Author Topic: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone  (Read 439253 times)

Offline spacexplorer

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 577
  • italy
  • Liked: 313
  • Likes Given: 329
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1200 on: 10/19/2023 10:58 am »

Look back at the coverage of Spirit and Opportunity. When they finally died, they were hailed as great successes, not decried as embarrassing failures. Ingenuity will be the same.
By the way, I was never able to find again the article/post where NASA declared that was going to stop funding for Spirit because lasting too long for the budget. Then a couple of months later Spirit definitely failed by itself.
Does anybody remember the article and/or have a link?

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13938
  • UK
  • Liked: 3949
  • Likes Given: 220
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1201 on: 10/19/2023 07:27 pm »
Video of Ingenuity’s 62nd flight:


Offline whitelancer64

Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1202 on: 10/20/2023 06:55 pm »

Look back at the coverage of Spirit and Opportunity. When they finally died, they were hailed as great successes, not decried as embarrassing failures. Ingenuity will be the same.
By the way, I was never able to find again the article/post where NASA declared that was going to stop funding for Spirit because lasting too long for the budget. Then a couple of months later Spirit definitely failed by itself.
Does anybody remember the article and/or have a link?

You might have to be more specific, there were multiple proposals by NASA to shut down both rovers to save budget money. NASA often does this for missions that have completed their primary and extended missions. Congress almost always gives NASA more funding to keep them going. It's a budgetary tactic.
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

Offline Blackstar

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15161
  • Liked: 7570
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1203 on: 10/22/2023 10:24 pm »
Flight number 63:

Offline Blackstar

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15161
  • Liked: 7570
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1204 on: 10/22/2023 10:27 pm »

Look back at the coverage of Spirit and Opportunity. When they finally died, they were hailed as great successes, not decried as embarrassing failures. Ingenuity will be the same.
By the way, I was never able to find again the article/post where NASA declared that was going to stop funding for Spirit because lasting too long for the budget. Then a couple of months later Spirit definitely failed by itself.
Does anybody remember the article and/or have a link?

You might have to be more specific, there were multiple proposals by NASA to shut down both rovers to save budget money. NASA often does this for missions that have completed their primary and extended missions. Congress almost always gives NASA more funding to keep them going. It's a budgetary tactic.

No, that's not how it works. NASA has a process for extending missions known as the senior review process. There is money provided in the individual divisions' budgets to fund extended missions (I think it has tended to be between 13-18% of their budgets). Look up the National Academies' study "Extending Science" (I was the study director) to find out more. NASA plans to extend missions and has a way of doing that. This does not mean that they have all the funding necessary to extend missions to the full amount that their mission teams want, however.

I believe the original poster is referring to the proposal to eliminate Opportunity's budget that came from the Office of Management and Budget. You can find some info about that in the Extending Science report.




Update: I have attached the report.

Here is some info from the report:

"During the 2014 Planetary Science Senior Review, both the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and the Opportunity rover were rated highly for their continued scientific contributions. However, they were both zeroed out for funding in the President’s fiscal year (FY) 2015 and FY2016 budgets. The scientific discoveries made by both missions during their extended phase are addressed in Appendix B of this report."
« Last Edit: 10/23/2023 12:41 am by Blackstar »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47311
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80117
  • Likes Given: 36283
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1205 on: 10/24/2023 07:46 am »
https://twitter.com/nasajpl/status/1716574614829289755

Quote
Ingenuity is going the distance!

The #MarsHelicopter completed Flight 63 last week, flying for more than 2 minutes and traveling 579 meters - its longest distance since Flight 25. https://mars.nasa.gov/technology/helicopter/

Quote
Flight Log
By the Numbers

FLIGHTS
63
 
FLIGHT TIME
~115.3 MINS

DISTANCE FLOWN
9 MILES
(~14.492 km)   

MAX. GROUND SPEED
22.4 MPH
10 m/s

HIGHEST ALTITUDE
24 METERS
(~79 ft)

Offline whitelancer64

Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1206 on: 10/25/2023 11:07 pm »

Look back at the coverage of Spirit and Opportunity. When they finally died, they were hailed as great successes, not decried as embarrassing failures. Ingenuity will be the same.
By the way, I was never able to find again the article/post where NASA declared that was going to stop funding for Spirit because lasting too long for the budget. Then a couple of months later Spirit definitely failed by itself.
Does anybody remember the article and/or have a link?

