Author Topic: Arianespace launch schedule  (Read 1578766 times)

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2840 on: 06/16/2024 09:41 am »
In the Arianespace pressrelease with the announcement of the maiden launch of Ariane 62, Juli 9.
Arianespace also states they have a backlog of 30 Ariane 6 launches.

AFAIK the backlog is.
VA262: Ariane 62 maiden launch.
VA263: CSO3 (Ariane 62 SSO likely with rideshare)
18x Amazon Kuiper 2x A64 & 16x A64 block 2.
5x ESA/EUSPA Galileo 3x gen1 & 2x Gen2.
2x EUMETSAT MetOP SG SSO weather satellites Metop SG A1 & B1 (Ariane 62 SSO likely with rideshare)
3x GTO launches with EUMETSAT (Ariane 64)

For the period 2024 to 2026 15 Ariane 6 have been ordered to launch. The maiden launch and the transition batch of 14 operational launchers. Most likely the transition from P120C to P160C will already take place with the first production lot. The transition period required 140mln of subsidies annually.
For the 2026 to 2029 period Ariane 6 FN16 to FN42 have been precured, 9 annually.
From Arianespace statement we can conclude that they have 12 Ariane6 launches left to sell for the 2026 to 2029 period. otherwise they require the production to be increased.
With this in mind, I do not at all understand where the need to increase the annual subsidies come from.
I see plenty demand for Ariane 6 launch services. So is Arianespace selling the launch services so much under launch cost. Did ESA prepare the member states for a worst case scenario.
The commitments for the second production lot (FN16 to FN42) will only be made during the next ESA ministerial conference. If I'm not mistaken this is planned for November 2025 in Germany.

I think Arianespace is going to update their website in the not to distant future. Most likely they removed the Smallsat payload page because the information on it is very dated.
The Ariane 5 page is no longer relevant, because it's no longer in use. Vega will only be used once more.
The most relevant page will be the Ariane 6 page. Especially because Avio is going to sell the Vega C (and E) launches in the future.
« Last Edit: 06/16/2024 07:10 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline DT1

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2841 on: 06/25/2024 09:53 am »
Just in from today's ESA media briefing on the Ariane 6 inaugural flight:
The launch window on 09 July 2024 extends from 20:00 to 23:00 h CEST (from 15:00 to 18:00 h local time in Kourou or from 18:00 to 21:00 h UTC).
« Last Edit: 06/25/2024 09:53 am by DT1 »
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Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2842 on: 06/25/2024 02:56 pm »
Info about Ariane 6 launch rate up to 2028.
2024  2 launches.
2025  6 launches.
2026  8 launches.
2027 10 launches (final rate of 9-12 annually)
So the transition batch of 14 launches lasts until 2026. 
If this cadence continues at 10 annually the second batch FN16 to FN42 lasts until mid. 2029.
The 50th launch mark will be reached in 2030. Or earlier when the current max launch rate of 12 annually is reached.

Offline DT1

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2843 on: 06/26/2024 05:56 pm »
Just in from today's ESA media briefing on the Ariane 6 inaugural flight:
The launch window on 09 July 2024 extends from 20:00 to 23:00 h CEST (from 15:00 to 18:00 h local time in Kourou or from 18:00 to 21:00 h UTC).

One remark concerning the exact liftoff times of the Ariane 6 flights:
In contrast to the Ariane 5 they do not have to be corrected by the usual 7 seconds. A look into the media kit shows main engine ignition at minus 7 seconds and solid booster ignition and liftoff at 0 (zero) in the launch countdown - as we know it from the Space Shuttle since STS-2.
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Offline Salo

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2845 on: 06/29/2024 11:18 am »
https://www.eumetsat.int/meteosat-satellite-be-launched-spacex
Quote
28 June 2024

During the Council meeting which took place on 26-27 June 2024 the EUMETSAT member states, in line with the organisation’s convention, reiterated their support to European industrial technologies and the objective to maintain an independent access to space for Europe.

MTG-S1 is a unique masterpiece of European technology. This first European sounding satellite in a geostationary orbit will bring a revolution for weather forecasting and climate monitoring in Europe and Africa, and make it possible, for the first time, to observe the full lifecycle of a convective storm from space. Its launch will ensure that national weather services can benefit from new and more accurate data to protect lives, properties and infrastructures.

As such, the EUMETSAT member states decided to award a launch service contract to SpaceX for the launch of the Meteosat Third Generation-Sounder 1 (MTG-S1) satellite on a Falcon 9 rocket in 2025.

“This decision was driven by exceptional circumstances” explains EUMETSAT Director-General Phil Evans. “It does not compromise our standard policy of supporting European partners, and we look forward to a successful SpaceX launch for this masterpiece of European technology.”

