Author Topic: Expedition 70 Thread  (Read 134474 times)

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #500 on: 12/01/2023 10:11 pm »
Crew Awaits Sunday Cargo Delivery, Works Bioprinting and DNA Extraction

Mark Garcia Posted on December 1, 2023

A cargo craft is in orbit today on its way to the International Space Station following its Friday morning launch. Meanwhile, advanced space biology is underway aboard the orbital outpost to improve life on Earth and in space.

The Roscosmos 86 space freighter is in Earth orbit and racing toward the space station after launching at 4:25 a.m. EDT today from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The Progress 86 is on a two-day delivery mission carrying nearly 5,600 pounds of cargo to resupply the Expedition 70 crew. Cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Nikolai Chub will be on duty Sunday morning monitoring the cargo craft’s automated docking to the Poisk module planned for 6:14 a.m.

Both cosmonauts, including Flight Engineer Konstantin Borisov, had a light-duty day at the end of the week. The trio spent Friday morning cleaning ventilation systems throughout the station’s Roscosmos segment then relaxed during the afternoon. Borisov will assist his cosmonaut coworkers on Sunday photographing the docking activities and deconfiguring docking gear after the vehicle’s arrival.

Bioprinting and DNA extraction were the main research activities on Friday as astronauts Jasmin Moghbeli  and Satoshi Furukawa contributed to scientific knowledge advancing health for humans living on and off the Earth. Moghbeli from NASA kicked off her day in the Columbus laboratory module swapping cleaning syringes inside the BioFabrication Facility (BFF), a biological printer. Next, she removed a tissue cassette containing printed cardiac tissue samples from the BFF. The cassette was then installed into an advanced sample processor that can be configured for a variety of biological and physics investigations.

Furukawa from JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) spent Friday working in the Kibo laboratory module extracting DNA samples for the new uTitan investigation. He stowed those samples in a science freezer for later analysis to help researchers explore a method for automated nucleic acid extraction in microgravity. The method may inform DNA sample processing and sequencing techniques on spacecraft and remote locations on Earth.

NASA astronaut Loral O’Hara worked out in the Destiny laboratory module for an exercise study observing physical fitness in microgravity. She pedaled on an exercise cycle wearing breathing gear and sensors for the long-running study measuring a crew member’s aerobic and cardiovascular conditioning.

Commander Andreas Mogensen stowed the exercise cycle after O’Hara’s workout session and assisted Moghbeli as she serviced the printed cardiac tissue samples. Mogensen from ESA (European Space Agency) then spent the afternoon collecting microbe samples from station surfaces for incubation and analysis. O’Hara also worked in the afternoon collecting station air samples for microbial analysis.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2023/12/01/crew-awaits-sunday-cargo-delivery-works-bioprinting-and-dna-extraction/

The Roscosmos Progress 86 cargo craft ascends to Earth orbit after launching from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Credit: NASA TV

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #501 on: 12/02/2023 02:08 am »
International Space Station
@Space_Station
This week on #SpaceToGround, one cargo craft departs as another launches. Plus, learn about upgrades the Exp 70 crew is making to station facilities, including the Cold Atom Lab. 🚀🧊

https://twitter.com/Space_Station/status/1730738551732777340


Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #502 on: 12/02/2023 04:11 am »
The great Ipad hunt.  Today Jaws called down saying her Ipad had floated away and she couldn't find it.  I think this was her backup because the primary died and is being replaced Monday.  She asked CAPCOM if there was a "find my Ipad app".  "Unfortunately no" was the answer.  The ground folks then used network connectivity to station WiFi routers to give Jaws an area to look in.  She called down later saying their work paid off when she found it.  CAPCOM then commented that MCC-H now had a "find the lost Ipad" procedure and qualification...
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #503 on: 12/02/2023 03:57 pm »
NASA Marshall
@NASA_Marshall
One rep at a time! 🏋️

Astronauts aboard the @Space_Station exercise for about two hours a day to prevent atrophy - the loss of bone and muscle due to living in microgravity.