You might have to be more specific, there were multiple proposals by NASA to shut down both rovers to save budget money. NASA often does this for missions that have completed their primary and extended missions. Congress almost always gives NASA more funding to keep them going. It's a budgetary tactic.

No, that's not how it works. NASA has a process for extending missions known as the senior review process. There is money provided in the individual divisions' budgets to fund extended missions (I think it has tended to be between 13-18% of their budgets). Look up the National Academies' study "Extending Science" (I was the study director) to find out more. NASA plans to extend missions and has a way of doing that. This does not mean that they have all the funding necessary to extend missions to the full amount that their mission teams want, however.

I believe the original poster is referring to the proposal to eliminate Opportunity's budget that came from the Office of Management and Budget. You can find some info about that in the Extending Science report.




Update: I have attached the report.

Here is some info from the report:

"During the 2014 Planetary Science Senior Review, both the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and the Opportunity rover were rated highly for their continued scientific contributions. However, they were both zeroed out for funding in the President’s fiscal year (FY) 2015 and FY2016 budgets. The scientific discoveries made by both missions during their extended phase are addressed in Appendix B of this report."

I mean yeah, there's a whole process NASA goes through to decide which missions to propose to cut and which to extend, but let's not kid anyone, we've seen it happen often, Congress takes the NASA proposal to zero out the budget for a mission and tosses it out the window and says, nope, here's all the money to continue.

SOFIA being a great example of an albatross NASA had been trying to dump for years but Congress kept funding, and it happened a lot to the MER rovers, too.

Sometimes it works the other way around, too, with NASA asking for money for a mission and Congress saying lol, here's half of what you asked for, good luck with that.
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

Offline Blackstar

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15161
  • Liked: 7570
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1207 on: 10/26/2023 12:01 am »
I mean yeah, there's a whole process NASA goes through to decide which missions to propose to cut and which to extend, but let's not kid anyone, we've seen it happen often, Congress takes the NASA proposal to zero out the budget for a mission and tosses it out the window and says, nope, here's all the money to continue.

SOFIA being a great example of an albatross NASA had been trying to dump for years but Congress kept funding, and it happened a lot to the MER rovers, too.

Sometimes it works the other way around, too, with NASA asking for money for a mission and Congress saying lol, here's half of what you asked for, good luck with that.

It really doesn't work like that. For starters, it's not NASA that proposes to cut anything. Those decisions are made higher up, at OMB level. And you write as if this is all just political football. It's not. There is a process. Now what do I mean by "process"? I mean a set of rules and procedures that have been developed over time and are known by the relevant science communities and followed by the agency--the senior review process, which many space scientists are familiar with. (One example is that the senior reviews operate on a 3-year schedule, so every 3 years they hold a senior review for a science division, like planetary science. A regular, predictable schedule allows people to plan for mission extensions.) The example that I cited was a case where the OMB was circumventing the process by trying to axe LRO and Opportunity. And ultimately the fact that there was a process led to those missions continuing to receive funding. (As an aside: because NASA has a process for extending missions, OMB and Congress largely stay hands-off on these decisions. They trust that NASA is making informed choices.)

It's easy to be an armchair cynic and take the attitude that a bunch of idiots are making idiotic decisions. But that's not the case at all. These are hard-working people who take their jobs seriously and think things out. NASA's science programs are by and large well managed.

Just download the report that I linked to and take a look at it. It's a few years old now, but it's still valid.
« Last Edit: 10/26/2023 02:37 am by Blackstar »

Offline whitelancer64

Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1208 on: 10/26/2023 04:46 am »
I mean yeah, there's a whole process NASA goes through to decide which missions to propose to cut and which to extend, but let's not kid anyone, we've seen it happen often, Congress takes the NASA proposal to zero out the budget for a mission and tosses it out the window and says, nope, here's all the money to continue.

SOFIA being a great example of an albatross NASA had been trying to dump for years but Congress kept funding, and it happened a lot to the MER rovers, too.

Sometimes it works the other way around, too, with NASA asking for money for a mission and Congress saying lol, here's half of what you asked for, good luck with that.

