.

This makes our best guess:
1. Direct injection into a 533 x 533km x 54o orbit (1:34:51 period)
2. Release payload 'X'
3. SES2 to raise apogee to a 533 x 1200km x 54o  (ΔV about 174 m/s)
4. SES3 to circularize/plane change at 1200 x 1200km x  52o (ΔV about 170 m/s for circularization, 290 m/s for plane change, 340 m/s total)
5. Release Globalstar.
6: SES4 for the second stage disposal burn.  At least 300 m/s to get to a 100 x 1200km or lower orbit.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: LouScheffer on 06/19/2022 12:37 pm
There was a 4th second stage burn for disposal, since a debris zone was specified in the Pacific.  This burn would be required, since a 1200 km circular orbit will take forever to decay naturally, much more than the 25 years that is the standard limit for space debris minimization
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 06/19/2022 12:45 pm
There was a 4th second stage burn for disposal, since a debris zone was specified in the Pacific.  This burn would be required, since a 1200 km circular orbit will take forever to decay naturally, much more than the 25 years that is the standard limit for space debris minimization

Looks like that burn, or related fuel dump, has been seen from New Zealand around 07:30 UTC: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/300617139/whats-behind-the-bizarre-lights-seen-across-new-zealands-sky (https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/300617139/whats-behind-the-bizarre-lights-seen-across-new-zealands-sky)
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: LouScheffer on 06/19/2022 12:58 pm
There was a 4th second stage burn for disposal, since a debris zone was specified in the Pacific.  This burn would be required, since a 1200 km circular orbit will take forever to decay naturally, much more than the 25 years that is the standard limit for space debris minimization
Looks like that burn, or related fuel dump, has been seen from New Zealand around 07:30 UTC: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/300617139/whats-behind-the-bizarre-lights-seen-across-new-zealands-sky (https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/300617139/whats-behind-the-bizarre-lights-seen-across-new-zealands-sky)
This would be the fuel dump, both by appearance and since the de-orbit burn would have happened on the other side of the Earth from the landing zone.  So the de-orbit burn was roughly over Europe, then the fuel dump on the way down over New Zealand, then disposal in the Pacific on a northwest trajectory.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: JayWee on 06/19/2022 01:15 pm
Why do you dump the fuel when the stage is doomed anyway? Btw, looking at the picture - any guesstimate how much fuel is that?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Herb Schaltegger on 06/19/2022 01:50 pm
Why do you dump the fuel when the stage is doomed anyway? Btw, looking at the picture - any guesstimate how much fuel is that?

Common (and best) practice is to passivate the stage - venting down residual propellants ensures no pressure stabilization can occur during entry. Pressure stabilization can change the survivability probabilities and larger tank structures might survive deeper into the atmosphere and thus change the debris impact zone predictions. In addition, with no or minimal LOX and RP1 left in the stage, there will be no chance of energetic, potentially propulsive combustion during entry/breakup which might also affect the entry impact predictions. Typically you also want to de-energize any batteries, vent down COPVs, and discharge any capacitors.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: daveglo on 06/19/2022 02:10 pm
Anyone want to explain what this "parking orbit" has to do with launching a Globalstar sat?  ::)
Looks like the mission profile could be:

1. Direct injection into a 533 x 533km orbit (1:34:51 period)
2. Release payload 'X'
3. SES2 to raise apogee to a 533 x 1200km (ΔV about 174 m/s)
4. SES3 to circularise at 1200 x 1200km (ΔV about 170 m/s)
5. Release Globalstar.
If the two orbits were the same inclination, then SES2 and SES3 would be equally long, but SES3 is twice the length.
The most straightforward explanation is the SES3 also includes an inclination change, in addition to circularizing. So the two orbits have slightly different inclinations.

EDIT:  SES3 was about twice as long as SES2, and should have provided twice the delta-V.  If we assume SES2 was in-plane, then SES3 provided about 340 m/s, where only 170 m/s of that was needed to circularize.  So the sideward delta-V was about sqrt(340^2-170^2), or about 290 m/s.  Orbital speed at that altitude is about 7256 m/s, so the change in inclination should be about atan(290/7256), or about 2.3 degrees.   According to Alexphysics (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=56471.msg2374667#msg2374667) the launch azimuth indicated a 54o orbit, whereas GlobalStar uses 52o.  So this is consistent with the mystery orbit being 533x533x54o.

This makes our best guess:
1. Direct injection into a 533 x 533km x 54o orbit (1:34:51 period)
2. Release payload 'X'
3. SES2 to raise apogee to a 533 x 1200km x 54o  (ΔV about 174 m/s)
4. SES3 to circularize/plane change at 1200 x 1200km x  52o (ΔV about 170 m/s for circularization, 290 m/s for plane change, 340 m/s total)
5. Release Globalstar.
6: SES4 for the second stage disposal burn.  At least 300 m/s to get to a 100 x 1200km or lower orbit.

This might explain why, when I saw the SES-3 burn earlier today, the direction of the burn was at an approximate 30-45 degree angle to the flight path.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Zed_Noir on 06/19/2022 02:16 pm
So what previous DoD/NRO missions utilized the 530km x 530 km x 52 degrees orbit?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 06/19/2022 02:44 pm
https://twitter.com/waynehale/status/1538525140824346625

Quote
A remarkable achievement by #SpaceX   Truly seems like we are on the way to ‘airliner like operations’ for spaceflight.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 06/19/2022 02:50 pm
https://twitter.com/johnkrausphotos/status/1538516888392814593

Quote
Falcon 9 heads to orbit with Globalstar FM15 early this morning, capping off an impressive sprint of three launches in about 36 hours with SpaceX launching two missions from Florida and one from California.

See more of my newest photos → johnkrausphotos.com/New
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Mariusuiram on 06/19/2022 03:08 pm
Maybe everyone is overthinking the info available?

The Globalstar quote above referencing launching the spare also says current and future subscribers “and other customers”

What if DOD / SDA or similar wants to test using commercial sat comms and is paying to launch this spare.

They would be the customer making it secretive and also paying for a direct insertion.

So there is a government client but it’s a commercial spare payload.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rekt1971 on 06/19/2022 03:20 pm
Maybe everyone is overthinking the info available?

The Globalstar quote above referencing launching the spare also says current and future subscribers “and other customers”

What if DOD / SDA or similar wants to test using commercial sat comms and is paying to launch this spare.

They would be the customer making it secretive and also paying for a direct insertion.

So there is a government client but it’s a commercial spare payload.

It's possible, but wouldn't really explain three 2nd stage burns.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: gongora on 06/19/2022 03:20 pm
Maybe everyone is overthinking the info available?
The Globalstar quote above referencing launching the spare also says current and future subscribers “and other customers”
What if DOD / SDA or similar wants to test using commercial sat comms and is paying to launch this spare.
They would be the customer making it secretive and also paying for a direct insertion.
So there is a government client but it’s a commercial spare payload.

Why would DoD/SDA pay for a launch of one spare satellite for an already operational constellation, one of many existing constellations, for "testing"?  That's an awfully expensive test of an existing capability.  Also it wasn't a direct insertion.  It stopped at another orbit on the way.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Comga on 06/19/2022 03:21 pm
Anyone want to explain what this "parking orbit" has to do with launching a Globalstar sat?  ::)
Looks like the mission profile could be:

1. Direct injection into a 533 x 533km orbit (1:34:51 period)
2. Release payload 'X'
3. SES2 to raise apogee to a 533 x 1200km (ΔV about 174 m/s)
4. SES3 to circularise at 1200 x 1200km (ΔV about 170 m/s)
5. Release Globalstar.
If the two orbits were the same inclination, then SES2 and SES3 would be equally long, but SES3 is twice the length.
The most straightforward explanation is the SES3 also includes an inclination change, in addition to circularizing. So the two orbits have slightly different inclinations.

EDIT:  SES3 was about twice as long as SES2, and should have provided twice the delta-V.  If we assume SES2 was in-plane, then SES3 provided about 340 m/s, where only 170 m/s of that was needed to circularize.  So the sideward delta-V was about sqrt(340^2-170^2), or about 290 m/s.  Orbital speed at that altitude is about 7256 m/s, so the change in inclination should be about atan(290/7256), or about 2.3 degrees.   According to Alexphysics (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=56471.msg2374667#msg2374667) the launch azimuth indicated a 54o orbit, whereas GlobalStar uses 52o.  So this is consistent with the mystery orbit being 533x533x54o.

This makes our best guess:
1. Direct injection into a 533 x 533km x 54o orbit (1:34:51 period)
2. Release payload 'X'
3. SES2 to raise apogee to a 533 x 1200km x 54o  (ΔV about 174 m/s)
4. SES3 to circularize/plane change at 1200 x 1200km x  52o (ΔV about 170 m/s for circularization, 290 m/s for plane change, 340 m/s total)
5. Release Globalstar.
6: SES4 for the second stage disposal burn.  At least 300 m/s to get to a 100 x 1200km or lower orbit.