Offline Salo

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2846 on: 06/29/2024 11:30 am »
Launched:
№ – Date - Satellite(s) - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

2024
01 -

Foreign launchers:
April 28 - Galileo-FOC FM25 (Patrick), Galileo-FOC FM27 [L12] - Falcon 9 - Kennedy LC-39A - 00:34
May 28 - EarthCARE [Earth Explorer 6] - Falcon 9 - Vandenberg SLC-4E - 22:20

Planned launches:
Date - Satellite(s) - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

2024
July 9 - dummy payload, 3Cat 4, Bikini Demo, CuriumOne, CURIE A (ELaNa 48), CURIE B (ELaNa 48),  GRBBeta, ISTSAT 1, Méditerranée (ROBUSTA-3A), OOV-Cube, SpaceCase SC-X01, hosted payload: PariSat, Peregrinus, SIDLOC, ESA YPSat–Eye2Sky - Ariane 62 (VA262 / FM1) [inaugural flight] - Kourou ELA-4 - 18:00-22:00
NET September - Sentinel-2C - Vega (VV24) - Kourou ELV
Mid-November - Mid-December - TBD - Vega C (VV25/VC03) - Kourou ELV
NET Mid-November - SpaceBelt (x10) - Vega C - Kourou ELV (or 2025)
NET December - KOMPSAT-6 (Arirang-6) - Vega C - Kourou ELV (or 2025)
Late - CSO 3 - Ariane 62 (VA263 / FM2) - Kourou ELA-4

Rideshare:
NET Q4 - SSMS #10: SSO 650 km, Alba Orbital Cluster 10 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET Q4 - Balkan-01 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET Q4 - SSMS #6: SSO 540 km - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET Q4 - SSMS #11: LEO Equatorial - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET Q4 - SSMS #8: SSO 530 km - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET Q4 - SSMS #12: SSO, Alba Orbital Cluster 12 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET Q4 - EAGLE-1 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET Mid-November - PLATiNO-1 - Vega C - Kourou ELV (or 2025)
December - HydroGNSS - TBD - Kourou
Late - CubeSpec - Vega C - Kourou
TBD - PocketQubes - Vega C (VV25) - Kourou ELV
TBD - PocketQubes - Vega C (VV26) - Kourou ELV
TBD - ELSA-m - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - SpeQtral-1 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - RACE 1, RACE 2 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - HYPERFIELD NG (x4) - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - TANGO-Carbon, TANGO-Nitro - Vega C / Ariane 62 - Kourou ELV / ELA-4
TBD - M-ARGO (Miniaturised – Asteroid Remote Geophysical Observer) - TBD - Kourou
TBD - GOMX-5A, GOMX-5B - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - Nano-JASMINE - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - ION-SVC: Astrocast (x10) - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - AlphaSat - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - Iperdrone.0 - Vega C - Kourou ELV

Foreign launchers:
NET July 10 - Transporter-11: AWS prototype - Falcon 9 - Vandenberg SLC-4E
September - Galileo-FOC FM26 (Julina), Galileo-FOC FM28 [L13] - Falcon 9 - Canaveral SLC-40 / Kennedy LC-39A
September - PROBA 3 Coronagraph, PROBA 3 Occulter - PSLV - Sriharikota FLP
October - LUXEOSys (NAOS) - Falcon 9 - Canaveral / Vandenberg SLC-4E (or NLT January 2025)
  NET Q3   December - Sentinel-1C - Falcon 9 - Vandenberg SLC-4E

2025
NET March - BIOMASS [Earth Explorer 7] - Vega C (VV26/VC04) - Kourou ELV
H1 - MTG-S1 (Sentinel-4A) - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
June - Sentinel-1D - Vega C (VV27/VC05) - Kourou ELV
  Q2   September-November - MetOp-SG A1 (EPS-SG-a, Sentinel-5A) - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4 (or April)
  Q1   Q3 - Sentinel-3C - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET Q3 - Space Rider flight 1 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET Q3 - TBD - Vega C (VV28/VC06) - Kourou ELV
Q4 - IRIDE (x10) F1 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Q4 - IRIDE (x15) F2 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Q4 - TBD - Vega C (VV29/VC07) - Kourou ELV
NET Q4 - Space Rider flight 2 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Late - SMILE - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Late - LEO-PNT demonstrator - Vega C (TBD) - Kourou ELV (TBD) (or 2026)
NET Late - first flight - Miura 5 - Kourou
TBD - Galileo-FOC FM29, Galileo-FOC FM30 [L14] - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - Galileo-FOC FM31, Galileo-FOC FM32 [L15] - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4 (or 2026)
TBD - Galileo-FOC FM33, Galileo-FOC FM34 [L16] - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4 (or 2026)
TBD - TBD - Ariane 64 [inaugural flight] - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - Uhura-1 (Node-1) - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - Lunar Rideshare Mission - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - EDRS-D (hosted payload) -  Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - Intelsat-41 (IS-41), Intelsat-44 (IS-44) - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - Syracuse-4C - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - Optus-11 - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - SHALOM - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - CO3D 1, CO3D 2, CO3D 3, CO3D 4 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - CSG-3 - Vega C - Kourou ELV

Rideshare:
Q1 - SSMS #9: SSO 580 km - Vega C - Kourou ELV
June - ESP-MACCS - TBD - Kourou
Q2 - SSMS #7: SSO 580 km - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Q3 - SSMS #13: SSO 650 km - Vega C - Kourou ELV
November - PLATiNO-2 (MAIA) - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Late - Japetus - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - MicroCarb - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - ALINA lander, Audi lunar quattro rover - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - VMMO - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - LUMIO - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - YODA demonstrator (x2) - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - Hemeria GEO sat (x2) - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - GO-1 (GSO small satellites mission) - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4

Foreign launchers:
Q3 - MTG-S1 (Sentinel-4A) - Falcon 9 - Canaveral SLC-40 / Kennedy LC-39A

