Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021  (Read 124635 times)

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #240 on: 11/24/2021 06:40 am »
Congratulations to the entire launch campaign team!

And thank you, great 👍 job, to our webcasters and to Steven Pietrobon!
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Offline Star One

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #241 on: 11/24/2021 08:49 am »
Congratulations to all involved in this launch.

NASA’s archived launch coverage on YT:


Offline eeergo

Power positive (important milestone for these still relatively new ROSA panels)!

https://twitter.com/NASA/status/1463441008834797568

Thanks for the coverage here, much appreciated to catch up for those of us who couldn't follow it live!

Offline eeergo

And TM from a while ago from New Norcia (LoS has since occurred):

https://twitter.com/esaoperations/status/1463407737845526532
-DaviD-

Offline dsmillman

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #244 on: 11/24/2021 09:37 am »
Dart is now communicating through Madrid using DSS54.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #245 on: 11/24/2021 11:04 am »
Beautiful launch of NASA’s DART mission aboard Falcon 9 as seen from Santa Ynez, CA.

https://twitter.com/w00ki33/status/1463419887481540612

Offline centaurinasa

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Offline Vettedrmr

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #247 on: 11/24/2021 11:37 am »
Not sure if I missed something previously or if it's already been said, but:

Great to see you back on coverage Steven, even if it's just a one-off.  Just feels right when you're driving.

Normally I'd just hit the "Like" button to agree, but this one takes more.  Others do a great job covering launches, but it's good to see a familiar "face".

Have a good one,
Mike
Aviation/space enthusiast, retired control system SW engineer, doesn't know anything!

Offline Rondaz

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #248 on: 11/24/2021 12:21 pm »
NASA, SpaceX Launch DART, First Planetary Defense Test Mission

Linda Herridge Posted on November 24, 2021

NASA’s Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission — the world’s first full-scale mission to test technology for defending the planet against potential asteroid or comet hazards — launched Tuesday, Nov. 23, at 10:21 p.m. PST on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 4 East at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California.

Just one part of NASA’s larger planetary defense strategy, DART—built and managed by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland—will send a spacecraft to impact a known asteroid that is not a threat to Earth, to slightly change its motion in a way that can be accurately measured via ground-based telescopic observations. DART will show that a spacecraft can autonomously navigate to a target asteroid and intentionally collide with it—a method of asteroid deflection called kinetic impact. The test will provide important data to help us better prepare for an asteroid that might pose an impact hazard to Earth, should one ever be discovered.

“DART is turning science fiction into science fact and is a testament to NASA’s proactivity and innovation for the benefit of all” said NASA Administrator Bill Nelson. “In addition to all the ways NASA studies our universe and our home planet, we’re also working to protect that home, and this test will help prove out one viable way to protect our planet from a hazardous asteroid should one ever be discovered that is headed toward Earth.”

At 11:16 p.m. PST, DART separated from the second stage of its launch vehicle. Minutes later, mission operators at the Johns Hopkins APL received the first spacecraft telemetry data and started the process of “detumbling” the spacecraft to a safe orientation for deploying its solar arrays.

“At its core, DART is a mission of preparedness, and it is also a mission of unity and international collaboration,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “An international collaboration that involves DART, the Italian Space Agency’s LICIACube that will watch DART’s impact, and the European Space Agency’s Hera investigations and science teams to follow on, will help researchers worldwide to extract the best possible information for planetary defense and solar system science from these groundbreaking space missions.”

DART’s one-way trip is to the Didymos asteroid system, which is comprised of a pair of asteroids – one small and one large – that orbit a common center of gravity. DART’s “target” is the asteroid moonlet Dimorphos, which is approximately 530 feet (160 meters) in diameter and orbits Didymos, which is approximately 2,560 feet (780 meters) in diameter. Since Dimorphos orbits the larger asteroid Didymos at much slower relative speed than the pair orbits the Sun, the slight orbit change resulting from DART’s kinetic impact within the binary system can be measured much more easily than a change in the orbit of a single asteroid around the Sun.