This might explain why, when I saw the SES-3 burn earlier today, the direction of the burn was at an approximate 30-45 degree angle to the flight path.

(My bolding above)
290 m/s “sideways” vs 190 m/s prograde is very close to a 60 degree angle to the flight path.
Are there effects that would cause it to appear to be “an appropriately 30-45 degree angle to the flight path”?

Also, if these suppositions are correct, wouldn’t the constrain pretty tightly the drop-off orbit for our mystery payload(s)?
After all that secrecy….
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: TimTri on 06/19/2022 03:33 pm
This user filmed the 3rd S2 burn from multiple angles.

https://youtu.be/Xu8_a8eoFWc

He confirmed to me in the comments that an object on the exact same trajectory was visible a few minutes earlier, which could be our mystery payload. It also appeared to be venting (maybe an early propulsion test of some sort?).

I also had a look at the trajectory over Europe after SECO-1 (around the time the secret payload might have been deployed). Seems to be almost identical to an ordinary Starlink launch, except with a circular orbit already nearly at operational height (about 540km).
Starlink-3287 flew over Europe in the exact same trajectory with an almost identical orbit at the exact same time (verified on Heavens Above and CelesTrak). Maybe this could help us develop rough viewing opportunities for the secret payload. Other nearby sats include Starlink-1183 (1-2 minutes later) and Starlink-2446 (2-3 minutes earlier).

Edit: Here‘s the mystery object a few minutes prior to the Stage 2 flyover.
https://youtu.be/FefBDxCH1Kk
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Paul_G on 06/19/2022 03:36 pm
Maybe everyone is overthinking the info available?

The Globalstar quote above referencing launching the spare also says current and future subscribers “and other customers”

What if DOD / SDA or similar wants to test using commercial sat comms and is paying to launch this spare.

They would be the customer making it secretive and also paying for a direct insertion.

So there is a government client but it’s a commercial spare payload.

In a previous post (link below), the structure that we can see at the top of the stack is similar, but not identical to the structure we saw in Transporter-2, which had some Starlinks on it that can be seen deploying at the T+1:28:53 mark (https://youtu.be/sSiuW1HcGjA?t=6228) - this implies that *something* was up on this structure, and deployed before the Globalstar payload. But the Starlinks that are being deployed now need the stage to be spun in order to deploy - is it feasible that if there were some kind of Starlink says on this mission that the stage could be spun up to deploy them, then spun down to allow for the 3rd firing of the 2nd stage to get Globalstar to where it needs to be., or could a revised deployment procedure be used?

Some have suggested that SpaceX could be testing their Starship heat tiles on re-entry - wouldn’’t this need some kind of NOTAM like we see for Stage 2 disposal?

It seems that something was up on top of the stage, and deployed prior to SECO-2, as shortly after SECO-2, we did get a view of the now empty support structure on top of the stack.

Looks like the same deployer for Starlink on the Transporter missions
https://twitter.com/GewoonLukas_/status/1538395956848349185
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: gongora on 06/19/2022 04:01 pm
Everyone keeps mentioning the deployment structure at the top of the T2 stack.  It was also on the T3 stack, the flight that had four payloads show up later.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: JayWee on 06/19/2022 04:05 pm
I also had a look at the trajectory over Europe after SECO-1 (around the time the secret payload might have been deployed). Seems to be almost identical to an ordinary Starlink launch, except with a circular orbit already nearly at operational height (about 540km).
Starlink-3287 flew over Europe in the exact same trajectory with an almost identical orbit at the exact same time (verified on Heavens Above and CelesTrak). Maybe this could help us develop rough viewing opportunities for the secret payload. Other nearby sats include Starlink-1183 (1-2 minutes later) and Starlink-2446 (2-3 minutes earlier).

If you wanted to hide secret megaconstellation, mixing it with Starlink would be a perfect way to do it. Also would expain the secrecy - you don't want to let people know that there are military/intelligence assets snucked into a commercial constellation...
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Skyrocket on 06/19/2022 04:07 pm
Everyone keeps mentioning the deployment structure at the top of the T2 stack.  It was also on the T3 stack, the flight that had four payloads show up later.
This is interesting - i had not noticed that before.
There appear to be Starlink-shaped satellites on top of the structure.
This might have interesting implications, what USA 320, ..., 323 might be.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: gongora on 06/19/2022 04:12 pm
In a previous post (link below), the structure that we can see at the top of the stack is similar, but not identical to the structure we saw in Transporter-2, which had some Starlinks on it that can be seen deploying at the T+1:28:53 mark - this implies that *something* was up on this structure, and deployed before the Globalstar payload. But the Starlinks that are being deployed now need the stage to be spun in order to deploy - is it feasible that if there were some kind of Starlink says on this mission that the stage could be spun up to deploy them, then spun down to allow for the 3rd firing of the 2nd stage to get Globalstar to where it needs to be

It's certainly feasible to spin up and spin down the stage for a deployment, but was the stage spinning in the T2 Starlink deployment you linked?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Paul_G on 06/19/2022 04:19 pm

It's certainly feasible to spin up and spin down the stage for a deployment, but was the stage spinning in the T2 Starlink deployment you linked?

Yes, the video shows the stage was spun up to deploy the Starlinks.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: LouScheffer on 06/19/2022 04:28 pm
Looks like the mission profile could be:

1. Direct injection into a 533 x 533km orbit (1:34:51 period)
2. Release payload 'X'
3. SES2 to raise apogee to a 533 x 1200km (ΔV about 174 m/s)
4. SES3 to circularise at 1200 x 1200km (ΔV about 170 m/s)
5. Release Globalstar.
If the two orbits were the same inclination, then SES2 and SES3 would be equally long, but SES3 is twice the length.
The most straightforward explanation is the SES3 also includes an inclination change, in addition to circularizing. So the two orbits have slightly different inclinations.

EDIT:  SES3 was about twice as long as SES2, and should have provided twice the delta-V.  If we assume SES2 was in-plane, then SES3 provided about 340 m/s, where only 170 m/s of that was needed to circularize.  So the sideward delta-V was about sqrt(340^2-170^2), or about 290 m/s.  Orbital speed at that altitude is about 7256 m/s, so the change in inclination should be about atan(290/7256), or about 2.3 degrees.   According to Alexphysics (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=56471.msg2374667#msg2374667) the launch azimuth indicated a 54o orbit, whereas GlobalStar uses 52o.  So this is consistent with the mystery orbit being 533x533x54o.

This makes our best guess:
1. Direct injection into a 533 x 533km x 54o orbit (1:34:51 period)
2. Release payload 'X'
3. SES2 to raise apogee to a 533 x 1200km x 54o  (ΔV about 174 m/s)
4. SES3 to circularize/plane change at 1200 x 1200km x  52o (ΔV about 170 m/s for circularization, 290 m/s for plane change, 340 m/s total)
5. Release Globalstar.
6: SES4 for the second stage disposal burn.  At least 300 m/s to get to a 100 x 1200km or lower orbit.
This might explain why, when I saw the SES-3 burn earlier today, the direction of the burn was at an approximate 30-45 degree angle to the flight path.
(My bolding above)
290 m/s “sideways” vs 190 m/s prograde is very close to a 60 degree angle to the flight path.
Are there effects that would cause it to appear to be “an appropriately 30-45 degree angle to the flight path”?

Also, if these suppositions are correct, wouldn’t the constrain pretty tightly the drop-off orbit for our mystery payload(s)?
After all that secrecy….
From the video just below your post, the angles look consistent with a 60 degree angle.  If it was purely circularization, it would be in line with the flight path.  If it was purely plane change, it would be at right angles.  It looks to me as closer to a right angle than straight ahead, so 60 degrees seems plausible.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: TimTri on 06/19/2022 05:11 pm
Everyone keeps mentioning the deployment structure at the top of the T2 stack.  It was also on the T3 stack, the flight that had four payloads show up later.

You might be onto something here. The grid-shaped structure looks basically identical to the one seen on the Globalstar launch, and there are clearly some Starlink satellites on top of it. The deployment isn‘t shown. And I don‘t know if they ever acknowledged the existence of Starlink satellites on that launch. These USA 320 etc. sats are in 540km orbits, similar to the one our secret payload was deployed in.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: jcm on 06/19/2022 06:06 pm
Looks like the mission profile could be:

1. Direct injection into a 533 x 533km orbit (1:34:51 period)
2. Release payload 'X'
3. SES2 to raise apogee to a 533 x 1200km (ΔV about 174 m/s)
4. SES3 to circularise at 1200 x 1200km (ΔV about 170 m/s)
5. Release Globalstar.
If the two orbits were the same inclination, then SES2 and SES3 would be equally long, but SES3 is twice the length.
The most straightforward explanation is the SES3 also includes an inclination change, in addition to circularizing. So the two orbits have slightly different inclinations.