2026
NET Q1 - Space Rider flight 3 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Midyear 2025  March-April - FLEX [Earth Explorer 8], ALTIUS - Vega C - Kourou ELV (or December 2025)
NET Midyear - Space Rider flight 4 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
  Q1   June-August - MetOp-SG B1 (EPS-SG-b) - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
Q3 - MTG-I2 - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
H2 - Intelsat-45 (IS-45) - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
NET H2 - ClearSpace-1 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
  Q1   Q4 - CO2M-A (Sentinel-7A) - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Q4 - PLATO - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
NET Late - Space Rider flight 5 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - G2G (x2) [L17]  - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - CSG-4 - Vega C - Kourou ELV (or NET 2027)
TBD - KOMPSAT-7 (Arirang-7) - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - SKIM [Earth Explorer 9 candidate] - Vega C/Ariane 62 - Kourou
TBD - TBD - Vega C / IOS-OSPM (inaugural flight) - Kourou ELV
TBD - TBD - Ariane 6 Evo - Kourou ELA-4

Rideshare:
Q2 - SSMS #14: SSO 550 km - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Q3 - SSMS #15: SSO 680 km - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Q3 - SSMS #16: SSO 550 km - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Q4 - MLS #1: GTO - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4

2027
  Q2 2026   Q1 - CO2M-B (Sentinel-7B) - Vega C - Kourou ELV
December - PRISMA2GEN - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Late - Hellas Sat 5 - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - G2G (x2) [L18] - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - EL3 - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - CLTV - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - FORUM [Earth Explorer 9] - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - HRWS-X - Vega C (TBD) - Kourou ELV (TBD)
TBD - SBG-TIR - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - TBD - Vega E+ (inaugural flight) - Kourou ELV

Rideshare:
Q2 - SSMS #17: SSO 550 km - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Q4 - MLS #2: GTO - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4

2028
Midyear - ROSE-L (Sentinel-12A) - TBD - Kourou
  January 2025   September - Sentinel-2D - Vega C - Kourou ELV  (or 2025-2028)
Q4 - CRISTAL-A (Sentinel-9A) - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - Sentinel-3D - TBD - Kourou
TBD - SUSIE - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - SBG-VSWIR - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - Genesis - Vega C (TBD) - Kourou ELV (TBD)
TBD - GRACE-C - TBD - TBD
TBD - ESA-LEO Cargo Return Service - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4

Rideshare:
December 2027  February - MERLIN - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Q2 - SSMS #18: SSO 550 km - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Q3 - MLS #3: GTO - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
Q4 - SSMS #19: LEO 5° 550 km - Vega C - Kourou ELV

Foreign launchers:
Q4 - ExoMars RSP (CM+EDLM ( Rosalind Franklin Rover)) - Falcon Heavy / Super Heavy/Starship - Kennedy LC-39A

2029
January - Human Lunar Exploration (ascent module) - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
  H2 2027   Q2 - CO2M-C (Sentinel-7C) - TBD - Kourou
Q3 - CIMR-A (Sentinel-11A) - TBD - Kourou
Q3 - ARRAKIHS - Vega C - Kourou ELV (or early 2030’s)
NET Q4 - Aeolus FO - TBD - Kourou
TBD - ARIEL, Comet Interceptor (fast mission) - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - Harmony-1 (Earth Explorer 10A, Concordia), Harmony-2 (Earth Explorer 10B, Discordia) - Vega C (TBD) - Kourou ELV (TBD)
TBD - Sentinel-1A 2nd Gen, Harmony (x2) (Stereoid) [Earth Explorer 10] - TBD - Kourou
TBD - LSTM (Sentinel-8A) - TBD - Kourou
TBD - CHIME (Sentinel-10A) - TBD - Kourou
TBD - TanDEM-L - Vega C (TBD) - Kourou ELV (TBD)

Rideshare:
Q2 - SSMS #20: SSO 550 km - Vega C - Kourou ELV
Q3 - MLS #4: GTO - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
Q4 - SSMS #21: LEO 5° 550 km - Vega C - Kourou ELV

2030
Q4 - CRISTAL-B (Sentinel-9B) - Vega C/E - Kourou ELV
November - Sentinel-6C - Vega C/E - Kourou ELV
TBD - NEOMIR - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - TRUTHS - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - ERO [Mars Sample Return] - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4

Rideshare:
TBD - YODA - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4

2031
Q3 - CIMR-B (Sentinel-11B) - TBD - Kourou
TBD - EnVision [M5 mission] - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
  Late 2029   TBD - Vigil-L5 - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4

2032
Q2 - MetOp-SG A2 (Sentinel-5B) - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4

2033
Q1 - MTG-I3 - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
Q1 - MetOp-SG B2 - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
Q3 - Sentinel-3 NG TOPO A - TBD - TBD
Q4 - Sentinel-6 NG B - TBD - TBD

2034
Q3 - Sentinel-3 NG OPT A - TBD - TBD

2035
H1 - MTG-S2 (Sentinel-4B) - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
Q3 - Sentinel-3 NG TOPO B - TBD - TBD
TBD - LISA (x3) (eLISA, NGO) - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4