“While there are currently no known asteroid hazards to Earth, a mission like DART requires a hazard to be identified years to decades in advance—an endeavor that is ongoing and possible with the technology we currently have” said Lindley Johnson, planetary defense officer at NASA Headquarters. “This test, in tandem with the Near-Earth Object Surveyor Mission, an infrared space-based telescope scheduled for launch later this decade designed to help expedite our ability to discover and characterize most of the potentially hazardous asteroids and comets that come within 30 million miles of Earth’s orbit, are important steps to helps us learn all we can should we ever be faced with an asteroid hazard.”

The spacecraft will intercept the Didymos system in late September of 2022, intentionally slamming into the smaller Dimorphos at roughly 4 miles per second (6 kilometers per second), so that the spacecraft alters the asteroid’s path around Didymos. Scientists estimate the kinetic impact will shorten Dimorphos’ orbit by several minutes and will precisely measure that change using telescopes on Earth. The results will both validate and improve scientific computer models that are critical to predicting the effectiveness of the kinetic impact technique as a reliable method for asteroid deflection technology.

“It is an indescribable feeling to see something you’ve been involved with since the ‘words on paper’ stage become real and sent hurtling into space,” said Andy Rivkin, DART team investigation lead at APL. “This is just the end of the first act, and I know the investigation team will stay busy over the next year preparing for the burst of activity to follow DART’s kinetic impact — but there is a lot to celebrate right now!”

DART’s single instrument, the camera DRACO (Didymos Reconnaissance and Asteroid Camera for Optical navigation) camera, will turn on a week from now and provide first images from the spacecraft. DART will continue to travel just outside of Earth’s orbit around the Sun for the next 10 months until next fall when Didymos and Dimorphos will be a relatively close 6.8 million miles (11 million kilometers) from Earth. A sophisticated guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) system, working together with algorithms developed at APL called SMART Nav (Small-body Maneuvering Autonomous Real Time Navigation) will enable the DART spacecraft to identify and distinguish between the two asteroids at Didymos and then, working in concert with the other GNC elements, direct the spacecraft toward Dimorphos, all within roughly an hour of impact. LICIACube (Light Italian Cubesat for Imaging of Asteroids), provided by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), will ride along with DART be released prior to DART’s impact. If all goes according to plan, LICIACube will capture images of the DART impact, the resulting ejecta cloud, possibly a glimpse of the impact crater on the surface of Dimorphos created by DART’s impact, as well as the back side of Dimorphos, which DRACO will never have a chance to see, to gather further data to help prove out the kinetic model.

The Johns Hopkins APL manages the DART mission for NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office as a project of the agency’s Planetary Missions Program Office. The agency provides support for the mission from several centers, including the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, Johnson Space Center in Houston, Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, and Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The launch is managed by NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. SpaceX is the rocket provider for the DART launch.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/dart/2021/11/24/nasa-spacex-launch-dart-first-planetary-defense-test-mission/

Offline LouScheffer

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #249 on: 11/24/2021 12:55 pm »
Re questions about the parking orbit: there's a trajectory now on JPL Horizons.
It implies a 230 x 300 km x 64.7 deg parking orbit  (J2000 rather than TEME) followed by a burn to 263 x -135281 km x 64.7
(C3 of 6.52 km2/s2).
JPL Horizons (for those who don't know) is a publicly available web site that allows you to tell where most spacecraft appear on the sky, as seen from any spot on Earth (or lots of other places - it's pretty versatile).  This is used by radio amateurs to point their antennas, and get signals from spacecraft.  Since their antennas are much smaller than DSN, they can see general properties (carrier, doppler shift) but only get enough signal to decode the telemetry in cases where the signal is unusually strong.

JPL sometimes adds the data to Horizons before the launch.  Obviously it's just an estimate at that time, but if the launch goes off on time, the trajectory will be accurate, and amateur observers can pick up the probe's signals as soon as it rises above their local horizon.  Here's an example of Horizons output, after asking for the sky location, range, and tracking rates for DART, looking from Toulouse, France, in the first few hours of flight.
Quote
****************************************************************************************************************
 Date__(UT)__HR:MN     R.A._____(ICRF)_____DEC             delta      deldot  Sky_motion  Sky_mot_PA  RelVel-ANG
****************************************************************************************************************
$$SOE
 2021-Nov-24 07:00 *m  18 37 11.99 -83 29 02.9  0.00007666933394   1.8545932   10446.803   310.71253   10.845379
 2021-Nov-24 08:00 *m  16 07 25.42 -13 24 43.4  0.00017593505566   4.5949259   1510.1316   3.4031868   55.049145
 2021-Nov-24 09:00 *m  16 11 52.89 +01 43 27.5  0.00028239126965   4.2553681   555.78497   4.3965106   65.971320
 2021-Nov-24 10:00 *m  16 13 52.57 +08 26 46.3  0.00038170297711   4.0189157   295.50046   3.6183277   71.260402

Note that it rises above the local horizon (DEC > 0) at about 09:00 UTC.