Learn about the research @NASA is doing to keep crews healthy during missions >> https://go.nasa.gov/3T18qJH

https://twitter.com/NASA_Marshall/status/1730663131091730704


Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #504 on: 12/02/2023 10:47 pm »
Gravitics
@GraviticsInc
Boeing is testing a new antimicrobial coating on the International Space Station (ISS) to protect crew members and spacecraft systems from harmful microbes. The coating is designed to kill bacteria and viruses and will be tested on various surfaces throughout the ISS. The results of the experiment could have implications for future space missions and for use in high-traffic areas on Earth.  #SpaceStationSaturday

https://twitter.com/GraviticsInc/status/1731015377562505666

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #505 on: 12/03/2023 12:13 pm »
Progress Docks to Station, Replenishes Crew

Abby Graf Posted on December 3, 2023

An uncrewed Roscosmos Progress 86 spacecraft arrived at the International Space Station’s Poisk module at 6:18 a.m. EST. The spacecraft launched on a Soyuz rocket at 4:25 a.m. EST Friday, Dec. 1 (2:25 p.m. Baikonur time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Progress is delivering almost three tons of food, fuel and supplies to the International Space Station for the Expedition 70 crew.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2023/12/03/progress-docks-to-station-replenishes-crew/

Dec. 3, 2023: International Space Station Configuration. Six spaceships are parked at the space station including the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft, the SpaceX Dragon Endurance crew spacecraft, Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus space freighter, the Soyuz MS-24 crew ship, and the Progress 85 and 86 resupply ships.

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #506 on: 12/03/2023 05:23 pm »
NASA is tracking a possible debris conjunction at 0711Z tomorrow.  PDAM would be at 0430 if necessary.  Tracking will be updated overnight.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #507 on: 12/03/2023 06:49 pm »
Anatoly Zak
@RussianSpaceWeb
Progress MS-25 docks at the #ISS under manual control of the crew:

NASA: Retraction of the docking probe and closure of the hooks in the docking mechanism between Progress and ISS is confirmed after contact and capture, even though mission control in Korolev is not displaying milestones in the docking process as usual:
https://www.russianspaceweb.com/progress-ms-25.html

Progress MS-25 resupplies the ISS

The sixth and final Russian launch to the ISS in 2023 sent around 2.5 tons of cargo for Expedition 70 aboard the International Space Station, ISS. Progress MS-25 lifted off from Baikonur in Kazakhstan on December 1 and docked at the outpost on December 3 under manual control of the station crew due to problems with the automated rendezvous system. It was also the fourth Russian cargo vehicle travelling to the ISS in 2023.

https://twitter.com/RussianSpaceWeb/status/1731273715281781148

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #508 on: 12/03/2023 06:56 pm »
Andreas Mogensen
@Astro_Andreas
The tip of the iceberg

I have to admit that if you had asked me before this mission, if you could see icebergs with your naked eye from space, I would have said, “No way”.

Turns out that you can! We have been seeing lots of icebergs lately in the south Atlantic. Perhaps it’s their distinct geometry or perhaps the contrast in color, but they are very visible from space.

Seeing the icebergs float around reminds me of climate change, with glaciers melting at a rapid pace and rising sea levels. Places like the Maldives will most likely not exist in 70 years from now, having been submerged by the rising ocean.

#WhatYouLoveYouWillProtect #EarthFromSpace #Huginn

https://twitter.com/Astro_Andreas/status/1731297958014992688


Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #509 on: 12/03/2023 07:03 pm »
Katya Pavlushchenko
@katlinegrey
According to the insiders, the cause of the switch to the manual docking mode of #ProgressMS25 was a problem with the Kurs system.

https://twitter.com/katlinegrey/status/1731316585720156313

Online Yellowstone10

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #510 on: 12/04/2023 02:35 pm »
We've got an internal camera view on the YouTube stream at the moment - Andreas Mogensen is doing some work on one of the suits in the Quest Airlock.

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #511 on: 12/04/2023 05:00 pm »
Space Station Crew Talks with Fox Weather, WCBS Newsradio 880, New York



Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #512 on: 12/04/2023 05:10 pm »
Expedition 70 Astronaut Andreas Mogensen Answers European Student Questions - Dec. 4, 2023



Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #513 on: 12/04/2023 05:23 pm »
International Space Station
@Space_Station
Worldwide cooperation.
 
