Author Topic: Vulcan VC4L - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - NET September 2024  (Read 53515 times)

Offline Jim

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - early 2024
« Reply #40 on: 06/28/2023 12:47 am »
Medium, heavy, and rideshare launch demand is strong. If Peregrine and Dream Chaser are not ready, competitive alternative customers should be scheduled. Playing "schedule chicken" and finger pointing are not an abject circumstance. Even if Centaur V is not ready, get everything else ready. Even if BE-4 is not ready, get everything else ready. Waste anything but time here, because wasted time will waste money and add risk.

No, that is not realistic. Not easy to call up a payload.  Customers don't want to get ready and then be told to stand down.  It costs money to even prep a spacecraft for shipment and get a team together for the launch site.  Also, processing facility space is at a premium and it is also not cheap.
« Last Edit: 06/28/2023 12:54 am by Jim »

Offline Zed_Noir

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - early 2024
« Reply #41 on: 06/28/2023 06:19 am »
Medium, heavy, and rideshare launch demand is strong. If Peregrine and Dream Chaser are not ready, competitive alternative customers should be scheduled. Playing "schedule chicken" and finger pointing are not an abject circumstance. Even if Centaur V is not ready, get everything else ready. Even if BE-4 is not ready, get everything else ready. Waste anything but time here, because wasted time will waste money and add risk.

No, that is not realistic. Not easy to call up a payload.  Customers don't want to get ready and then be told to stand down.  It costs money to even prep a spacecraft for shipment and get a team together for the launch site.  Also, processing facility space is at a premium and it is also not cheap.

There is one particular payload that can be call up in a hurry. A mass simulator. :P

Of course that should only be done for the inaugural launch of a new launcher.

However ULA could fly another launch with a mass simulator if the Vulcan Centaur stack exhibits non-minor issues with the inaugural launch with a mass simulator.

Online DanClemmensen

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - early 2024
« Reply #42 on: 06/28/2023 02:35 pm »
Medium, heavy, and rideshare launch demand is strong. If Peregrine and Dream Chaser are not ready, competitive alternative customers should be scheduled. Playing "schedule chicken" and finger pointing are not an abject circumstance. Even if Centaur V is not ready, get everything else ready. Even if BE-4 is not ready, get everything else ready. Waste anything but time here, because wasted time will waste money and add risk.

No, that is not realistic. Not easy to call up a payload.  Customers don't want to get ready and then be told to stand down.  It costs money to even prep a spacecraft for shipment and get a team together for the launch site.  Also, processing facility space is at a premium and it is also not cheap.

There is one particular payload that can be call up in a hurry. A mass simulator. :P

Of course that should only be done for the inaugural launch of a new launcher.

However ULA could fly another launch with a mass simulator if the Vulcan Centaur stack exhibits non-minor issues with the inaugural launch with a mass simulator.
I'm sure Elon will sell you a Tesla to use as a mass simulator. It worked for the Falcon Heavy.  :)

Offline ZachS09

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - early 2024
« Reply #43 on: 06/28/2023 09:31 pm »
Medium, heavy, and rideshare launch demand is strong. If Peregrine and Dream Chaser are not ready, competitive alternative customers should be scheduled. Playing "schedule chicken" and finger pointing are not an abject circumstance. Even if Centaur V is not ready, get everything else ready. Even if BE-4 is not ready, get everything else ready. Waste anything but time here, because wasted time will waste money and add risk.

No, that is not realistic. Not easy to call up a payload.  Customers don't want to get ready and then be told to stand down.  It costs money to even prep a spacecraft for shipment and get a team together for the launch site.  Also, processing facility space is at a premium and it is also not cheap.

There is one particular payload that can be call up in a hurry. A mass simulator. :P

Of course that should only be done for the inaugural launch of a new launcher.

However ULA could fly another launch with a mass simulator if the Vulcan Centaur stack exhibits non-minor issues with the inaugural launch with a mass simulator.
I'm sure Elon will sell you a Tesla to use as a mass simulator. It worked for the Falcon Heavy.  :)

I'll take the big ol' concrete block instead, please. I prefer the more traditional take on the mass simulator.
Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - early 2024
« Reply #44 on: 06/29/2023 07:38 am »
I'll take the big ol' concrete block instead, please. I prefer the more traditional take on the mass simulator.