2036
Q3 - Sentinel-3 NG OPT B - TBD - TBD
Q3 - MTG-I4 - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4

2037
TBD - New ATHENA - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4

2038
December - Sentinel-5C - TBD - Kourou

2039
Q2 - MetOp-SG A3 - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4

2040
Q1 - MetOp-SG B3 - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4

Unclear:
Date - Satellite(s) - Rocket - Launch Site
January 2025 - ISRU Demonstrator (In-Situ Resource Utilisation) - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
NET 2025 - First flight - Zéphyr - Kourou ELD
NET 2025 - Kuiper (xTBD) - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
NET 2025 - Kuiper (xTBD) - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
NET 2025 - TBD - Vega C/VEnUS - Kourou ELV
NET 2025 - TBD - Vega C+ (inaugural flight) - Kourou ELV
NET 2025 - VD20 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET 2025 - VD20 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET 2025 - AWS constellation (x16) - TBD - Kourou
NET 2025 - Balkan (x120) [Endurosat] - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET 2025 - Dream Chaser United Nations space mission - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
2025-2030 - HYPERFIELD NG (x100) [Kuva Space] - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET 2026 - inaugural flight - IFD 2 - Kourou
NET 2026 - IRIDE (x9) F3 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
NET 2026 - IRIDE (x35) second batch - Vega C (multiple launches) - Kourou ELV
NET 2026 - Japetus (x20) [Prométhée] - Vega C - Kourou ELV
2026-2027 - LEO-PNT demonstrator (x5) - TBD - Kourou
2026-2027 - LEO-PNT demonstrator (x5) - TBD - Kourou
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2026-July 2029 - Kuiper (x40) - Ariane 64+ - Kourou ELA-4
2027 - IRIS² constellation (170 sats) - multiple launches - Kourou
NET 2027 - SR-E first flight - Vega E+ - Kourou ELV
NET 2028 - Sentinel-2A 2nd Gen - TBD - Kourou
NET 2028 - Sentinel-3A 2nd Gen - TBD - Kourou
NET 2028 - G2G (x2) - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
NET 2028 - G2G (x2) - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
NET 2028 - G2G (x2) - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
NET 2028 - G2G (x2) - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
NET 2028 - G2G (xTBD) - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4 (multiple launches)
2028-2029 - Celeste (military electromagnetic listening) - TBD - Kourou
Late 2020's - SATCOMBw 3 - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
2032-2033 - Cairt [Earth Explorer 11 candidate] - TBD - Kourou
2032-2033 - Wivern [Earth Explorer 11 candidate] - TBD - Kourou
2036 - CryoRad [Earth Explorer 12 candidate] - TBD - Kourou
2036 - ECO [Earth Explorer 12 candidate] - TBD - Kourou
2036 - Hydroterra+ [Earth Explorer 12 candidate] - TBD - Kourou
2036 - Keystone [Earth Explorer 12 candidate] - TBD - Kourou
2030's - test flight - Ariane Next (Ariane 7) - Kourou
2030's - ESA crew spacecraft - TBD - Kourou
NLT 2040 - GAIA-2 - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Pléiades Neo Next constellation - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Sentinel-1B 2nd Gen - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Sentinel-1C 2nd Gen - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Sentinel-2B 2nd Gen - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Sentinel-3B 2nd Gen - TBD - Kourou
TBD - GOCE-FO - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Seosat-Ingenio-2 - TBD - Kourou
TBD - TBD - Spectrum (Isar) - Kourou ELD

Rideshare:
2020s - VNREDSat-1b - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - NaSPUoN-0GPM2030 - Vega C - Kourou ELV
TBD - GESat constellation [Absolut Sensing] - TBD - Kourou
TBD - GEI-Sat constellation [Satlantis] - TBD - Kourou
TBD - constellr constellation - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Aerospacelab constellation - TBD - Kourou
TBD - OroraTech constellation - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Aistech constellation - TBD - Kourou
TBD - ERMIS-1, ERMIS-2 - TBD - Kourou
TBD - ERMIS-3 - TBD - Kourou

Statistics:

Orbital launches from Hammaguir - 4 (Diamant A - 4)
Orbital launches from CSG - 320 (Diamant B - 5, Europa II - 1, Diamant BP.4 - 3, Ariane 1 - 11, Ariane 2 - 6, Ariane 3 - 11, Ariane 4 - 116, Ariane 5 - 117, Soyuz ST - 27, Vega/Vega С - 23/2)

Satellites from Hammaguir (launched / delivered to orbit) - 4 / 4
Satellites from CSG (launched / delivered to orbit)[/color] - 709 / 679