The International Space Station is the world’s premiere orbital laboratory and represents the work of people and organizations representing 15 nations. The worldwide team works daily to operate and upgrade its capabilities.

https://twitter.com/Space_Station/status/1731704921316315551


Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #514 on: 12/04/2023 05:30 pm »
Expedition 70 Space Station Crew Talks with KHOU-TV Houston and Houston Chronicle - Dec. 4, 2023


« Last Edit: 12/05/2023 03:09 pm by ddspaceman »

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #515 on: 12/04/2023 06:18 pm »
Loral O'Hara
@lunarloral
Juan de Nova Island, in the Mozambique Channel between Madagascar and Mozambique. Or to me, “Jellyfish Island.”

https://twitter.com/lunarloral/status/1731710874459460078


Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #516 on: 12/04/2023 06:23 pm »
Jasmin Moghbeli
@AstroJaws
A few days ago, I posted photos I had taken of the previous Progress cargo vehicle that had just departed from @Space_Station. Yesterday, I took these photos of Progress MS-25 arriving. Congrats, @roscosmos for a successful docking!

https://twitter.com/AstroJaws/status/1731720162653425724

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #517 on: 12/04/2023 09:23 pm »
Space Research, Cargo Craft Operations Kick Off Week

Mark Garcia Posted on December 4, 2023

Science hardware, microbiology, and eye checks topped the research schedule aboard the International Space Station on Monday. The Expedition 70 crew also serviced a spacesuit and began unpacking a new cargo craft.

NASA astronauts Loral O’Hara and Jasmin Moghbeli took turns working in the Life Science Glovebox on Monday morning. O’Hara first disconnected cables and cameras that record activities inside the biology research facility located in the Kibo laboratory module. Moghbeli then swapped out the gloves that crew members wear when conducting science operations inside the device.

O’Hara also configured and stowed hardware supporting a space physics experiment that observes how microgravity affects the properties of metal alloys. Moghbeli inoculated cell samples for the Bacteria Adhesion and Corrosion study that is exploring how to identify and disinfect microbes that can contaminate spacecraft systems and affect crew heath.

Astronaut Satoshi Furukawa started his day servicing a pair of science freezers before cleaning and connecting cables that support a 3D organ culture study. Furukawa from JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) then joined the NASA duo for eye exams at the end of the day with support from doctors on the ground. O’Hara operated the standard medical imaging gear viewing the optic nerves and retinas of Furukawa and Moghbeli.

Commander Andreas Mogensen of ESA (European Space Agency) reviewed procedures for an upcoming study to manufacture superior fiber optic cables in microgravity. Afterward, he uninstalled components on a spacesuit and prepared them for return to Earth aboard the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft.

Roscosmos cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Nikolai Chub began Monday unpacking the Progress 86 space freighter that docked to the Poisk module at 6:18 a.m. EST. on Sunday. Kononenko unloaded a new space biology experiment delivered inside the Progress and installed its egg samples inside a Nauka science module incubator. Chub worked on and photographed docking hardware inside Poisk. Flight Engineer Konstantin Borisov updated data files documenting operations with the newly docked vehicle.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2023/12/04/space-research-cargo-craft-operations-kick-off-week/

A waning gibbous moon sets just beyond Earth’s horizon in this photograph from the space station soared above the South Pacific Ocean.

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #518 on: 12/05/2023 02:42 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/01/2023

Bill Keeter Posted on December 1, 2023

86 Progress (86P) Launch: This morning at 3:25 AM CT, 86P launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome carrying food, fuel, and supplies to the ISS. An automated docking to the ISS MRM-2 Zenith docking port will occur on Sunday, December 3rd at approximately 5:15 AM CT after completing a 34-orbit rendezvous.

Payloads:

Four Bed CO2 (4BCO2) Scrubber: CO2 effluent and humidity sampling was taken from the 4BCO2 scrubber. 4BCO2 Scrubber demonstrates a technology for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere on a spacecraft. The technology is based on the current system in use on the ISS with mechanical upgrades in absorption beds, heater elements, and valves and use of an improved zeolite absorbent to reduce erosion and dust formation. A goal for next-generation systems is continuous operation for 20,000 hours without a failure, and this technology is a step toward that goal.

BioFabrication Facility (BFF): The BFF overnight print attempt was not successful, and the crew performed cleaning ops and a replacement of the cassette and syringes in preparation of another attempt. Using 3D biological printers to produce usable human organs has long been a dream of scientists and doctors around the globe; however, printing the tiny, complex structures found inside human organs, such as capillary structures, has proven difficult to accomplish in Earth’s gravity environment. To overcome this challenge, Techshot designed their BFF experiment to print organ-like tissues in microgravity, acting as a steppingstone in a long-term plan to manufacture whole human organs in space using refined biological 3D printing techniques.

Nucleic Acid Extraction System (µTitan): Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was pipetted into cartridges and samples were extracted and then placed into cold stowage along with preserve yeast for return. µTitan is an instrument used to isolate DNA from various samples in microgravity. Methods exist for sequencing DNA on the ISS, but no methods currently exist to extract DNA from a sample in space or the ISS. This technology could provide a tool for crew members on the space station to sequence DNA to answer health-related questions and identify microbial content in samples.