Here's a message from a dedicated amateur observer in Toulouse, and a plot of the signal.
Quote
  A screen shot of  DART  satellite  X band carrier catched @ F 5PL station  near  Toulouse FRANCE

Le mer. 24 nov. 2021 à 10:43, bertrand PINEL via groups.io <[email protected]> a écrit :
Hello  Amateur - DSN  boys ,

DART  AOS  09:33 UTC  8421,6756 MHz   
Signal strenght : excellent : > + 35 dB ( 1 Hertz )  .
DART launched at about 6:21 UTC, so this is only about 30 minutes after it became visible.  Amazing work...
« Last Edit: 11/24/2021 09:06 pm by LouScheffer »

Offline ChrisC

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #250 on: 11/24/2021 03:11 pm »
Great to see you back on coverage Steven, even if it's just a one-off.  Just feels right when you're driving.

Good thing Steven was monitoring the SpaceX feed.  NASA's coverage of the launch itself was about as bad as I've ever seen, with factual errors, messed up camera shots and poor coverage in general.  The interviews in between the critical events were fine, but the coverage of the launch and orbital maneuvers was a mess.

Neither SpaceX nor NASA showed the orbital track graphic DURING the Earth escape burn.  That would have been a great opportunity to illustrate what was happening, showing how the arc changes and suddenly whips into deep space.  Put it up on a split screen with the Mvac view ...
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Offline SciNews

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #251 on: 11/24/2021 04:39 pm »
The Virtual Telescope Project  - The Nasa’s Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission and its booster: a image - 24 Nov. 2021
https://www.virtualtelescope.eu/2021/11/24/the-nasas-double-asteroid-redirection-test-dart-mission-and-its-booster-a-image-24-nov-2021/

Offline Rondaz

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Online edkyle99

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #253 on: 11/24/2021 10:00 pm »
I believe this was Falcon 9's first launch directly to solar orbit.

 - Ed Kyle

Offline vaporcobra

I believe this was Falcon 9's first launch directly to solar orbit.

 - Ed Kyle

Concur. I believe that's what SpaceX's webcast host meant when they said that DART is Falcon 9's first interplanetary launch. Technically, F9 S2 intentionally inserted itself into heliocentric orbit after launching TESS and I think DSCOVR's S2 also eventually drifted into heliocentric orbit. But F9 went there directly and w/ a payload for DART.

Offline OneSpeed

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #255 on: 11/24/2021 10:50 pm »
Here is a plot of the DART second stage mission telemetry.

Perhaps the outstanding feature is the S2 peak acceleration of about 7.5g, achievable due to the low 610kg mass of the impactor payload.
« Last Edit: 11/24/2021 10:57 pm by OneSpeed »

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #256 on: 11/25/2021 01:02 am »
A friendly reminder:
As the science team begins checking out the spacecraft, we'll transition from the launch thread  here to the DART program thread in the Space Science sub-forum, https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=47874.0 .
« Last Edit: 11/25/2021 01:03 am by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.) My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!" Yes, there are God-given rights. Do you wish to gainsay the Declaration of Independence?

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #257 on: 11/25/2021 01:07 am »
Looks like no one posted about the wildfire DART's static fire test caused so posting the summary report:


Online abaddon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #258 on: 11/25/2021 01:28 am »
I believe this was Falcon 9's first launch directly to solar orbit.

 - Ed Kyle
Wasn’t the Falcon Heavy demo launch to a solar orbit?

Offline Vettedrmr

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA DART : Vandenberg : Nov. 23/24, 2021
« Reply #259 on: 11/25/2021 01:31 am »
That's not an F9; it's 3 F9s.
Aviation/space enthusiast, retired control system SW engineer, doesn't know anything!

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