Acronyms:
ALINA - Autonomous Landing and Navigation Module
ALTIUS - Atmospheric Limb Tracker for Investigation of the Upcoming Stratosphere
ARIEL - Atmospheric Remote‐sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large‐survey
ARRAKIHS - Analysis of Resolved Remnants of Accreted galaxies as a Key Instrument for Halo Surveys
ASAP-S - Arianespace System for Auxiliary Payloads for Soyuz rocket
ATHENA - Advanced Telescope for High-ENergy Astrophysics
AWS - Arctic Weather Satellite
BIOMASS - Biomass monitoring mission for Carbon Assessment
CHIME - Copernicus Hyperspectral Imaging Mission for the Environment
CIMR - Copernicus Imaging Microwave Radiometer
CLTV - Cis-Lunar Transfer Vehicle
CM - Carrier Module (Exomars)
CO2M - Copernicus Anthropogenic Carbon Dioxide Monitoring
Comsat-NG - Communication par Satellite de Nouvelle Génération
CRISTAL - Copernicus Polar Ice and Snow Topography Altimeter
CSG - COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation
CSO - Composante Spatiale Optique
CURIE - CubeSat Radio Interferometry Experiment
EL3 - European Large Logistic Lander
ERO - Earth Return Orbiter
ESP-MACCS - Earth System Processes Monitored in the Atmosphere by a Constellation of CubeSats
FLEX - Fluorescence Explorer satellite
FORUM - Far-infrared Outgoing Radiation Understanding and Monitoring
G2G - Galileo Second Generation
GAIA-2 - Global Astrometric Interferometer for Astrophysics-2
GTO - Geostationary Transfer Orbit
GEO - Geosynchronous Equatorial Orbit
GRACE-C - Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment-Continuity
HRWS-X - High Resolution Wide Swath SAR system for earth observation in X-Band
IFD 2 - In-Flight Demonstrator (two stage to orbit)
ION-SVC - In Orbit Now - Satellite Carrier Vehicle
IOS-OSPM - In Orbit Servicing Operating Support & Propulsion Module
IRIS² - Infrastructure for Resilience, Interconnectivity and Security by Satellite
LISA - Laser Interferometer Space Antenna
LSTM - Land Surface Temperature Monitoring
LUMIO - LUnar Meteoroid Impacts Observer
MERLIN - MEthane Remote sensing LIdar missioN
MLS - Multi Launch System
NAOS - National Advanced Optical System
NEOMIR - Near Earth Object Mission in the Infra-Red
NESS – Nanosat 3U for Surveillance of the civilian Spectrum
PLATO - PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars
PoC - Proof of Concept
PRETTY - Passive Reflectometry and Dosimetry
RACE - Rendezvous Autonomous Cubesats Experiment
ROSE-C - Radar Observing System for Europe - C-Band
ROSE-L - Radar Observing System for Europe - L-Band
RSP - Rover and Surface Platform (Exomars)
SKIM - Sea-surface Kinematics Multiscale monitoring
SMILE - Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer
SR-E - Space Rider-Evolution
SSO - Sun Synchronous Orbit
SSMS - Small Spacecraft Mission Service
SUSIE - Smart Upper Stage for Innovative Exploration
TANGO - Twin ANthropogenic Greenhouse Gas Observers
TRUTHS - Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial- and Helio- Studies
VEnUS - VEGA Electric Nudge Upper Stage
VMMO - Volatile and Mineralogy Mapping Orbiter
YODA - Yeux en Orbite pour un Démonstrateur Agile

Changes on June 29th
Changes on July 5th
Changes on July 6th
« Last Edit: 07/10/2024 04:44 am by Salo »

Offline Salo

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2847 on: 06/29/2024 11:57 am »
https://database.eohandbook.com/database/missionsummary.aspx?missionID=577
Quote
Full Name    Sentinel-1 C    
Status    Approved
Mission Agencies    ESA, COM
Launch Date    Dec 2024

https://space.oscar.wmo.int/satellites/view/sentinel_2d
Quote
Satellite: Sentinel-2D
...
Launch    ≥2028

https://database.eohandbook.com/database/missionsummary.aspx?missionID=920
Quote
Full Name    Sentinel-2 D
Mission Agencies    ESA  , COM
Launch Date    Sep 2028

https://database.eohandbook.com/database/missionsummary.aspx?missionID=1404
Quote
PRISMA2GEN
Full Name    PRecursore IperSpettrale della Missione Applicativa Second Generation aka PSG
Mission Agencies    ASI
Launch Date    Dec 2027

https://space.oscar.wmo.int/satellites/view/merlin
Quote
Satellite: MERLIN
...
Launch    ≥2028

https://database.eohandbook.com/database/missionsummary.aspx?missionID=678
Quote
MERLIN
Full Name    Methane Remote Sensing Lidar Mission aka D/F Climate Mission
Mission Agencies    CNES, DLR
Launch Date    Feb 2028
« Last Edit: 06/29/2024 03:35 pm by Salo »

Offline Salo

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2848 on: 06/29/2024 12:32 pm »
https://www.eumetsat.int/planned-launches
Quote
Sentinel-3C      -  Jul 2025-Sep 2025
MetOp-SG A1    -  Sep 2025-Nov 2025
MetOp-SG B1    -  Jun 2026-Aug 2026
MTG-I2            -  Jul 2026-Sep 2026
CO2M-A           -  Oct 2026-Dec 2026
CO2M-B           -  Jan 2027-Mar 2027
Sentinel-3D      -  Jan 2028-Dec 2028
CRISTAL-A        -  Oct 2028-Dec 2028
CO2M-C           -  Apr 2029-Jun 2029
CIMR-A            -  Jul 2029-Sep 2029
« Last Edit: 06/29/2024 12:41 pm by Salo »

Online JSz

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2849 on: 06/29/2024 12:55 pm »
https://www.eumetsat.int/meteosat-satellite-be-launched-spacex
Quote
28 June 2024

During the Council meeting which took place on 26-27 June 2024 the EUMETSAT member states, in line with the organisation’s convention, reiterated their support to European industrial technologies and the objective to maintain an independent access to space for Europe.