It really doesn't work like that. For starters, it's not NASA that proposes to cut anything. Those decisions are made higher up, at OMB level. And you write as if this is all just political football. It's not. There is a process. Now what do I mean by "process"? I mean a set of rules and procedures that have been developed over time and are known by the relevant science communities and followed by the agency--the senior review process, which many space scientists are familiar with. (One example is that the senior reviews operate on a 3-year schedule, so every 3 years they hold a senior review for a science division, like planetary science. A regular, predictable schedule allows people to plan for mission extensions.) The example that I cited was a case where the OMB was circumventing the process by trying to axe LRO and Opportunity. And ultimately the fact that there was a process led to those missions continuing to receive funding. (As an aside: because NASA has a process for extending missions, OMB and Congress largely stay hands-off on these decisions. They trust that NASA is making informed choices.)

It's easy to be an armchair cynic and take the attitude that a bunch of idiots are making idiotic decisions. But that's not the case at all. These are hard-working people who take their jobs seriously and think things out. NASA's science programs are by and large well managed.

Just download the report that I linked to and take a look at it. It's a few years old now, but it's still valid.

I have absolutely nothing against the review process, that's not even what I'm talking about.

Like you said, NASA's FY 2015 budget proposal zeroed out the budget for LRO and Opportunity rover, but Congress said no and funded them.

Then NASA did the exact same thing again in its FY 2016 budget proposal with $0 for the Opportunity rover. And again Congress gave it funding.

And all this was after Opportunity received a grade of “excellent/very good” for ongoing science in the senior level scientific review in September 2014.

And these are far from the only examples.

On some level, there's clearly some budgetary political football going on.
« Last Edit: 10/26/2023 04:55 am by whitelancer64 »
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47311
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80117
  • Likes Given: 36283
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1209 on: 10/28/2023 01:33 pm »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47311
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80117
  • Likes Given: 36283
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1210 on: 11/02/2023 06:01 am »
https://twitter.com/nasajpl/status/1719870334500045066

Quote
Ingenuity will attempt Flight 65 as soon as today! But the #MarsHelicopter isn't stopping there: It will attempt Flight 66 tomorrow, making this the first time its flown back-to-back on consecutive sols!

Flight 65: https://mars.nasa.gov/technology/helicopter/status/493/flight-65-preview-by-the-numbers/
Flight 66: https://mars.nasa.gov/technology/helicopter/status/494/flight-66-preview-by-the-numbers/

Quote
Flight 65
Expected flight date: 11/01/2023
Horizontal flight distance: 7 meters
Expected flight time: 48.26 seconds
Flight altitude: 10 meters
Heading: West
Max flight speed: 1 m/s
Goal of flight: Reposition the helicopter
Airfield: Same

Quote
Flight 66
Expected flight date: 11/02/2023
Horizontal flight distance: 0.5 meters
Expected flight time: 23.38 seconds
Flight altitude: 3 meters
Heading: South
Max flight speed: 1 m/s
Goal of flight: Reposition the helicopter
Airfield: Same

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13938
  • UK
  • Liked: 3949
  • Likes Given: 220
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1211 on: 11/02/2023 09:25 am »
I can see stuff about flight 63, but what about flight 64, I’m guessing it’s occurred?

Offline deadman1204

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1734
  • USA
  • Liked: 1448
  • Likes Given: 2456
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1212 on: 11/06/2023 03:24 pm »
I can see stuff about flight 63, but what about flight 64, I’m guessing it’s occurred?
I can sometimes take a few days to get the info back to Earth.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47311
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80117
  • Likes Given: 36283
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1213 on: 11/07/2023 04:54 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasajpl/status/1721940342113747091

Quote
Two more down! 🚁

Ingenuity has completed Flights 65 AND 66. These two short flights positioned the #MarsHelicopter for the upcoming Mars solar conjunction, when mission teams will pause on sending commands for about 2 weeks. View the flight log:

https://mars.nasa.gov/technology/helicopter/#Flight-Log

Quote
Flight   Sol   Date   Horizontal Distance   Max. Altitude  Max. Groundspeed   Duration   Route of Flight
65   960 Nov. 2, 2023   7   ~23   10   ~33   1   ~2.2   48.0   Airfield Phi
66   961 Nov. 3, 2023   0   ~2   3   ~10   1   ~2.2   23.0   Airfield Phi

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47311
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80117
  • Likes Given: 36283
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1214 on: 11/11/2023 08:31 am »
https://twitter.com/nasajpl/status/1723105980786082067

Quote
A little more than 10 flights ago, Ingenuity performed its first emergency landing on the Red Planet - but the #MarsHelicopter did it flawlessly.