EDIT:  SES3 was about twice as long as SES2, and should have provided twice the delta-V.  If we assume SES2 was in-plane, then SES3 provided about 340 m/s, where only 170 m/s of that was needed to circularize.  So the sideward delta-V was about sqrt(340^2-170^2), or about 290 m/s.  Orbital speed at that altitude is about 7256 m/s, so the change in inclination should be about atan(290/7256), or about 2.3 degrees.   According to Alexphysics (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=56471.msg2374667#msg2374667) the launch azimuth indicated a 54o orbit, whereas GlobalStar uses 52o.  So this is consistent with the mystery orbit being 533x533x54o.

This makes our best guess:
1. Direct injection into a 533 x 533km x 54o orbit (1:34:51 period)
2. Release payload 'X'
3. SES2 to raise apogee to a 533 x 1200km x 54o  (ΔV about 174 m/s)
4. SES3 to circularize/plane change at 1200 x 1200km x  52o (ΔV about 170 m/s for circularization, 290 m/s for plane change, 340 m/s total)
5. Release Globalstar.
6: SES4 for the second stage disposal burn.  At least 300 m/s to get to a 100 x 1200km or lower orbit.
This might explain why, when I saw the SES-3 burn earlier today, the direction of the burn was at an approximate 30-45 degree angle to the flight path.
(My bolding above)
290 m/s “sideways” vs 190 m/s prograde is very close to a 60 degree angle to the flight path.
Are there effects that would cause it to appear to be “an appropriately 30-45 degree angle to the flight path”?

Also, if these suppositions are correct, wouldn’t the constrain pretty tightly the drop-off orbit for our mystery payload(s)?
After all that secrecy….



This is interesting but I really wish people would do some error estimates.
What is the uncertainty on the "54 degrees" measured from the launch info?  Plus or minus 0.1 deg? or plus or minus 1 deg? or what?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: meekGee on 06/19/2022 06:11 pm
If there is a second payload they really don't want to talk about it.
Hence SpaceX have their smoothest talking announcer continuously talking to distract viewers from the abnormalities of this launch. Jessie Anderson has been MIA from launch webcast lately.   
Are you saying she's on board this mission?  Indeed they have suspiciously removed evidence that may be used to disprove this hypothesis!

EDIT:  oh wait I read your comment wrong, now saw a screenshot.  Ok so she's not aboard.  Which hints that maybe it's the other commentator that is on board?

Inquiring minds want to know - who is stowing away on this mission?

(Sorry, some of the previous ideas were pretty conspiratorial)
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Bean Kenobi on 06/19/2022 07:05 pm
Since Transporter 3 was a RTLS mission, it appears the TTL sats didn't impose the ASDS landing of the Globalstar mission, only Globalstar sat release at 1,200 km required it.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: winkhomewinkhome on 06/19/2022 07:15 pm
Starlink 2.0
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: DistantTemple on 06/19/2022 07:56 pm
If SX make a habit of adding their own (test or operational) "Starlink Vx.y" silently onto other launches, they could test their military options, other technologies they are developing, and provide a background where real secret satellites would be indistinguishable from such experiments. SpaceX is so flexible, innovative, and launces so frequently, that adding secret sats at late notice would be an outstanding service to offer the DOD etc. The ability to hide them within a Starlink orbit is brilliant. Since "all" satellites have TLE's, and get observed, any such would have to masquerade as an SX sat.   Just guessing....
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Lars-J on 06/19/2022 09:24 pm
Starlink 2.0
Doubtful, why would they keep that secret?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Orbiter on 06/19/2022 10:11 pm
Starlink 2.0

From what Elon has provided us, Starlink 2.0 is too large to fit into a F9 fairing.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: su27k on 06/20/2022 12:59 am
Just for the sake of argument...

From what Elon has provided us, Starlink 2.0 is too large to fit into a F9 fairing.

Not too long ago they told FCC they have the option to launch Starlink Gen2 on Falcon 9. So either they have two Gen2 designs, one for F9, one for Starship; or it's modular and can be enlarged for Starship. Either way, it's possible they have the hardware for a Gen2 that fits on F9 and wants to test it first instead of waiting for Starship. Given Starship OFT is delayed for several months, it sort of makes sense.

Doubtful, why would they keep that secret?

To keep competitors off balance, cause them to misjudge progress of Gen2. Currently everybody is assuming first Gen2 will fly with Starship, if they have secretly flew that on Transporter 3 as USA 320 to 323, and again on this flight, it has progressed much further than people assumed.

Let's not forget SpaceX hasn't always been open with Starlink, most obvious example is they kept the # of satellites on F9 secret until a few days before first launch, 60 per launch is a big surprise to almost everyone since most people assumed it's would be around 30. They also didn't show the deployment mechanism for a quite a while. And they kept the size and weight of Gen 2 secret until Elon spilled the beans to Everyday Astronaut a few weeks ago.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Skyrocket on 06/20/2022 01:05 am
Everyone keeps mentioning the deployment structure at the top of the T2 stack.  It was also on the T3 stack, the flight that had four payloads show up later.

You might be onto something here. The grid-shaped structure looks basically identical to the one seen on the Globalstar launch, and there are clearly some Starlink satellites on top of it. The deployment isn‘t shown. And I don‘t know if they ever acknowledged the existence of Starlink satellites on that launch. These USA 320 etc. sats are in 540km orbits, similar to the one our secret payload was deployed in.

The more simple explanation would be that Starlink-1.5 busses are offered to host other non-Starlink payloads. USA-320 to -323 might be an example. So might be this recent launch
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Asteroza on 06/20/2022 01:08 am
Everyone keeps mentioning the deployment structure at the top of the T2 stack.  It was also on the T3 stack, the flight that had four payloads show up later.

You might be onto something here. The grid-shaped structure looks basically identical to the one seen on the Globalstar launch, and there are clearly some Starlink satellites on top of it. The deployment isn‘t shown. And I don‘t know if they ever acknowledged the existence of Starlink satellites on that launch. These USA 320 etc. sats are in 540km orbits, similar to the one our secret payload was deployed in.

The more simple explanation would be that Starlink-1.5 busses are offered to host other non-Starlink payloads. USA-320 to -323 might be an example. So might be this recent launch

Though not likely SDA constellation or Project Blackjack related?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: alugobi on 06/20/2022 01:16 am
Keep competitors off balance why?  None of them are close to matching SX production, launch, and/or network performance.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Alexphysics on 06/20/2022 01:20 am
The theory that they're some sort of prototype Starlink 2.0 satellites that they're launching without anyone knowing falls itself apart when you consider the fact that they'd have to be approved by the FCC. If there were any Starlinks in this flight of any kind they would have to be of the older generation and/or be for a government agency which wouldn't necessarily need FCC approval. That or whoever proposes that theory has to include SpaceX comitting an illegal action that could entail the removal of their rights to operate the Starlink constellation.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/20/2022 01:23 am
Beautiful @SpaceX launch with secret payload Globestar-2..

https://twitter.com/AGPfoto/status/1538554421830946816
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: su27k on 06/20/2022 01:31 am
The theory that they're some sort of prototype Starlink 2.0 satellites that they're launching without anyone knowing falls itself apart when you consider the fact that they'd have to be approved by the FCC. If there were any Starlinks in this flight of any kind they would have to be of the older generation and/or be for a government agency which wouldn't necessarily need FCC approval. That or whoever proposes that theory has to include SpaceX comitting an illegal action that could entail the removal of their rights to operate the Starlink constellation.

Not necessarily, SpaceX didn't file anything when they started flying v1.5, what can be flown under their existing Gen1 license is not clearly defined. Should be obvious that if they did fly Gen2 prototype, it'll still be using the same spectrum as Gen1, this would eliminate most of the concerns from FCC. The altitude and inclination of USA 320 is pretty close to one of the Gen1 orbits as well (97.5 degrees vs 97.6 degrees, 540km vs 560km)

Or they could sidestep FCC by asking their DoD customer such as SDA to classify the launch as part of the DoD program. For example it's quite possible that they're using Starlink v2 bus for their SDA missile warning satellites, so they could ask SDA to authorize a test launch or two of this bus as part of the SDA constellation program. This way SDA gets the peace of mind that their missile warning satellite would actually work once launched, and SpaceX gets to test Starlink v2 bus early, win-win.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: TimTri on 06/20/2022 01:41 am
Via Marco Langbroek on SeeSat-L: Very rough TLE of our unidentified payload!

UNKNOWN            covert launch with Globalstar FM15 on 19 June 2022
1 70001U 22999A   22170.18541667  .00000000  00000-0  00000-0 0    02
2 70001 052.0000 230.1696 0001447 047.8547 325.7015 15.10393460    00

I wouldn’t expect many orbital changes since the object is already at operational altitude (assuming it’s the same type of secret Starlink launched on Transporter-3).