MTG-S1 is a unique masterpiece of European technology. This first European sounding satellite in a geostationary orbit will bring a revolution for weather forecasting and climate monitoring in Europe and Africa, and make it possible, for the first time, to observe the full lifecycle of a convective storm from space. Its launch will ensure that national weather services can benefit from new and more accurate data to protect lives, properties and infrastructures.

As such, the EUMETSAT member states decided to award a launch service contract to SpaceX for the launch of the Meteosat Third Generation-Sounder 1 (MTG-S1) satellite on a Falcon 9 rocket in 2025.

“This decision was driven by exceptional circumstances” explains EUMETSAT Director-General Phil Evans. “It does not compromise our standard policy of supporting European partners, and we look forward to a successful SpaceX launch for this masterpiece of European technology.”

Publications and commentaries on this topic will follow. An article by Eric Berger has just been published: https://arstechnica.com/space/2024/06/mere-days-before-its-debut-the-ariane-6-rocket-loses-a-key-customer-to-spacex/.

European solidarity is, as usual, very selective.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2850 on: 06/29/2024 04:24 pm »
Afaik Eumetsat had 5 launches planned for between 2020 and 2027.
One launch had taken place MTG-I1 on Ariane 5.
They ordered Ariane 6 launches for MTG-S1 and MTG-I2.
And for Metop SG-A1 and -B1 Eumetsat ordered two Soyuz-ST-B launches with the option for another Soyuz launch.
Soyuz became unavailable because of sanctions imposed on Russia because they invaded Ukraine.
Ariane 6 is likely to become operation about 3,5 years late.
So if I'm not mistaken during the Eumetsat conference they approved launching MetopSG on Ariane 6. But MTG-S1 will no longer be launched by Ariane 6, with the only reliable and available option SpaceX Falcon9 being chosen instead.
I think this must be viewed as a net one launch gain for Ariane 6, instead of only losing the MTG-S1 launch.
What could have been the primary GTO satellites for the launch besides MTG-S1?
I can't identify a payload to match.

The duo IS-41 & IS-44 is likely to heavy.
IS-45 is a year later.
EUTELSAT diverted all the five payloads to SpaceX. If I'm not mistaken they have no payload planed until 2026.
The GTO rideshare mission is probably to risky for satellite as important as MTG-S1


Offline GWR64

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2851 on: 06/30/2024 09:41 am »
Afaik Eumetsat had 5 launches planned for between 2020 and 2027.
One launch had taken place MTG-I1 on Ariane 5.
They ordered Ariane 6 launches for MTG-S1 and MTG-I2.
And for Metop SG-A1 and -B1 Eumetsat ordered two Soyuz-ST-B launches with the option for another Soyuz launch.
Soyuz became unavailable because of sanctions imposed on Russia because they invaded Ukraine.
Ariane 6 is likely to become operation about 3,5 years late.
So if I'm not mistaken during the Eumetsat conference they approved launching MetopSG on Ariane 6. But MTG-S1 will no longer be launched by Ariane 6, with the only reliable and available option SpaceX Falcon9 being chosen instead.
I think this must be viewed as a net one launch gain for Ariane 6, instead of only losing the MTG-S1 launch.
What could have been the primary GTO satellites for the launch besides MTG-S1?
I can't identify a payload to match.

The duo IS-41 & IS-44 is likely to heavy.
IS-45 is a year later.
EUTELSAT diverted all the five payloads to SpaceX. If I'm not mistaken they have no payload planed until 2026.
The GTO rideshare mission is probably to risky for satellite as important as MTG-S1

Intelsat has booked a dedicated A64 launch for IS41 + IS44.
https://www.arianespace.com/press-release/arianespace-ariane-6-to-launch-intelsat-satellites/
Intelsat-45 is a micro GEO satellite.
https://swissto12.com/intelsat-chooses-swissto12-to-build-intelsat-45/
That leaves Optus-11, Airbus Onesat, ~3000 kg. But also delayed.

Coincidence? Some time ago the first Kuiper launches were changed from 2 Ariane 64 to 2 Ariane 62.
But someone will have to make the start with the A64.
« Last Edit: 06/30/2024 09:58 am by GWR64 »

Offline Salo

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2852 on: 06/30/2024 04:25 pm »
https://spacenews.com/eumetsat-moves-weather-satellite-from-ariane-6-to-falcon-9/
Quote
Arianespace has an order book of 30 Ariane 6 launches, said Caroline Arnoux, head of Ariane 6 programs at Arianespace, at a June 25 ESA briefing. That includes 18 launches of Project Kuiper satellites for Amazon, along with other commercial and government customers.

She said Arianespace envisioned six Ariane 6 launches in 2025, increasing to eight in 2026 and 10 in 2027. The vehicle’s maximum flight rate is projected to be 9 to 12 launches a year.

Offline bolun

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2853 on: 07/05/2024 11:40 am »
July 05, 2024

ESA COUNCIL DECISIONS SET THE STAGE FOR MORE DIVERSE EUROPEAN LAUNCH SERVICES

ESA Council adopted today a resolution on European launch services and on the continuity of European access to space, that sets the way for the ESA-developed Vega launcher to be commercialised by its prime contractor, Avio.

The Vega launchers joined the ESA-developed launchers family with its first flight in 2012 and started commercial exploitation in 2015. Vega-C, a more powerful version of Vega with a larger fairing made its debut in 2022. Both variants are built under the responsibility of prime contractor Avio and have been exploited by Arianespace.