Read the full story from the helicopter's chief engineer ⬇️

https://mars.nasa.gov/technology/helicopter/status/495/the-long-wait/

Quote
STATUS UPDATES | November 06, 2023
The Long Wait
Written by Travis Brown, Chief Engineer Ingenuity Mars Helicopter at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

There was a long delay between Flight 52 and Flight 53,  and a deviation from the published Flight 53 plan. I will address both in this blog post. First, the Flight 53 delay was the direct result of a decision by the team to fly Ingenuity out of telecom communications range with the rover. One may question the wisdom of this, but there are good reasons to do so.
 
When plotting a traversal path through a given area, the team identifies a series of smooth, flat regions referred to as “lily pads” where the helicopter can safely land without significant risk of damage to the vehicle. Because the helicopter’s laser altimeter is fairly sensitive to large terrain variations, the team also generally tries to plan flight paths over the smoothest and flattest terrain available. These terrain types also happen to be the areas favored by rover planners as they are more easily traversable and contain fewer obstacles that might impede rover progress. The result is that in difficult terrain, the two vehicles generally compete for the same narrow path.

Roughly speaking, the Ingenuity team’s top mission priorities are:

1 – Avoid significant interference with, or delay of, rover operations
2 – Maintain vehicle health and safety
3 – Perform scouting for tactical planning and science assessment
4 – Perform experiments to inform mission and vehicle design for future Mars rotorcraft, or collect data for discretionary science

In difficult terrain, the first two priorities result in an emphasis on staying well ahead of Perseverance. Staying only slightly ahead of the rover while providing good data transfer rates is risky since the helicopter may inadvertently block the rover’s path. Staying just behind the rover is also a challenge, as the flight paths of the helicopter would need to be too close to the rover for safety or incorporate energy-sapping diverts to maintain adequate distance. Staying to the side of the rover is often not possible due to communications and landing-site constraints. Staying far behind the rover obviously risks loss of telecom, which would force the rover to reverse (violating priority #1) or leave the helicopter behind (violating priority #2). Thus, the helicopter frequently operates in a narrow slice of terrain several hundred meters ahead of the rover’s position. When telecom permits, the team will try to land at locations parallel to Perseverance’s planned strategic route, but this has been the exception, not the rule over the last year of the mission.

This balancing act require careful planning to maximize operational flexibility, agile replanning of flights/activities on short notice, and a high number of operations shifts focusing on file transfers to compensate for the poor data transfer speeds at the fringes of the radio’s range. Slow data transfer turnaround reduces the achievable flight cadence and operational effectiveness of the helicopter.
Flying slightly ahead of telecom range is one strategy to cope with this environment, as it buys time, reducing the risk of rover interference and/or reducing the demand on the operations team to execute short-notice flights. This, however, has some drawbacks: 1) It further retards operation cadence, as it forces the helicopter to spend more time in regions with poor telecom. 2) It can potentially strand the helicopter beyond comms range if the rover encounters any delay or makes tactical decisions that deviate from the strategic route. This latter vulnerability came into play almost immediately after Ingenuity executed its 52nd flight.

A Waiting Game

Flight 52 was planned as a long-distance, out-of-telecom flight, which was executed on Sol 776 with the expectation that the rover was nearing the end of its exploration at Echo Creek and would be approaching the helicopter’s resting spot near Mt. Julian within a few sols. The flight was performed exactly as planned, with Ingenuity losing radio link at approximately 8 meters (matching our telecom models). Still, the lack of successful landing confirmation meant that the downlinked telemetry for this flight was somewhat less reassuring than typical post-flight downlinks. The team settled in for what was supposed to be a brief but suspenseful wait for Perseverance to catch up and provide confirmation that the intrepid helicopter had landed safely.