Does someone know how to put this into a 3D globe visualization and/or calculate viewing opportunities for Central Europe? Haven’t really worked with TLEs before.

I did remember the ordinary Starlink satellite with an almost identical orbit to our secret payload I mentioned earlier and went out to watch it at about 2AM. I noticed a bright object on a plausible trajectory shortly afterwards which was not present in any of my records. Could this have been our secret sat? Hopefully just a matter of time until we get some good observations and a precise TLE.
Title: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Lars-J on 06/20/2022 01:59 am
Please stop it with the dumb Starlink 2.0 speculation… It makes no sense. Full stop. Nothing about Starlink development and early test launches has EVER been a secret.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: SPKirsch on 06/20/2022 02:17 am
https://twitter.com/ncspaceops/status/1538383728560558081
Quote
We spotted @SpaceX Falcon9 B1061 coming back to earth for a drone ship landing off the #NC coast after lofting Globalstar-2 FM-15 to orbit #SpaceX #sobx #obx #NorthCarolina
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: OneSpeed on 06/20/2022 05:18 am
Here is a comparison of the booster webcast telemetry from GlobalStar-FM15 and Starlink-4-19.

1. These profiles are about as different as ASDS booster trajectories can get. Starlink missions are high payload mass, with moderate loft. GlobalStar-FM15 had a low payload mass, and very high loft.

2. You can see that GlobalStar reached its throttle bucket much earlier, but had lower acceleration from that point on because it was maintaining a higher flight path angle (FPA).

3. The higher FPA led to a much higher apogee, and increased downrange distance before alighting on the ASDS.

I have also included the GlobalStar second stage telemetry, with interpolated values for when there was loss of signal.

1. This mission could have been achieved with two burns, to 167 x 1125km and then circularise to 1125 x 1125km, or perhaps even one second stage burn directly to 1125 x 1125km.

2. The fact that there were three burns, and the first was directly to about 535 x 535km confirms that this was the destination for the mystery payload(s).
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/20/2022 09:58 am
CelesTrak has a TLE for 1 object from the launch (2022-064) of GLOBALSTAR FM15 atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral on Jun 19 at 0427 UTC:

https://twitter.com/TSKelso/status/1538773049553526786
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/20/2022 10:20 am
TLE now out for Globalstar, in a 1111 x 1125 km x 52.0 deg orbit; 2022-064A, catalog 52888..

https://twitter.com/planet4589/status/1538766911365849090
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: LouScheffer on 06/20/2022 01:47 pm
This is interesting but I really wish people would do some error estimates.
What is the uncertainty on the "54 degrees" measured from the launch info?  Plus or minus 0.1 deg? or plus or minus 1 deg? or what?

A reasonable request, but tough.  For practice, I tried to guess the inclination of a GPS launch from the barge position.  In this case we know the real answer, so we can check.

From  the FCC notice (https://fcc.report/ELS/Space-Exploration-Technologies-Corp-SpaceX/0662-EX-ST-2021), the locations are:
Cape 28 29 11N, 80 32 51W
ASDS 32 49 43N, 75 59  8W

Using the spherical geometry website: https://www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html
We find the initial bearing is 40.95 from North and hence 49.05 from equator

Assuming an instantaneous dV, and an orbit of 533 km (7598 m/s), we find the components in the launch frame:
X = 7598 * cos(49.05 degrees) = 4980 m/s
Y = 7598 * sin(49.05 degrees) = 5739 m/s

Next, we need to correct for Earth rotation, which will add to the X component, giving
X = 4980 + 40000000/(24*3600)*cos(28.5 degrees) = 5387 m/s

Then we re-find the azimuth
atan(5739/5387) = 46.81 degrees from equator and hence azimuth = 43.19

Next, an orbit's azimuth depends on its latitude.  The usual equation is:
azimuth = asin(cos(inc)/cos(lat))

We instead solve for inclination:
sin(azimuth) = cos(inc)/cos(lat))
cos(inc) = sin(azimuth)*cos(lat)
inc = acos(sin(azimuth)*cos(lat))

So we get:
inc = acos(sin(43.19 degrees)*cos(28.5 degrees)) = 53.02 degrees

But this GPS launch was known to be 55.0 degrees.  So we seem to be about 2 degrees off.  Either I made a mistake (entirely possible) or perhaps the extended nature of the launch maneuver causes the difference.

Probably more accurate is differential, which is what I think the original poster did, comparing it to previous launches, their barge location, and their inclination.   If you go through the same exercise with the GlobalStar launch (see below), you get about 0.16 degrees less inclination.  This makes sense since the landing locations were very similar.  This would say the mystery orbit inclination would be about 54.84 degrees.  But the error margin is hard to say.

Second stage burns are even guess-ier.  The duration is hard to estimate from the camera, the startup and shutdown transients are a big part of the dV, and we don't know what throttle settings are used.

---- Same calcs for GlobalStar:

Step 1 : get long, lat of ASDS and Cape from notice
https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/STA_Print.cfm?mode=current&application_seq=115185&RequestTimeout=100Connection
   Cape: 28 29 11N, 80 32 51W
  ASDS: 32 52 26N, 75 53 58W

Step 2 : find bearing, get 41.16 from north = 48.84 from equator

Step 3 : Consider launch as a single impulse.  V for a 533 km orbit is 7598

Step 4: Find components
X = 7598 * cos(48.84) = 5001
Y = 7598 * sin(48.84) = 5720

Step 5: Add Earth rotation:
X = 5001 + 40000000/(24*3600)*cos(28.5) = 5408
Inertial inclination = atan(5720/5408) = 46.61 degrees; azimuth=43.39

Step 6: Convert azimuth at a latitude to inclination
azimuth = asin(cos(inc)/cos(lat))
sin(azimuth) = cos(inc)/cos(lat))
cos(inc) = sin(azimuth)*cos(lat)
inc = acos(sin(azimuth)*cos(lat))
inc = acos(sin(43.39 degrees)*cos(28.5 degrees)) = 52.86 degrees

Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: SPKirsch on 06/20/2022 04:30 pm
Cross-post:
https://twitter.com/julia_bergeron/status/1538863103701569536
Quote
Current recovery positions: Doug with fairings and B1060 on ASOG (Starlink), Finn with JRTI and B1061 (Globalstar-2) and Bob steaming along with fairings.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: jcm on 06/20/2022 04:34 pm
This is interesting but I really wish people would do some error estimates.
What is the uncertainty on the "54 degrees" measured from the launch info?  Plus or minus 0.1 deg? or plus or minus 1 deg? or what?

A reasonable request, but tough.  For practice, I tried to guess the inclination of a GPS launch from the barge position.  In this case we know the real answer, so we can check.

From  the FCC notice (https://fcc.report/ELS/Space-Exploration-Technologies-Corp-SpaceX/0662-EX-ST-2021), the locations are:
Cape 28 29 11N, 80 32 51W
ASDS 32 49 43N, 75 59  8W

Using the spherical geometry website: https://www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html
We find the initial bearing is 40.95 from North and hence 49.05 from equator

Assuming an instantaneous dV, and an orbit of 533 km (7598 m/s), we find the components in the launch frame:
X = 7598 * cos(49.05 degrees) = 4980 m/s
Y = 7598 * sin(49.05 degrees) = 5739 m/s

Next, we need to correct for Earth rotation, which will add to the X component, giving
X = 4980 + 40000000/(24*3600)*cos(28.5 degrees) = 5387 m/s

Then we re-find the azimuth
atan(5739/5387) = 46.81 degrees from equator and hence azimuth = 43.19

Next, an orbit's azimuth depends on its latitude.  The usual equation is:
azimuth = asin(cos(inc)/cos(lat))

We instead solve for inclination:
sin(azimuth) = cos(inc)/cos(lat))
cos(inc) = sin(azimuth)*cos(lat)
inc = acos(sin(azimuth)*cos(lat))

So we get:
inc = acos(sin(43.19 degrees)*cos(28.5 degrees)) = 53.02 degrees

But this GPS launch was known to be 55.0 degrees.  So we seem to be about 2 degrees off.  Either I made a mistake (entirely possible) or perhaps the extended nature of the launch maneuver causes the difference.

Probably more accurate is differential, which is what I think the original poster did, comparing it to previous launches, their barge location, and their inclination.   If you go through the same exercise with the GlobalStar launch (see below), you get about 0.16 degrees less inclination.  This makes sense since the landing locations were very similar.  This would say the mystery orbit inclination would be about 54.84 degrees.  But the error margin is hard to say.

Second stage burns are even guess-ier.  The duration is hard to estimate from the camera, the startup and shutdown transients are a big part of the dV, and we don't know what throttle settings are used.