“ESA Member States are finalising the changes needed to the framework governing the exploitation of ESA-developed launchers to allow for Avio to become Vega launch service provider, ‘says Toni Tolker-Nielsen, ESA Director of Space Transportation, ”With today’s decisions, ESA Member States are ensuring continuity while allowing Avio to market the Vega launch services from now on.”

Today’s Resolution follows from a Resolution adopted by ESA Council in Seville on 6 November 2023 that called upon ESA Member States and the Director General to initiate a review of the legal framework governing the exploitation of ESA-developed launchers with the objective that Avio could become the operator and launch service provider of Vega as soon as possible.

Arianespace and Avio have agreed that Arianespace will remain the launch service provider and operator for Vega/Vega-C launch services until Vega flight 29 (VV29), scheduled for the fourth quarter of 2025.

For Vega-C launches following VV29, the customers who have already contracted with Arianespace will be offered the possibility to transfer their contracts to Avio as the new launch service provider and sole operator of Vega.

Arianespace will primarily focus with ArianeGroup on the Ariane 6 exploitation to best meet the customer needs.

“A new step has been taken in the implementation of the decisions taken at the Seville space summit: Arianespace is carrying out the next six missions of the Vega launcher before handing over to its partner Avio. We will work with ESA and Avio to make this transition a success in the interests of our customers. The Arianespace teams are in the starting blocks to prepare with ArianeGroup the operation and ramp-up of the Ariane 6 launcher,” declared Stéphane Israël, CEO of Arianespace.

“We welcome the steps taken by the European Space Agency for the evolution of the governance of the launcher sector in Europe and are excited to start Vega-C commercial activities in support to customers with full commitment and dedication,” said Giulio Ranzo, CEO of Avio.

Ensuring access to space

Today’s Resolution includes the definition of what constitutes a “European launch service”. This is key to ensure European autonomous access to space and includes considerations on the nationality of the launch service provider and location of the launcher system development, manufacturing and launch operations.

Finally, ESA Council also authorised the use of Europe’s Spaceport launch range in French Guiana by four micro- and mini-launchers from European launch service providers Isar Aerospace, MaiaSpace, PLD Space and Rocket Factory Augsburg (RFA).

These decisions set the stage for more diverse European launch services in an increasingly competitive environment.

https://newsroom.arianespace.com/esa-council-decisions-set-the-stage-for-more-diverse-european-launch-services/

Offline Salo

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2854 on: 07/05/2024 08:06 pm »
https://www.airbus.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2024-07-airbus-awarded-german-armed-forces-prime-contract-for-military
Quote
Munich, 04 July 2024 – Germany’s armed forces, the Bundeswehr, has awarded Airbus the SATCOMBw 3 prime contract for the next generation secure military satellite system which includes geostationary satellites as well as ground segment, launch and operation for 15 years. The spacecraft are due to be deployed before the end of the decade and the contract value amounts to €2.1 billion.

Offline Salo

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2855 on: 07/06/2024 01:37 pm »
https://www.esa.int/Enabling_Support/Space_Transportation/Ariane/Ariane_6_launch_how_to_watch_and_what_to_look_out_for
Quote
Ariane 6 is scheduled to launch on 9 July 2024, with a launch window from 15:00-19:00 local time at Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana (19:00–23:00 BST, 9 July 20:00–10 July 00:00 CEST).

Offline Salo

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2856 on: 07/06/2024 02:48 pm »
https://www.esa.int/Applications/Observing_the_Earth/Altius
Quote
Altius

ESA's ozone mission
Altius

The mission

The Atmospheric Limb Tracker for Investigation of the Upcoming Stratosphere (Altius) mission carries a high-resolution spectral imager and uses a limb-sounding technique to deliver profiles of ozone and other trace gases in the upper atmosphere to support services such as weather forecasting, and to monitor long-term trends. Altius is developed within ESA’s Earth Watch programme and financed mainly by Belgium with contributions from Canada, Luxembourg and Romania.
The launch

Date: 2026
Site: Kourou, French Guiana
Rocket: Vega-C

https://space.oscar.wmo.int/satellites/view/flex
Quote
Satellite: FLEX
Satellite details
Acronym    FLEX
Full name    FLuorescence EXplorer
...
Launch    Apr 2026

https://database.eohandbook.com/database/missionsummary.aspx?missionID=836
Quote
FLEX
Full Name    FLuorescence EXplorer    
Status    Approved
Mission Agencies    ESA
Launch Date    Mar 2026

Offline bolun

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2857 on: 07/07/2024 07:38 am »

Planned launches:
Date - Satellite(s) - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

2030
TBD - ERO [Mars Sample Return] - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4

ERO - Earth Return Orbiter

https://www.esa.int/Science_Exploration/Human_and_Robotic_Exploration/Earth_Return_Orbiter_the_first_round-trip_to_Mars

Quote
Earth Return Orbiter – the first round-trip to Mars

Quote
Quick facts

-Main job: Find and capture a sample capsule in Mars orbit and return it to Earth
- Launch date: No earlier than 2027
- Launch vehicle: Ariane 64
- Launch site: Kourou, French Guiana
- Arrival to Mars: 2029
- Arrival to Mars operational orbit: 2030, 325 km above Mars surface
« Last Edit: 07/07/2024 07:41 am by bolun »

Offline Salo

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2858 on: 07/08/2024 05:21 am »
https://spaceflightnow.com/2024/04/16/nasa-requests-proposals-to-reduce-cost-timeline-of-mars-sample-return-mission/
Quote
Spaceflight Now reached out to see if those contracts are still in place and are waiting to hear back. The MSR IRB-2 Review Team (MIRT), which was formed to respond to the IRB-2 assessment, had a written recommendation was to launch the ERO/CCRS with ESA in 2030 and and to launch the Sample Retrieval Lander (SRL)/MAV in 2035.
During a teleconference with members of the press, Fox said that 2030 is a possible launch date for the ERO/CCRS, but that’s not a hard and fast date, noting it could change “when we see the results of the architecture studies.”