Roughly a week later, the rover began moving, but instead of heading southeast toward Mt. Julian as planned, the science team had decided to perform an investigation of the area around Powell Peak. The Ingenuity team members, thankful for the unplanned break but still worrying about the unknown state of the helicopter, prepared for another week or two of waiting. Weeks soon turned into months as the rover overcame various challenges to its schedule. The poor structural integrity of the rock in the area foiled two sampling attempts before the rover team was able to successfully capture a sample on Sol 822 and successfully seal it 10 sols later. People following the rover’s activities will know that this campaign proved to be far more challenging than anyone imagined. Finally, after another week of activities, Perseverance was close enough to re-establish communications with Ingenuity on Sol 837.

In total, Ingenuity had been out of contact for 61 sols, an eternity when the outcome of the flight was unknown to the team. This marked the longest period of helicopter inactivity since Perseverance and Ingenuity landed on the planet. During this time, the Ingenuity team had largely deactivated, with members reallocating their time to work on other projects.

As the team dusted off the cobwebs and started bringing down log files and images from the flight, it became apparent that the helicopter had spent the last two months parked on something truly remarkable. Sitting directly under Ingenuity’s feet, spread over the fractured rock of the riverbed, was a collection of cobbles and pebbles unlike any that scientists had seen before. Many were partially eroded and exhibited a vesicular texture more reminiscent of fresh basalt. These rocks immediately garnered a powerful reaction from project scientists, who requested that Ingenuity perform a dedicated science scouting flight as soon as possible.

The Science Flight That Wasn’t

The team jumped at the rare opportunity to provide valuable and exciting advanced science reconnaissance, but the flight would eventually pan out in a very different way. Flight 53 was to be an extremely interesting flight with extensive RTE (color camera) imagery at low altitude to return a plethora high-resolution ground scans covering portions of the riverbed slightly north of the original landing location. Partway through the flight on Sol 864, however, a synchronization issue with the time-critical navigation camera triggered the “LAND-NOW” fault protection routine in the guidance navigation and control (GNC) subsystem. As the name implies, this caused Ingenuity to abort the flight and land immediately where it was.
Ingenuity corrects its spatial orientation estimate by tracking the movement of ground features within these navcam images, but these data must be perfectly time-synchronized with measurements from the inertial guidance system to provide valid corrections. In the case of Flight 53, this synchronization step mysteriously failed in a way that hadn’t been observed on any of the prior 52 flights on Mars or during the years of ground testing that preceded them. As of this writing, the precise cause is strongly suspected but has not been conclusively proven.

During the development phase of the mission, many fault responses were considered, but with a system as inherently unstable and time sensitive as a helicopter, the best response is almost always to land as soon as possible. Following the R8.0 software update in October of 2022, the fault response had been subtly changed. R8.0 included a new and valuable hazard-divert capability, allowing the helicopter to intelligently shift its landing target to avoid areas that appeared dangerous to its cameras. This update also applied the hazard-divert behavior to the LAND-NOW response. In what was surely a fortunate twist of fate, the GNC team had discovered a peculiar and potentially fatal interaction between these two behaviors just one month prior to flight. By the time of Flight 53, operational changes had been put in place mitigate the issue (preventing the use of hazard-diverts during emergency landings). The Flight 53 LAND-NOW executed precisely as designed, getting the helicopter on the ground quickly and safely. This event was unprecedented and is Ingenuity’s first emergency landing on Mars.

By the time the team had assessed the issue, Perseverance had caught up to the helicopter and passed it on Sol 871, removing the need to complete the imaging planned for Flight 53. Ingenuity returned to the skies of Mars with a short pop-up Flight 54 to get a fix on its location and then resumed its scouting duties at a new location with Flight 55 on Sol 881.

Parting Thoughts

The team is in a constant battle with minimizing and balancing various risks. Ingenuity was flown out of comms range to guard against the very likely possibility that project scientists would opt to head west immediately. This illustrates the difficulty in making effective plans when the ability to execute those plans is entirely dependent on another vehicle, itself subject to unexpected events. This is doubly true since the science mandate of Perseverance rightly dictates that its plans should change as new discoveries are made and new data become available. Even without these inherent coordination challenges, sometimes unexpected events can derail even the most well-laid plans as they did in Flight 53. No one on the project could have predicted the eventual outcome that resulted in the loss of two months of helicopter mission time and the unfortunate loss of one of the most exciting scouting flights in recent memory. Nevertheless, the helicopter will continue up the ancient river delta, balancing risks and providing scouting for the rover where possible. The two Mars vehicles will soon reach an area where the rover is scheduled to loiter for several months. This should significantly relax planning constraints and provide an opportunity for the helicopter to engage in a wider variety of activities.