---- Same calcs for GlobalStar:

Step 1 : get long, lat of ASDS and Cape from notice
https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/STA_Print.cfm?mode=current&application_seq=115185&RequestTimeout=100Connection
   Cape: 28 29 11N, 80 32 51W
  ASDS: 32 52 26N, 75 53 58W

Step 2 : find bearing, get 41.16 from north = 48.84 from equator

Step 3 : Consider launch as a single impulse.  V for a 533 km orbit is 7598

Step 4: Find components
X = 7598 * cos(48.84) = 5001
Y = 7598 * sin(48.84) = 5720

Step 5: Add Earth rotation:
X = 5001 + 40000000/(24*3600)*cos(28.5) = 5408
Inertial inclination = atan(5720/5408) = 46.61 degrees; azimuth=43.39

Step 6: Convert azimuth at a latitude to inclination
azimuth = asin(cos(inc)/cos(lat))
sin(azimuth) = cos(inc)/cos(lat))
cos(inc) = sin(azimuth)*cos(lat)
inc = acos(sin(azimuth)*cos(lat))
inc = acos(sin(43.39 degrees)*cos(28.5 degrees)) = 52.86 degrees



Well, we can simplify the request to 'what is the uncertainty on the launch azimuth'.   The FCC position is given to 1" of lat/lon corresponding
to 31 metres, but I am skeptical the droneship is held to that degree of accuracy. Let's say it's good to 100m. Taking that and 655 km from the pad gives 0.01 degree uncertainty on the azimuth, which is pretty good.  But it's clear (e.g. from Raul's LHA maps) that there
was something of a dogleg, and that introduces a larger uncertainty.  Usuing the droneship hazard area only, we can get perhaps about a 0.1 degree confidence on its alignment, giving an uncertainty in the intended trajectory. I'm not sure though what the
added uncertainty is for slop from intended to actual. It does look a lot better determined than I would have guessed before doing the math.
gives
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Alexphysics on 06/20/2022 04:41 pm
The theory that they're some sort of prototype Starlink 2.0 satellites that they're launching without anyone knowing falls itself apart when you consider the fact that they'd have to be approved by the FCC. If there were any Starlinks in this flight of any kind they would have to be of the older generation and/or be for a government agency which wouldn't necessarily need FCC approval. That or whoever proposes that theory has to include SpaceX comitting an illegal action that could entail the removal of their rights to operate the Starlink constellation.

Not necessarily, SpaceX didn't file anything when they started flying v1.5, what can be flown under their existing Gen1 license is not clearly defined. Should be obvious that if they did fly Gen2 prototype, it'll still be using the same spectrum as Gen1, this would eliminate most of the concerns from FCC. The altitude and inclination of USA 320 is pretty close to one of the Gen1 orbits as well (97.5 degrees vs 97.6 degrees, 540km vs 560km)

Or they could sidestep FCC by asking their DoD customer such as SDA to classify the launch as part of the DoD program. For example it's quite possible that they're using Starlink v2 bus for their SDA missile warning satellites, so they could ask SDA to authorize a test launch or two of this bus as part of the SDA constellation program. This way SDA gets the peace of mind that their missile warning satellite would actually work once launched, and SpaceX gets to test Starlink v2 bus early, win-win.

SpaceX did file an updated constellation planning to add v1.5 satellites and needed special permission to launch the laser link satellites on Transporter-1 for the polar shells.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Barley on 06/20/2022 05:42 pm
Well, we can simplify the request to 'what is the uncertainty on the launch azimuth'.   The FCC position is given to 1" of lat/lon corresponding
to 31 metres, but I am skeptical the droneship is held to that degree of accuracy. Let's say it's good to 100m. Taking that and 655 km from the pad gives 0.01 degree uncertainty on the azimuth, which is pretty good.  But it's clear (e.g. from Raul's LHA maps) that there
was something of a dogleg, and that introduces a larger uncertainty.  Usuing the droneship hazard area only, we can get perhaps about a 0.1 degree confidence on its alignment, giving an uncertainty in the intended trajectory. I'm not sure though what the
added uncertainty is for slop from intended to actual. It does look a lot better determined than I would have guessed before doing the math.
gives
The great circle calculation makes the assumption that the drone ship is directly under the launch trajectory. 

A landing booster has down range and cross range capability.  The extreme is a RTLS, but for anything but a completely maxed out launch there is some.  The cosine losses of a dogleg during the reentry burn moving the landing point on the order of 10km would be quite small.  For lighter launches (but still too heavy for RTLS) hundreds of km of cross range could be possible.

As you hint there may choose a dogleg. Non-orbital mechanic reason to move the drone ship could include avoiding shipping or air lanes, strong currents such as the gulf stream, a jet stream or other weather.  Or they might not bother to optimize the landing position to six decimal places because it really doesn't matter.

Add: Also they might be trolling.  The offer price for twitter shows us that Mr. Musk is not averse to encoding messages in less significant digits.  Digits that had far more value than minutes of latitude. ;)
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: JayWee on 06/20/2022 07:01 pm
https://twitter.com/planet4589/status/1538960051414646796

Quote
Space-Track confirms the presence of four secret payloads on the Globalstar Falcon 9 launch  - USA 328 to USA 331, catalog 52889 to 52892, orbital data not available. One piece of debris, probably a Starlink-style tension rod?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: TimTri on 06/20/2022 08:14 pm
https://twitter.com/planet4589/status/1538960051414646796

Quote
Space-Track confirms the presence of four secret payloads on the Globalstar Falcon 9 launch  - USA 328 to USA 331, catalog 52889 to 52892, orbital data not available. One piece of debris, probably a Starlink-style tension rod?

Here we go! Seems like they did end up flying the same amount of secret Starlink satellites they already sent up on Transporter-3. Let’s hope we get some TLEs soon!
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 06/20/2022 09:51 pm
From SeeSat-l (http://www.satobs.org/seesat/Jun-2022/0077.html), observation of the 3rd second stage burn:
Quote
Lick Observatory Public Programs Telescope Operator (PPTO) Keith Wandry forwarded some images of a rocket burn / fuel dump that was taken last night at Lick Observatory on 6/18/2022 at approximately 23:15 Pacific Daylight Time (6/19 06:15 UT) from near the 40" Nickel Telescope at 37.34302, -121.63717, 4200 ft MSL,  The plume is approximately Azimuth 72.9° (NE), Alt 8.1° in the constellation Pegasus.
<snip>
https://www.flickr.com/photos/xb70man/albums/72177720299927045
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: LouScheffer on 06/20/2022 10:05 pm
Well, we can simplify the request to 'what is the uncertainty on the launch azimuth'.   The FCC position is given to 1" of lat/lon corresponding
to 31 metres, but I am skeptical the droneship is held to that degree of accuracy. Let's say it's good to 100m. Taking that and 655 km from the pad gives 0.01 degree uncertainty on the azimuth, which is pretty good.  But it's clear (e.g. from Raul's LHA maps) that there
was something of a dogleg, and that introduces a larger uncertainty.  Usuing the droneship hazard area only, we can get perhaps about a 0.1 degree confidence on its alignment, giving an uncertainty in the intended trajectory. I'm not sure though what the
added uncertainty is for slop from intended to actual. It does look a lot better determined than I would have guessed before doing the math.
gives
The locations in the notices are precise, but I don't think they are very accurate.  They each state "within 40.5 nautical miles" after the coordinates.  Plus they specify the droneship, and the accompanying ship, at the same coordinates, though we know the ship stands off by about 4(?) miles during the actual landing.  So I suspect the location cannot be deduced to anywhere near 100 meters from the notice.   Internal to SpaceX, of course, the location of the droneship is VERY well known.   That's because the rocket lands on a specific GPS determined spot, and the droneship had better be there.  Since the booster almost always lands in the circle on the deck, the location must be known to a few meters, or better.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: jcm on 06/20/2022 11:01 pm
Well, we can simplify the request to 'what is the uncertainty on the launch azimuth'.   The FCC position is given to 1" of lat/lon corresponding
to 31 metres, but I am skeptical the droneship is held to that degree of accuracy. Let's say it's good to 100m. Taking that and 655 km from the pad gives 0.01 degree uncertainty on the azimuth, which is pretty good.  But it's clear (e.g. from Raul's LHA maps) that there
was something of a dogleg, and that introduces a larger uncertainty.  Usuing the droneship hazard area only, we can get perhaps about a 0.1 degree confidence on its alignment, giving an uncertainty in the intended trajectory. I'm not sure though what the
added uncertainty is for slop from intended to actual. It does look a lot better determined than I would have guessed before doing the math.
gives
The locations in the notices are precise, but I don't think they are very accurate.  They each state "within 40.5 nautical miles" after the coordinates.  Plus they specify the droneship, and the accompanying ship, at the same coordinates, though we know the ship stands off by about 4(?) miles during the actual landing.  So I suspect the location cannot be deduced to anywhere near 100 meters from the notice.   Internal to SpaceX, of course, the location of the droneship is VERY well known.   That's because the rocket lands on a specific GPS determined spot, and the droneship had better be there.  Since the booster almost always lands in the circle on the deck, the location must be known to a few meters, or better.

