Author Topic: Soyuz 2.1a - Progress MS-13 - December 6, 2019 (09:34 UTC)  (Read 27548 times)

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Soyuz 2.1a - Progress MS-13 - December 6, 2019 (09:34 UTC)
« Reply #140 on: 12/09/2019 09:52 am »
To boldly go where no human has gone before !

Offline anik

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Re: Soyuz 2.1a - Progress MS-13 - December 6, 2019 (09:34 UTC)
« Reply #141 on: 12/09/2019 04:54 pm »
Does anyone know the weight of Progress MS-13?

7385.

Are there any small satellites onboard?

No satellites.

Offline eeergo


Are there any small satellites onboard?

No satellites.

In the webcast they showed an animation depicting Cubesat releases. Was it just highlighting the capability?

Also, I didn't get the details (or whether he was indeed talking about this particular Progress flight) but RKK Energya's Dr Beliaev appeared to be talking about a tether sampling system for ultra-low-orbit measurements around 120 km altitude? Is that something foreseen for MS-13's EOM free flight?
-DaviD-

Offline anik

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Re: Soyuz 2.1a - Progress MS-13 - December 6, 2019 (09:34 UTC)
« Reply #143 on: 12/10/2019 07:32 am »
In the webcast they showed an animation depicting Cubesat releases. Was it just highlighting the capability?

Yes.

Also, I didn't get the details (or whether he was indeed talking about this particular Progress flight) but RKK Energya's Dr Beliaev appeared to be talking about a tether sampling system for ultra-low-orbit measurements around 120 km altitude? Is that something foreseen for MS-13's EOM free flight?

It was announced so by him, but we will see whether he meant this Progress or not.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Soyuz 2.1a - Progress MS-13 - December 6, 2019 (09:34 UTC)
« Reply #144 on: 12/10/2019 08:40 pm »
Quote
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/09/2019
74 Progress (74P) Docking: Progress 74P performed a nominal automated rendezvous and docking to the DC1 port.  The automated rendezvous began at GMT 343/08:18:30.   Docking capture occurred at 10:35:11, Progress hooks were closed at ≈10:40:07.  At 13:29 the DC-1/vestibule hatch was opened and at 13:37 the 74P/vestibule hatch was opened.
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Soyuz 2.1a - Progress MS-13 - December 6, 2019 (09:34 UTC)
« Reply #145 on: 04/25/2020 06:44 pm »
Cross-post; my bold:
Setting the record straight on fastest launch-to-docking intervals:

https://twitter.com/anik1982space/status/1253919414002618368

Quote
Anik: This is how sensations are born. The record for the "Progress" in the "MS-12" is 03:18:30. At the "MS-14" - 03:20:14. And if we talk about records “for all the time of manned flights,” “Cosmos-212” docked with “Cosmos-213” for 00:47:13, and “Gemini-11” with “Agena” - for 01:34:06 .
Quote
Dmitry Rogozin: There is a touch! The whole flight took 3 hours 20 minutes. This is the best result for all the time of manned flights.
***

Relatedly: are there plans to further shorten Progress free flight periods?

EDIT: Answering my own question through Anik's tweets (1253882288737312768) :

Quote
Rafail Murtazin, head of RSC Energia's ballistics department, said that the upcoming Progress MS-15, after undocking from ISS in late 2020/early 2021 (later corrected to [Progress] MS-13 in July), is expected to solve elements of a rendezvous circuit after a single orbit (2 hours) with the Station, but without redocking.
« Last Edit: 04/25/2020 06:57 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline ddspaceman

Mark Garcia Posted on July 7, 2020

Russia’s Progress 74 (74P) resupply ship has been packed with trash and obsolete gear and is ready to end its seven-month stay at the orbiting lab. Cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner finalized the cargo transfers today before closing the 74P’s hatch and performing the standard spacecraft leak checks. The 74P will undock Wednesday at 2:23 p.m. EDT from the Pirs docking compartment and descend into Earth’s atmosphere over the South Pacific for a fiery disposal.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2020/07/07/new-satellites-set-for-deployment-cargo-craft-ready-for-departure/

https://twitter.com/roscosmos/status/1280741819194671105

GT: The cargo ship # ProgressMS13 on Wednesday undocks from the International Space Station and will be flooded on Thursday night - https://roscosmos.ru/28780/

The undocking is scheduled for July 8 at 21:22 Moscow time, and at 01:05 Moscow time on July 9 it will enter the Earth’s atmosphere

https://www.roscosmos.ru/28780/

Offline ddspaceman

https://twitter.com/RussianSpaceWeb/status/1280825928323674112

Progress MS-13 to reenter

After the nearly six-and-half-month flight, the Progress MS-13 cargo ship will depart the International Space Station, ISS, for a planned destructive reentry in the Earth's atmosphere during the night from July 8 to July 9, 2000, Moscow Time. According to Roskosmos, the vehicle will undock from the station on July 8, 2020, at 21:22 Moscow Time (2:22 p.m. EDT). Russian cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner, members of the 63rd long-duration expedition aboard the ISS, prepared the vehicle for the undocking.

Once in the autonomous flight, the Russian mission control will command Progress MS-13 to fire its propulsion system against the direction of the flight on July 9, 2020, at 00:31:42 Moscow Time (5:31 p.m. EDT on July 8). The maneuver will last four minutes, resulting in the reentry of the spacecraft over a remote region of the Pacific Ocean at 01:05 Moscow Time on July 9 (6:05 p.m. EDT on July 8). Eight minutes later, any surviving debris of the spacecraft were projected to hit the surface of the ocean, around 1,800 kilometers east of New Zealand. In early July, the Russian authorities issued a warning to sea traffic to avoid two debris impact zones in the region which would be used during the primary and backup reentry attempts.

The departure of Progress MS-13 will free the nadir (Earth-facing) docking port on the SO1 Pirs Docking Compartment of the Russian ISS Segment for the arrival of the fresh Progress MS-15 cargo ship scheduled for launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome on July 23, 2020.
http://www.russianspaceweb.com/progress-ms-13.html#reentry

Offline SMS

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Offline whiztech

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Re: Soyuz 2.1a - Progress MS-13 - December 6, 2019 (09:34 UTC)
« Reply #149 on: 07/09/2020 03:01 am »
https://www.roscosmos.ru/28785/

Google translation:

Quote
"Progress MS-13" completed the flight

Today, on July 9, 2020, in accordance with the flight program of the International Space Station (ISS), the mission of the Progress MS-13 transport cargo vehicle was successfully completed. On Wednesday at 21:22 Moscow time, the ship was undocked with the station.

July 9 at 00:31 Moscow time, the propulsion system of the Progress MS-13 cargo ship was switched on for braking. Four minutes later, she completed work, and the ship continued to decline.

In accordance with the calculated data of the specialists of the TsNIImash Mission Control Center (part of Roscosmos State Corporation), at 01:05 Moscow time, the Progress MS-13 cargo ship entered the Earth’s atmosphere. The fall of non-combustible structural elements of the ship occurred in the non-navigable region of the Pacific Ocean, about 1,800 km southeast of the city of Wellington (New Zealand).

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