A tank of water is better as you can vent it to space, leaving a lighter structure that re-enters quicker.
« Last Edit: 06/29/2023 07:39 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - early 2024
« Reply #45 on: 06/29/2023 08:08 pm »
Medium, heavy, and rideshare launch demand is strong. If Peregrine and Dream Chaser are not ready, competitive alternative customers should be scheduled. Playing "schedule chicken" and finger pointing are not an abject circumstance. Even if Centaur V is not ready, get everything else ready. Even if BE-4 is not ready, get everything else ready. Waste anything but time here, because wasted time will waste money and add risk.

No, that is not realistic. Not easy to call up a payload.  Customers don't want to get ready and then be told to stand down.  It costs money to even prep a spacecraft for shipment and get a team together for the launch site.  Also, processing facility space is at a premium and it is also not cheap.

There is one particular payload that can be call up in a hurry. A mass simulator. :P

Of course that should only be done for the inaugural launch of a new launcher.

However ULA could fly another launch with a mass simulator if the Vulcan Centaur stack exhibits non-minor issues with the inaugural launch with a mass simulator.
I'm sure Elon will sell you a Tesla to use as a mass simulator. It worked for the Falcon Heavy.  :)
The Atlas V did not carry a mass simulator on its first launch, and a mass simulator won't work for the Vulcan.

Offline deadman1204

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - early 2024
« Reply #46 on: 06/30/2023 12:13 am »
Medium, heavy, and rideshare launch demand is strong. If Peregrine and Dream Chaser are not ready, competitive alternative customers should be scheduled. Playing "schedule chicken" and finger pointing are not an abject circumstance. Even if Centaur V is not ready, get everything else ready. Even if BE-4 is not ready, get everything else ready. Waste anything but time here, because wasted time will waste money and add risk.

No, that is not realistic. Not easy to call up a payload.  Customers don't want to get ready and then be told to stand down.  It costs money to even prep a spacecraft for shipment and get a team together for the launch site.  Also, processing facility space is at a premium and it is also not cheap.

There is one particular payload that can be call up in a hurry. A mass simulator. :P

Of course that should only be done for the inaugural launch of a new launcher.

However ULA could fly another launch with a mass simulator if the Vulcan Centaur stack exhibits non-minor issues with the inaugural launch with a mass simulator.
I'm sure Elon will sell you a Tesla to use as a mass simulator. It worked for the Falcon Heavy.  :)
The Atlas V did not carry a mass simulator on its first launch, and a mass simulator won't work for the Vulcan.
Why do you say a simulator wouldn't work?

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - early 2024
« Reply #47 on: 07/11/2023 10:27 pm »
Cross-posts; will this delay this launch?
https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/status/1678844068703477762

Quote
Scoop – One of Blue Origin’s BE-4 rocket engines exploded during a test firing in Texas on June 30, according to CNBC sources.

The engine was to be delivered this month to ULA for Vulcan’s Cert-2 launch. More:

https://www.cnbc.com/2023/07/11/jeff-bezos-blue-origin-be-4-rocket-engine-explodes-during-testing.html

Quote
KEY POINTS

Jeff Bezos’ space company Blue Origin suffered a rocket engine explosion while testing its BE-4 rocket engine last month, CNBC has learned.

During a firing on June 30 at Blue Origin’s facility in West Texas, a BE-4 engine detonated about 10 seconds into the test.

A Blue Origin spokesperson confirmed the incident, noting that no personnel were injured and that an investigation is underway, with a “proximate cause” identified.

Article says that the engine that exploded was Vulcan flight engine 3. Not clear what, if any impact there is to Vulcan. Blue Origin have said they will still meet their engine delivery commitments this year.