Yes , good point.  So a few miles - say  5km - corresponding to more like a 1 degree uncertainty. At which point the claimed change in
inclination is no longer significant.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: JohnLloydJones on 06/20/2022 11:15 pm
Well, we can simplify the request to 'what is the uncertainty on the launch azimuth'.   The FCC position is given to 1" of lat/lon corresponding
to 31 metres, but I am skeptical the droneship is held to that degree of accuracy. Let's say it's good to 100m. Taking that and 655 km from the pad gives 0.01 degree uncertainty on the azimuth, which is pretty good.  But it's clear (e.g. from Raul's LHA maps) that there
was something of a dogleg, and that introduces a larger uncertainty.  Usuing the droneship hazard area only, we can get perhaps about a 0.1 degree confidence on its alignment, giving an uncertainty in the intended trajectory. I'm not sure though what the
added uncertainty is for slop from intended to actual. It does look a lot better determined than I would have guessed before doing the math.
gives
The locations in the notices are precise, but I don't think they are very accurate.  They each state "within 40.5 nautical miles" after the coordinates.  Plus they specify the droneship, and the accompanying ship, at the same coordinates, though we know the ship stands off by about 4(?) miles during the actual landing.  So I suspect the location cannot be deduced to anywhere near 100 meters from the notice.   Internal to SpaceX, of course, the location of the droneship is VERY well known.   That's because the rocket lands on a specific GPS determined spot, and the droneship had better be there.  Since the booster almost always lands in the circle on the deck, the location must be known to a few meters, or better.
I presume that, at some point, F9 changes over from aiming at where the droneship is supposed to be to using some reference on the ship for final guidance. I have no idea how close it would have to be to switch over.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: cwr on 06/20/2022 11:31 pm
Well, we can simplify the request to 'what is the uncertainty on the launch azimuth'.   The FCC position is given to 1" of lat/lon corresponding
to 31 metres, but I am skeptical the droneship is held to that degree of accuracy. Let's say it's good to 100m. Taking that and 655 km from the pad gives 0.01 degree uncertainty on the azimuth, which is pretty good.  But it's clear (e.g. from Raul's LHA maps) that there
was something of a dogleg, and that introduces a larger uncertainty.  Usuing the droneship hazard area only, we can get perhaps about a 0.1 degree confidence on its alignment, giving an uncertainty in the intended trajectory. I'm not sure though what the
added uncertainty is for slop from intended to actual. It does look a lot better determined than I would have guessed before doing the math.
gives
The locations in the notices are precise, but I don't think they are very accurate.  They each state "within 40.5 nautical miles" after the coordinates.  Plus they specify the droneship, and the accompanying ship, at the same coordinates, though we know the ship stands off by about 4(?) miles during the actual landing.  So I suspect the location cannot be deduced to anywhere near 100 meters from the notice.   Internal to SpaceX, of course, the location of the droneship is VERY well known.   That's because the rocket lands on a specific GPS determined spot, and the droneship had better be there.  Since the booster almost always lands in the circle on the deck, the location must be known to a few meters, or better.
I presume that, at some point, F9 changes over from aiming at where the droneship is supposed to be to using some reference on the ship for final guidance. I have no idea how close it would have to be to switch over.

That is not the way it works.
LouScheffer accurately summarized the process.

Both ASDS and F9 booster endeavor to arrive at the same GPS coords at the time of landing.

For much of the entry and landing the F9 is targeting a spot displaced from those coords so
that if something goes wrong it will land in the water not on the ASDS.
If you watch the landing video from the F9 you can see it switch from that target to the agreed coords
for the ASDS.

Carl
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: OneSpeed on 06/20/2022 11:56 pm
Well, we can simplify the request to 'what is the uncertainty on the launch azimuth'.   The FCC position is given to 1" of lat/lon corresponding
to 31 metres, but I am skeptical the droneship is held to that degree of accuracy. Let's say it's good to 100m. Taking that and 655 km from the pad gives 0.01 degree uncertainty on the azimuth, which is pretty good.  But it's clear (e.g. from Raul's LHA maps) that there
was something of a dogleg, and that introduces a larger uncertainty. ...

From the Mission Control Audio, there wasn't so much a dogleg as a gradual curve to the south. This should be expected, because the ground track is part of a great circle route, which over an entire orbit is more like a distorted sinusoid.

Raul was kind enough to include a link to his GlobalStar Google Map, and I've taken the liberty of superimposing some ground tracks that conform to the orientation of the primary LHA.

The locations in the notices are precise, but I don't think they are very accurate.  They each state "within 40.5 nautical miles" after the coordinates. ...

They might not be very accurate, but the shape of the ground track should at least be a curve.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Orbiter on 06/21/2022 12:02 am
There was a dogleg. You can see it in the streak shots.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: OneSpeed on 06/21/2022 12:22 am
There was a dogleg. You can see it in the streak shots.

So the Mission Control Audio webcast is wrong? I can see an initial roll to the azimuth, but no actual dogleg (a sharp yaw).
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: su27k on 06/21/2022 12:48 am
The theory that they're some sort of prototype Starlink 2.0 satellites that they're launching without anyone knowing falls itself apart when you consider the fact that they'd have to be approved by the FCC. If there were any Starlinks in this flight of any kind they would have to be of the older generation and/or be for a government agency which wouldn't necessarily need FCC approval. That or whoever proposes that theory has to include SpaceX comitting an illegal action that could entail the removal of their rights to operate the Starlink constellation.

Not necessarily, SpaceX didn't file anything when they started flying v1.5, what can be flown under their existing Gen1 license is not clearly defined. Should be obvious that if they did fly Gen2 prototype, it'll still be using the same spectrum as Gen1, this would eliminate most of the concerns from FCC. The altitude and inclination of USA 320 is pretty close to one of the Gen1 orbits as well (97.5 degrees vs 97.6 degrees, 540km vs 560km)

Or they could sidestep FCC by asking their DoD customer such as SDA to classify the launch as part of the DoD program. For example it's quite possible that they're using Starlink v2 bus for their SDA missile warning satellites, so they could ask SDA to authorize a test launch or two of this bus as part of the SDA constellation program. This way SDA gets the peace of mind that their missile warning satellite would actually work once launched, and SpaceX gets to test Starlink v2 bus early, win-win.

SpaceX did file an updated constellation planning to add v1.5 satellites and needed special permission to launch the laser link satellites on Transporter-1 for the polar shells.

SpaceX filed an updated constellation plan so that they can move all the satellites from 1200km to 550km, in the same filing they added polar shells, this is a change of all the shells of the constellation, it's not specific to a satellite design. The designation "v1.0" or "v1.5" did not appear in this filing, what FCC cares most is the orbit and spectrum, not some satellite design.

FCC didn't approve this new constellation plan until April 2021, so when SpaceX wants to fly some Starlink to polar orbit on Transporter-1 in Jan 2021, they're flying to an orbit not approved by FCC yet, this is why they need to ask special permission. It has nothing to do with the fact that the satellites flown to polar orbits are v1.5, they could very well fly v1.0 on Transporter-1 and they'd still need to ask for permission. In fact we don't know that those flown on Transporter-1 are v1.5's, they're likely prototypes since they were all deorbited in less than a year.

I believe the first official v1.5 launch is Group 2-1 on September 13, 2021, with Elon Musk's confirmation: https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1436541063406264320
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : Unknown and Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: su27k on 06/21/2022 01:51 am
https://twitter.com/planet4589/status/1538960051414646796

Quote
Space-Track confirms the presence of four secret payloads on the Globalstar Falcon 9 launch  - USA 328 to USA 331, catalog 52889 to 52892, orbital data not available. One piece of debris, probably a Starlink-style tension rod?

Just realized the significance of the number 4: It's the # of missile warning satellites SDA contracted SpaceX to build: https://spacenews.com/spacex-l3harris-win-space-development-agency-contracts-to-build-missile-warning-satellites/

Quote
The Space Development Agency awarded  $193.5 million to L3Harris and $149 million to SpaceX to build four satellites each to detect and track ballistic and hypersonic missiles.

Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: gongora on 06/21/2022 01:58 am
They aren't the SDA satellites, those will launch later.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: su27k on 06/21/2022 02:07 am
They aren't the SDA satellites, those will launch later.

Well they're not the ones specified in the SDA launch contract, those goes to near polar orbit at 950km. But it's a awful big coincidence here don't you think? Seems to me this could be some kind of testing for SDA satellites.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: gongora on 06/21/2022 02:42 am
But it's a awful big coincidence here don't you think?

I really don't.  The government launches lots of different satellites.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 06/21/2022 03:09 am
https://twitter.com/cgbassa/status/1539044005564100609?s=21&t=m1HdleuTxMXnV1glSXGX3g
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Orbiter on 06/21/2022 03:19 am
There was a dogleg. You can see it in the streak shots.