Systems:

Advanced Resisitive Exercise Device (ARED) Detent Plate Rotation and Adjustment: The crew rotated and adjusted the ARED detent plates to restore full functionality.  ARED uses adjustable resistance piston-driven vacuum cylinders along with a flywheel system to simulate free-weight exercises in normal gravity.  Without exercises like those performed on the ARED, astronauts could lose up to 15% of their muscle volume.  ARED’s primary goal is to maintain muscle strength and mass in astronauts during long periods in space.

Health Maintenance System (HMS) ISS EveryWear (EVW) Medication and Nutrition Tracking: The crew recorded daily nutrition and medication intake. EVW is an application on the crew’s personal tablets which connects to remote “wearable” sensors built into intelligent clothing. The program allows for extensive physiology data collection for both science research and medical follow-up purposes. This data will used for current ISS crew provision and exercise planning, as well as providing a better understanding of Human Spaceflight in general.

Photo/TV Port 4A Mast Survey Imagery and Survey Teardown: The crew completed the ISS Roll Out Solar Array (IROSA) and Solar Array Wing (SAW) survey began yesterday by taking HD photos of the Port 4A SAW mast.  Afterwords, the D5 cameras were removed from the Cupola and returned to their previous configuration.  Micro Meteroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) present a potential risk to the solar arrays.  HD photography surveys must be routinely taken in order to determine current physical condition of SAW and IROSA structures. The SAWs are the main power generating systems of the ISS, producing electrical power from solar energy. IROSAs are new arrays installed on the already existing SAWs. They provide additional power to station as well as setup ISS for future commercial modules.

Microbial Air Sampler (MAS) Kit and Surface Sample Kit (SSK) Sample Collection: Today, the crew took air and surface samples onboard the ISS for microbial analysis.  Air samples were taken using the MAS with Petri Dishes.  The air samples were taken in the Lab, Node 1, Node 2, Node 3, COL, and JPM.  Surface samples were then taken using media slides for flat surfaces and swab tubes for non-flat surfaces. The surface samples were taken in the JPM, Columbus, the Lab, Node 1, Node 2, Node 3, and the PMM.

Completed Task List Activities:

Today’s Ground Activities:
All activities are complete unless otherwise noted.

    86P Launch

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #519 on: 12/05/2023 02:44 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/04/2023

Bill Keeter Posted on December 4, 2023

86 Progress (86P) Docking: Following the completion of a 34-orbit rendezvous, 86P successfully docked to the MRM-2 Zenith port on Sunday morning at 5:25 AM CT. The crew then performed leak checks, opened hatches, and began unloading cargo. Carrying food, fuel, and supplies, 86P launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on Friday, December 1st at 3:25 AM CT.

Payloads:

Astro Bit Public Affairs Office (PAO): The Astro Bit hardware was unstowed, batteries were inserted, and a functional check was performed in preparation of a PAO event. The hardware was stowed after the event. As part of Astro Bit initiative, students in Denmark and the other Scandinavian countries design an experiment that can also be repeated aboard the ISS with an interesting scientific outcome. The students program their own British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) micro: bit microcontrollers to implement their experiment and submit the resulting code, while being permitted to use a number of ISS common items, which are easily available on the space station as part of the experiment.

Bacterial Adhesion and Corrosion: Well BioCells (12) were inoculated inside the LSG. Polymicrobial Biofilm Growth and Control during Spaceflight (Bacterial Adhesion and Corrosion) explores the formation under microgravity conditions of multi-species biofilms, which may behave differently from single-species biofilms. This investigation identifies the bacterial genes used during biofilm growth, examines whether these biofilms can corrode stainless steel, and evaluates the effectiveness of a silver-based disinfectant. The microorganisms in biofilms can become resistant to traditional cleaning chemicals, leading to contamination of water treatment systems, damage to equipment, and potential health risks to astronauts.

Bio-Monitor: The crew assembled and donned the Bio-Monitor wearable hardware for a 48-hour recording session. Bio-Monitor is a Canadian onboard instrument that serves as a platform for scientific experiments on the ISS. The instrument performs on-orbit monitoring of crew member physiological parameters, with wearable sensors that only minimally interfere with crewmember daily activities.