<snip> Wider implications for the Vulcan programme belong here (with discussion of the engine issue on the BE-4 thread).
« Last Edit: 07/11/2023 10:34 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - H1 2024
« Reply #48 on: 07/13/2023 06:49 pm »
This is still the second launch:
https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/status/1679512399282417666
Quote
ULA CEO @torybruno, during a media roundtable, lays out the upcoming schedule of Vulcan launches:
Cert-1 in 2023 Q4
Cert-2 in first half 2024
First Space Force (NSSL) launch in second half 2024

https://twitter.com/SpcPlcyOnline/status/1679526697157156867
Quote
Centaur V will be qualified for the Cert-1 trajectory for the flight by the end of this year. Remaining tests will be completed in 1st Q 2024. Cert-2 flight is Sierra Space's Dream Chaser "a few months" after Cert-1. First NSSL launch in 2nd Q 2024.
« Last Edit: 07/13/2023 06:56 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - H1 2024
« Reply #49 on: 07/25/2023 05:10 pm »
https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1683886557340610591

Quote
NASA's Joel Montalbano said the agency's current expectation is that Dream Chaser's debut flight to the ISS will take place during the first half of 2024; but acknowledged that potential delays to the Vulcan rocket and spacecraft may require further adjustments to the right.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - H1 2024
« Reply #50 on: 07/31/2023 03:37 am »
Sierra mission patch:

https://twitter.com/systems_zero/status/1685820461504933888

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So I asked and was told I could post this

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - H1 2024
« Reply #51 on: 08/17/2023 11:54 am »
From Blue Origin BE-4 factory thread:

https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1692141606605041833

Quote
Dan Caughran, who runs the Rocket Factory in Decatur, decided to pop next door to Huntsville and check on the BE4 production ramp up at @blueorigin 's brand new, very modern, Rocket Engine Factory.  Lots of WIP! And,... do I spy a #VulcanRocket CERT2 engine in final assembly?

Offline Robert_the_Doll

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - H1 2024
« Reply #52 on: 08/18/2023 12:39 am »
Huntsville is indeed ramping up which is why the Cert-2 engine is being built there rather than Kent:

https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1692329409561427993

Quote
Yes. Huntsville is coming up faster

Offline Robert_the_Doll

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - H1 2024
« Reply #53 on: 08/29/2023 11:47 pm »
https://twitter.com/SierraSpaceCo/status/1696647177357930682

Quote
The cargo module’s folded solar array "wing" being installed to the deployment and release mechanisms.
These arrays provide reliable charging capabilities for all on-board batteries while in orbit.

« Last Edit: 08/29/2023 11:52 pm by Robert_the_Doll »

Offline GewoonLukas_

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Re: Vulcan - Dream Chaser to ISS - CCSFS SLC-41 - H1 2024
« Reply #54 on: 08/30/2023 06:59 pm »
During a press-briefing in advance of the NROL-107 / Silent Barker mission, Tory Bruno says this launch is scheduled for "Very Early Next Year": (25:10)

Lukas C. H. • Hobbyist Mission Patch Artist 🎨 • May the force be with you my friend, Ad Astra Per Aspera ✨️

Offline Robert_the_Doll

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BE-4s for Cert-2 finished and in ATP:

https://twitter.com/Mkanug1/status/1707024461613105423
Quote
@torybruno
 how are the flight 2 engines coming along, and are you done with the failure investigation
https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1707059461314208026
Quote
In ATP Yes, done

Offline Jim

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« Last Edit: 10/10/2023 03:09 pm by Jim »

Offline Tomness

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https://twitter.com/SierraSpaceCo/status/1696647177357930682


Clean room?
Doesn't look like it,  more like a factory floor with PPE, but not in smocks. Back to the ol' days of first couple Cargo Dragons

Offline woods170

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https://twitter.com/SierraSpaceCo/status/1696647177357930682


Clean room?

Not a clean room because it's not needed. The factory in itself meets the required cleanliness levels (which are not at clean room levels anyway). What the image shows is nearly identical to SpaceX mounting solar arrays to Dragon (version 1) in the HIF at LC-40, or attaching the trunk to the capsule in those days (2012). And that was for the first ever Dragon that visited the ISS.
« Last Edit: 10/17/2023 08:19 am by woods170 »

Offline Robert_the_Doll

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https://twitter.com/SgtSchrodinger/status/1717603172708229449
https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1717643108379222205

Quote
Speaking of ATPs, do you have an update for us on the Cert-2 BE-4s? A few weeks ago you'd said they were in ATP in Texas, and I hope things are going well or went well.

Quote
Going well.  Booster is built up and ready to receive them.
« Last Edit: 10/26/2023 09:30 pm by zubenelgenubi »

 

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