So the Mission Control Audio webcast is wrong? I can see an initial roll to the azimuth, but no actual dogleg (a sharp yaw).

I have photographed dozens of streak shots. None of them have that little kink towards the end of the ascent unless there's a dogleg. There is a yaw right at the end of first stage ascent that I have never seen before.

https://twitter.com/SLDelta45/status/1538644018535481347/photo/1
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: OneSpeed on 06/21/2022 03:32 am
I have photographed dozens of streak shots. None of them have that little kink towards the end of the ascent unless there's a dogleg. There is a yaw right at the end of first stage ascent that I have never seen before.

Sure, but how many launches have you photographed that both landed on an ASDS, and performed direct injection to a 533 x 533km orbit? This launch had an unusually high amount of loft. Perhaps what you are seeing is a pitch up after the gravity turn is complete?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: russianhalo117 on 06/21/2022 03:59 am
The theory that they're some sort of prototype Starlink 2.0 satellites that they're launching without anyone knowing falls itself apart when you consider the fact that they'd have to be approved by the FCC. If there were any Starlinks in this flight of any kind they would have to be of the older generation and/or be for a government agency which wouldn't necessarily need FCC approval. That or whoever proposes that theory has to include SpaceX comitting an illegal action that could entail the removal of their rights to operate the Starlink constellation.

Not necessarily, SpaceX didn't file anything when they started flying v1.5, what can be flown under their existing Gen1 license is not clearly defined. Should be obvious that if they did fly Gen2 prototype, it'll still be using the same spectrum as Gen1, this would eliminate most of the concerns from FCC. The altitude and inclination of USA 320 is pretty close to one of the Gen1 orbits as well (97.5 degrees vs 97.6 degrees, 540km vs 560km)

Or they could sidestep FCC by asking their DoD customer such as SDA to classify the launch as part of the DoD program. For example it's quite possible that they're using Starlink v2 bus for their SDA missile warning satellites, so they could ask SDA to authorize a test launch or two of this bus as part of the SDA constellation program. This way SDA gets the peace of mind that their missile warning satellite would actually work once launched, and SpaceX gets to test Starlink v2 bus early, win-win.

SpaceX did file an updated constellation planning to add v1.5 satellites and needed special permission to launch the laser link satellites on Transporter-1 for the polar shells.

SpaceX filed an updated constellation plan so that they can move all the satellites from 1200km to 550km, in the same filing they added polar shells, this is a change of all the shells of the constellation, it's not specific to a satellite design. The designation "v1.0" or "v1.5" did not appear in this filing, what FCC cares most is the orbit and spectrum, not some satellite design.

FCC didn't approve this new constellation plan until April 2021, so when SpaceX wants to fly some Starlink to polar orbit on Transporter-1 in Jan 2021, they're flying to an orbit not approved by FCC yet, this is why they need to ask special permission. It has nothing to do with the fact that the satellites flown to polar orbits are v1.5, they could very well fly v1.0 on Transporter-1 and they'd still need to ask for permission. In fact we don't know that those flown on Transporter-1 are v1.5's, they're likely prototypes since they were all deorbited in less than a year.

I believe the first official v1.5 launch is Group 2-1 on September 13, 2021, with Elon Musk's confirmation: https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1436541063406264320
Since they are government sats NTIA is primary for spectrum and filings with NTIA and FCC having monthly meetings for coordination of spectrum and orbits of federal users.

https://ntia.gov/
https://ntia.gov/office/OSM
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: alugobi on 06/21/2022 04:15 am
How do you know that those four undiscussed sats are for the government?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: russianhalo117 on 06/21/2022 04:24 am
How do you know that those four undiscussed sats are for the government?
Because sats with the USA designation have filed spectrum use with NTIA. I use communications equipment that uses NTIA allocated spectrum from government terrestrial, airborne and spaceborne assets as part of one of the places that I work. I also have family and friends on both sides that work or have formerly worked at NTIA and for various USA Sat operators in various roles.
NTIA OSM is the liason to FCC which directs itt prevent domestic and international assignment of government allocated spectrum. There amhave been several examples of GEO Commsat operators launching sats only for them to find out that they are operating in reserved or allocated NATO and NTIA spectrum.

Best example I can recall was SkyTerra 1, 2 (MSV 1, 2, SA) which were blocked by NTIA for intending to use frequency range that could cause interference to those allocated to NAVSTAR/GPS et al and another similar instance triggered the dead cat bounce and prolonged spiral of SPRINT.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Citabria on 06/21/2022 01:39 pm
I have photographed dozens of streak shots. None of them have that little kink towards the end of the ascent unless there's a dogleg. There is a yaw right at the end of first stage ascent that I have never seen before.

Sure, but how many launches have you photographed that both landed on an ASDS, and performed direct injection to a 533 x 533km orbit? This launch had an unusually high amount of loft. Perhaps what you are seeing is a pitch up after the gravity turn is complete?

Agreed. The on-board shows the plume bending to upper left, toward the horizon. This is commonly visible in other launches with a pitch up, or positive angle of attack. When the on-board remains visible (not shown this time), you can see the plume straighten out just before MECO, because they want zero angle of attack for staging.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Orbiter on 06/21/2022 01:44 pm
I have photographed dozens of streak shots. None of them have that little kink towards the end of the ascent unless there's a dogleg. There is a yaw right at the end of first stage ascent that I have never seen before.

Sure, but how many launches have you photographed that both landed on an ASDS, and performed direct injection to a 533 x 533km orbit? This launch had an unusually high amount of loft. Perhaps what you are seeing is a pitch up after the gravity turn is complete?

I will concede that possibility. It could be a pitch up that looks like a yaw due to the fact the vehicle is moving both away & parallel to the Earth.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: TimTri on 06/21/2022 02:06 pm
C. Basso on the SeeSat-L mailing list was able to observe the four classified payloads (as well as a fifth object, likely debris from the deployment mechanism) and provide accurate TLEs for all of them. There is a lot of advanced stuff in his post, but the TLEs at the very bottom might be of interest to those who know how to use them.

Like to the mailing list archive:
http://www.satobs.org/seesat/Jun-2022/0090.html

TLEs:

1 99654U 22671E   22171.97791079  .00000000  00000-0  50000-4 0    05
2 99654  52.9957 223.8538 0001000   0.0000  63.4553 15.11237881    07
# 20220620.98-20220620.98, 3 measurements, 0.010 deg rms
1 99655U 22671F   22171.97796925  .00000000  00000-0  50000-4 0    01
2 99655  52.9814 223.8744 0001000   0.0000  63.7125 15.10737863    01
# 20220620.98-20220620.98, 3 measurements, 0.008 deg rms
1 99656U 22671G   22171.97796925  .00000000  00000-0  50000-4 0    02
2 99656  53.0218 223.9444 0001000   0.0000  63.6104 15.10953506    00
# 20220620.98-20220620.98, 3 measurements, 0.009 deg rms
1 99657U 22671H   22171.97796925  .00000000  00000-0  50000-4 0    03
2 99657  52.8013 223.3984 0001000   0.0000  63.8870 15.10783344    07
# 20220620.98-20220620.98, 3 measurements, 0.005 deg rms
1 99658U 22671J   22171.97805575  .00000000  00000-0  50000-4 0    06
2 99658  52.9706 223.7012 0001000   0.0000  63.7275 15.12075317    08
# 20220620.98-20220620.98, 2 measurements, 0.000 deg rms

These 5 objects were about 5 minutes early compared to Marco's 70001
search elset. The first 4 were equally spaced on the sky and of equal
brightness, with the latter trailing and being brighter. These must be
the covert payloads (USA 328-311, 52889-52892/22064B-E) launched with
the GLOBALSTAR FM15 satellite, as well as the reported piece of Falcon
9 debris (52893/22064F). Hopefully these search orbits will be
sufficient to observe these satellites again over the next few days.
Title: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Star One on 06/21/2022 04:30 pm
More information on these two links:

http://www.satobs.org/seesat/Jun-2022/0096.html

http://www.satobs.org/seesat/Jun-2022/0097.html
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/21/2022 04:57 pm
Midday arrivals:

✔ B1060 (SL 4-19) - first booster to fly 13 times!