Cold Atom Lab (CAL): The Cold Atom Lab Science Module 3 was stowed for return on SpX-29. The CAL produces clouds of atoms that are chilled to about one ten billionth of a degree above absolute zero — much colder than the average temperature of deep space. At these low temperatures, atoms have almost no motion, allowing scientists to study fundamental behaviors and quantum characteristics that are difficult or impossible to probe at higher temperatures. In microgravity, researchers may be able to achieve even colder temperatures than what is possible on the ground, and observe these cold atom clouds for longer periods of time.

ISS Ham Radio: An ISS Ham contact was made with Carl-Maria-von-Weber-Schule Eutin and Gymnasium in Loekamp, Eutin, and Marl, Germany. Since the earliest space station expeditions, ISS Ham Radio has allowed groups of students in schools, camps, museums, and planetariums to hold a conversation with the people living in space. As the ISS passes overhead, students have about nine minutes to ask crew members 10 to 20 questions.

Life Science Glovebox (LSG): The Glovebox USB Camera was disconnected and stowed. The LSG is a sealed work area that accommodates life science and technology investigations in a “workbench” type environment. Due to its larger size design, two crewmembers can work in LSG simultaneously.

Solid Combustion Experiment Module (SCEM): SCEM power and data cables were reconnected. The SCEM is designed to investigate the oxygen concentration required to sustain a flame over solid fuels  It is also possible to obtain the limiting electric current caused by self-ignition of the insulated wires due to short-circuit. Through studies using SCEM, combustion characteristics of solid materials in the microgravity environment where no buoyancy-induced convection occurs will be identified, as well as the effect of gravity on the combustion limit of solid materials.

Transparent Alloys: The Transparent Alloys Cartridge P11 connector was exchanged with the Protection Cover P11 connector in order to override a malfunctioning microswitch. The cartridge and hardware was then removed from the Microgravity Science Glovebox and stowed. This completes the SEBA3: Run_V007 experiment run. Transparent Alloys consists of numerous experiments to study various growth and solidification processes in alloys.

Systems:

Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) Transition: Ground teams implemented new algorithms to update protection of uplinked Space Station commands.  The new encryption protocol is Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS)-certified and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-approved.  This transition is necessary after previous three-key Triple Data Encryption Standard (3DES) became outdated.  After the transition, ground teams successfully checked out commanding capabilities.

Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) Water Recovery System (WRS) Sample Analysis and Data Record: The crew performed an analysis of the Water Processing Assembly (WPA) using the TOCA. The TOCA unit oxidizes organic carbon species present in the water to carbon dioxide gas and measures the concentration using nondispersive infrared spectroscopy. Analysis of the potable water using the TOCA occurs on a weekly basis.

Regenerative Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Recycle Tank Drain/Fill: The recycle tank was set up to drain via the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) Fill Drain Valve into a Brine EDV using the Urine Transfer System (UTS). Following the setup, the ground performed the tank drain using the UTS. Once the ground specialists completed the transfer, the crew verified the recycle tank was empty, terminated the drain, repositioned the fill/drain valve to force fill the recycle tank using UTS, and configured for nominal processing operations. The crew also swapped the EDV in the offload EDV spot of the UTS.

SpX-29 Cargo Transfer Operations: The crew continued transferring science and supplies to and from the SpaceX-29 cargo vehicle in support of science and ISS operations. SpaceX-29 will remain docked with the ISS until December.

Environmental Health System (EHS) Compound Specific Analyzer – Combustion Products (CSA-CP): Today, the crew replaced the battery packs in all CSA-CPs and calibrated the units. The CSA-CPs provide real-time readings following a combustion event and subsequent clean-up efforts. The CSA-CPs are also used for continuous monitoring of carbon monoxide levels in the ISS.

Health Maintenance System (HMS) Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT2) Exam: The crew completed routine OCT eye exams. OCT is an imaging technique analogous to ultrasound imaging that uses light instead of sound to capture micrometer-resolution, two- and three-dimensional images of tissue; in this case, the objects of interest are the crewmembers’ eyes. Eye exams are performed regularly on-board to monitor crewmembers’ eye health. Eyesight is one of the many aspects of the human body that may be affected by long-duration stays in a microgravity environment.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Operations: Today, the crew performed several EVA operations.  A failed HD Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Camera Assembly (HECA) was removed to be returned on SpX-29.  EMU Hard Upper Torso (HUT) S/N 2036 was boxed up and staged for return on SpX-29. EMU Lower Torso Assembly (LTA) S/N 2098 was disassembled, packed for return, and then replaced with the recently launched LTA S/N 2102.

Completed Task List Activities:

    Audio Headset Deploy

Today’s Ground Activities:
All activities are complete unless otherwise noted.

    AES Transition Operations

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