Offline Salo

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #2859 on: 07/10/2024 03:38 am »
https://newsroom.arianespace.com/europes-new-ariane-6-rocket-powers-into-space-54117/
Quote
July 09, 2024
Europe's new Ariane 6 rocket powers into space

Europe's new heavy-lift rocket, Ariane 6, made its inaugural flight from Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana at 16:00 local time on 9 July (+4  20:00 time BST, +5 21:00 time CEST).

Ariane 6 is the latest in Europe's Ariane rocket series, taking over from Ariane 5, and featuring a modular and versatile design that can launch missions from low-Earth orbit and farther out into deep space.

"A completely new rocket is not launched often, and success is far from guaranteed. I am privileged to have witnessed this historic moment when Europe's new generation of the Ariane family lifted off – successfully – effectively reinstating European access to space,” said ESA's Director General Josef Aschbacher.

"An inaugural launch is a huge undertaking from thousands of people who have worked relentlessly for years. To see it perform wonderfully at the first attempt is testament to their dedication and a demonstration of European excellence in engineering and technology. Heartfelt thanks go to the teams at ESA, CNES, ArianeGroup and Arianespace for their hard work to get to this point. I also want to sincerely thank our Member States for having enabled and supported the Ariane 6 programme along the way. Not always easy, but the endurance shown has paid off handsomely today."

This inaugural flight, designated VA262, is a demonstration flight whose aim is to show the capabilities and prowess of Ariane 6 in escaping Earth's gravity and operating in space. Nevertheless, it had several passengers on board.

At 21:06 BST, 22:06 CEST, one hour after liftoff, the first set of satellites on board Ariane 6 were released from the upper stage and placed into an orbit 600 km above Earth. Satellites and experiments from various space agencies, companies, research institutes, universities and young professionals were included on this inaugural flight.

In addition to the rocket, the liftoff demonstrated the functioning of the launch pad and operations on the ground at Europe's Spaceport. The new custom-built dedicated launch zone was built by France's space agency CNES and allows for a faster turnover of Ariane launches.

On the occasion of the launch, Philippe Baptiste, CEO of CNES, said: “With this first successful launch by Ariane 6, Europe has finally recovered its capacity to access space. Beyond the great emotion I am feeling right now, my first thoughts are for all the teams in Kourou, Paris, Vernon, Les Mureaux, Toulouse, Bremen, Lampoldshausen, Liège, Barcelona, Colleferro, Zürich and everywhere else in Europe who made this success possible. I would like to acknowledge the commitment of the employees of CNES, ESA, ArianeGroup, Arianespace and our subcontractors. The last few months have been intense, and I would like to thank them all. Europe can be proud of its space programme, Europe can be proud of its knowledge and expertise. Together, let's prepare the future of launchers and space.”

Ariane 6 was built by prime contractor and design authority ArianeGroup. “With the successful first flight of Ariane 6, the European space industry has moved into a new era,” said Martin Sion, CEO of ArianeGroup. “This historic launch demonstrates the unfailing commitment of our teams and partners, whom I would like to thank warmly for this success, which reflects on the entire European industry. Seeing Europe’s new launcher lift off into space marks the culmination of an outstanding technical and technological adventure, and the beginning of a long history of Ariane 6 operations. The next flight models are already in production and the stages of the second model will be shipped to the Guiana Space Centre this autumn for the first commercial flight of Ariane 6.”

Next: tech demos, controlled deorbit and capsule separation

With the placement of satellites into orbit, Ariane 6 has demonstrated that it can successfully launch its payloads into space, but ground control has more in store for its inaugural flight. Over the next hour, Ariane 6's upper stage will show again that it can restart its Vinci engine using the novel auxiliary propulsion unit. This restart capability will allow Ariane 6 to drop off multiple passengers into different orbits on future flights and deorbit itself through Earth’s atmosphere at the end of its mission, to ensure it does not become space debris.

On this flight the Ariane 6 upper stage is set to release two reentry capsules as it enters Earth's atmosphere for a clean disposal to burn up harmlessly, leaving no space debris in orbit.

The next Ariane 6 is planned for launch this year on its first commercial flight under Arianespace as operator and launch service provider. “The success of this first flight marks the start of Ariane 6’s operational career, giving Europe an autonomous access to space,” added Stéphane Israël, CEO of Arianespace. “The new launcher’s order book is proof of the versatility of Ariane 6 and of its capacity to accomplish a wide range of missions into multiple orbits. It reflects the confidence that customers have in Ariane 6 for both their institutional and commercial missions. We are eager to begin operating our new launcher.”

 

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