✔ 4 fairing halves (One not looking too great and not covered with a tarp)

Just waiting for B1061 to return from Globalstar in a few days time.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1539287516511186947
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/21/2022 05:33 pm
This time, Bob returned with 3 intact fairings from Globalstar and Starlink 4-19, while Doug towing ASOG had the other faring tucked away in the back!

https://twitter.com/JerryPikePhoto/status/1539288201289940992
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/21/2022 05:36 pm
Some bonus footage of the Canaveral pilot boarding Bob prior to sailing into the port..

https://twitter.com/JerryPikePhoto/status/1539300321029148675
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: TimTri on 06/21/2022 05:49 pm
Was able to image our four secret payloads, an associated F9 debris object and Globalstar FM15!
https://twitter.com/appletimtri/status/1539277686362841089?s=21&t=YGDoTS0P1inGiguJvlJRrA
https://twitter.com/appletimtri/status/1539291829652291585?s=21&t=YGDoTS0P1inGiguJvlJRrA
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Reynold on 06/21/2022 07:31 pm
There is speculation in this article that the four satellites might be missile warning ones SpaceX was contracted to build for the DoD back in 2020.  If so, they would be a bit ahead of schedule, these were scheduled to launch in late 2022 which, with any other company, would mean early 2023.  :)

https://spaceexplored.com/2022/06/20/spacex-launched-four-classified-payloads-on-globalstar-mission-according-to-tracking-data/
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/22/2022 12:29 am
Just Read the Instructions droneship and B1061 (towed by Finn Falgout) should arrive at Port Canaveral on June 22nd, following the Globalstar launch.

Arrival currently listed as mid-afternoon but subject to change.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1539388377023365122
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/22/2022 10:52 am
Strange things in the sky..

Almost two hours after launch on June 19th, the upper stage of the @SpaceX #Falcon9 deployed the Globalstar satellite; the smoke we see was the "puff" of separation. It happened so far above Earth, more than 700 miles high. 1/

https://twitter.com/_AstroErika/status/1538790181087719424
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Star One on 06/22/2022 11:00 am
There is speculation in this article that the four satellites might be missile warning ones SpaceX was contracted to build for the DoD back in 2020.  If so, they would be a bit ahead of schedule, these were scheduled to launch in late 2022 which, with any other company, would mean early 2023.  :)

https://spaceexplored.com/2022/06/20/spacex-launched-four-classified-payloads-on-globalstar-mission-according-to-tracking-data/
A respected poster up thread has already stated they are not SDA satellites.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: edzieba on 06/22/2022 03:23 pm
They're the wrong size (SpaceX's Tracking Layer birds are much larger than stock Starlinks), going to the wrong orbit (should be 950km polar), from the wrong coast, to be the SDA satellites. Those already have a contract to launch from Vandenberg later this year, and are a a white project rather than black.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/22/2022 05:41 pm
ETA is approx 3pm ET today.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1539586036900270081
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Jim on 06/22/2022 05:48 pm
There is speculation in this article that the four satellites might be missile warning ones SpaceX was contracted to build for the DoD back in 2020.  If so, they would be a bit ahead of schedule, these were scheduled to launch in late 2022 which, with any other company, would mean early 2023.  :)


no,  SpaceX has just as many delays in new projects.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/22/2022 06:13 pm
Looks like we have a #spacex #falcon9 booster coming ashore soon, about 8nmi off the coast!

https://twitter.com/AstraMagica/status/1539659088736309248
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/22/2022 07:19 pm
B1061 is inbound to Port Canaveral for 3pm ET on JRTI.

Just waiting for ASOG to be repositioned in port after B1060 was unloaded earlier.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1539670919626592256
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: gongora on 06/22/2022 07:43 pm
The video in this post seems to show one of the four USA sats tumbling:
https://sattrackcam.blogspot.com/2022/06/observing-newly-launched-usa-328-usa.html
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 06/22/2022 07:44 pm
https://twitter.com/cygnusx112/status/1539695119653289985

Quote
Booster 1061 entering Port Canaveral. #SpaceX
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: alugobi on 06/22/2022 07:57 pm
The video in this post seems to show one of the four USA sats tumbling:
https://sattrackcam.blogspot.com/2022/06/observing-newly-launched-usa-328-usa.html
What Falcon 9 debris would be so bright?
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Slothman on 06/22/2022 08:08 pm
The video in this post seems to show one of the four USA sats tumbling:
https://sattrackcam.blogspot.com/2022/06/observing-newly-launched-usa-328-usa.html
What Falcon 9 debris would be so bright?

None that is specifically falcon 9. The fairing halves were obv. Recovered and the upper stage went on to another inclination to drop the globalstar sat. No other piece of F9 is supposed to come off at that point. So it's a piece of the deployment menchanism, maybe the 4 sats were wrapped up in a big box on top of the rideshare dispenser (maybe for secrecy reasons during integration?), So they could be deployed as one bundle and then separated out of that box.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/22/2022 08:10 pm
Two recovered Falcon 9 boosters meet up in Port Canaveral!

https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1539698701786038272
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/22/2022 08:11 pm
Some close ups of booster 1061 that flew the #Globalstar mission. #SpaceX..

https://twitter.com/Cygnusx112/status/1539699169652244480
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/22/2022 08:12 pm
There you go! Booster 1060 and 1061 vertical in Port Canaveral. #SpaceX..

https://twitter.com/Cygnusx112/status/1539697189148139522
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/22/2022 08:13 pm
Pretty cool moment to see two recovered #SpaceX boosters in Port at the same time.

https://twitter.com/Cygnusx112/status/1539697959151046658
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/22/2022 08:13 pm
Humans for scale by the Falcon 9 landing legs. #SpaceX..

https://twitter.com/Cygnusx112/status/1539699831140225026
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 06/22/2022 08:54 pm
https://twitter.com/johnkrausphotos/status/1539713023299944450

Quote
Falcon 9 B1061 returns to Cape Canaveral today as Falcon 9 B1060 is being processed on the dock after its return yesterday. The two boosters launched the Globalstar FM15 satellite and 53 Starlink satellites in recent days.

See more of my newest photos → johnkrausphotos.com/New
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: TimTri on 06/22/2022 08:56 pm
TLEs for all objects from this launch are now on Heavens Above!
Thanks to u/scriptmonkey420 on Reddit for the heads up.

Globalstar FM15
https://www.heavens-above.com/orbit.aspx?satid=52888&lat=0&lng=0&loc=Unspecified&alt=0&tz=UCT

USA 328-331
https://www.heavens-above.com/orbit.aspx?satid=52889&lat=0&lng=0&loc=Unspecified&alt=0&tz=UCT

https://www.heavens-above.com/orbit.aspx?satid=52890&lat=0&lng=0&loc=Unspecified&alt=0&tz=UCT

https://www.heavens-above.com/orbit.aspx?satid=52891&lat=0&lng=0&loc=Unspecified&alt=0&tz=UCT

https://www.heavens-above.com/orbit.aspx?satid=52892&lat=0&lng=0&loc=Unspecified&alt=0&tz=UCT

Falcon 9 DEB
https://www.heavens-above.com/orbit.aspx?satid=52893&lat=0&lng=0&loc=Unspecified&alt=0&tz=UCT
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/22/2022 11:45 pm
Double Trouble

B1061 arrived onboard Just Read the Instructions completing the Globalstar-2 mission. Photo bombing is B1060, which arrived yesterday and is almost ready for transport.

https://twitter.com/julia_bergeron/status/1539725450238480385
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/22/2022 11:46 pm
this is getting out of hand, now there are two of them.

https://twitter.com/TrevorMahlmann/status/1539722793939607553
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: meekGee on 06/23/2022 01:03 am
Hysterical.  SpaceX needs a control tower for ground traffic..  Airline-like operations indeed.
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/23/2022 05:58 pm
It's all about the details

https://twitter.com/rocketalli/status/1539988241591435265
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/24/2022 12:32 am
When @SpaceX launched the #Globalstar communications satellite on June 19th, analysts knew something was not quite right. The Globalstar was not big enough to fill the #Falcon9. Something else must be inside. The secret contents: a train of four new classified satellites. 1/

These objects (USA 328 - 331) were covertly launched with Globalstar FM15. The second object in the 'train', USA 329, is slowly varying in brightness, which might indicate it is tumbling. It varies between about magnitude +5 and +10 with a period of around half a minute. 2/

The other payloads are steady in brightness, at about magnitude +7/+8. A much brighter 5th object following the train, at about mag +4.5 to +5, is a piece of debris from the Falcon 9 rocket that carried the satellites to space. 3/3

https://twitter.com/_AstroErika/status/1540062222252130306
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Chinakpradhan on 06/26/2022 05:59 am
https://twitter.com/coastal8049/status/1540814814892609537?s=20&t=KNXQ3kh2M5me3VtCqVK4rQ
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Rondaz on 06/26/2022 10:33 pm
What’s up Booster 1061.9? Not much, just hanging around.

https://twitter.com/ThemeParkRob/status/1540793707607117825
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: SPKirsch on 06/27/2022 04:32 pm
https://twitter.com/willitstimothy/status/1541434766473547776
Quote
@elonmusk Thanks for the beautiful view yesterday Elon.
#JustReadTheInstructions #B1061
Title: Re: SpaceX F9 : USA 328-331 / Globalstar FM15 : SLC-40 : 19 June 2022 (04:27 UTC)
Post by: Coveman on 06/28/2022 02:43 pm
If my records are correct, the reused fairing halves of the Globalstar mission were both record-brakers: The passive had the shortest turn-around for a half (44 d), and the active had the longest turn-around (489 d).