Image caption:

Quote
Perseverance Checks Out Ingenuity: This image taken by Perseverance rover’s MastCam-Z shows Ingenuity at its Flight 53 emergency landing site on Sol 871.  Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47311
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80117
  • Likes Given: 36283
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1215 on: 11/11/2023 04:47 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasajpl/status/1723385104280465467

Quote
The #MarsHelicopter will be busy during Mars solar conjunction – on the ground! 🚁

Ingenuity's team found a parking spot near these Martian sand ripples, where it will take time-lapse images to better understand the movement of sand grains.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47311
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80117
  • Likes Given: 36283
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1216 on: 11/22/2023 05:49 pm »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47311
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80117
  • Likes Given: 36283
Re: Ingenuity, Mars 2020 Helicopter Drone
« Reply #1217 on: 12/01/2023 06:14 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasajpl/status/1730665006122103062

Quote
After a short break in communication over the past few weeks due to the solar conjunction, Ingenuity has phoned home and is ready to fly!

The #MarsHelicopter will attempt to travel 392 meters for 133 seconds no earlier than Saturday, Dec 2.

https://mars.nasa.gov/technology/helicopter/status/499/flight-67-preview-by-the-numbers/

Quote
Flight 67 Preview – By the Numbers
Written by NASA/JPL

NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter acquired this image using its navigation camera. This camera is mounted in the helicopter's fuselage and pointed directly downward to track the ground during flight.
Mars Helicopter Sol 961 - Navigation Camera: NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter acquired this image using its navigation camera. This camera is mounted in the helicopter's fuselage and pointed directly downward to track the ground during flight. This image was acquired on Nov. 3, 2023 (Sol 961 of the Perseverance rover mission) at the local mean solar time of 10:33:56. This was the date of Ingenuity's 66th flight. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Flight 67
Expected flight date: 12/02/2023
Horizontal flight distance: 392.84 meters
Expected flight time: 133.57 seconds
Flight altitude: 12 meters
Heading: Northwest
Max flight speed: 5.3 m/s
Goal of flight: Reposition the helicopter
Airfield: New

Offline Holger Isenberg

  • Member
  • Posts: 9
  • Liked: 8
  • Likes Given: 1
Helicopter X shadow seen again on sol 961 flight 66
« Reply #1218 on: 12/03/2023 08:14 pm »
Yesterday people at http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com (from this post and further on) noticed something bright X-shaped in the location ot Ingenuity's takeoff. Two clips from images from both cameras, displayed at that forum, are attached.

The shape of the 'bright X' looks similar to the shadow of helicopter's blades. However, helicopter flies away and the 'bright X' remains in its place…

The X reappeared at a different location as seen on takeoff on flight 66, sol 961, Nov 3 2023. Visible on this preview-image release on Nov 11, 2023: https://twitter.com/nasajpl/status/1723385104280465467

With marks for locating it: https://twitter.com/areoinfo/status/1723608022839415173

Only 2 color images have been released yet from this flight, but not yet the one shown as preview on Nov 11:
https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/multimedia/raw-images/?af=HELI_RTE#raw-images

In my presentation at the Mars Society this year at ASU, I speculated about the cause of the 2021-observed X, maybe something like xeroradiography. Free PDF download of the presentation slides: http://researchgate.net/publication/374535219_Modern_Martian_Mysteries

Offline Holger Isenberg

  • Member
  • Posts: 9
  • Liked: 8
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Helicopter X shadow seen again on sol 961 flight 66
« Reply #1219 on: 12/05/2023 02:08 am »
The X reappeared at a different location as seen on takeoff on flight 66, sol 961, Nov 3 2023.

Now confirmed by a monochrome Navcam image released a few minutes ago:
https://twitter.com/areoinfo/status/1731859150479806745

raw images: https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/multimedia/raw-images/?af=HELI_NAV,HELI_RTE&begin_sol=962&end_sol=962

Apparently it is only visible under a certain phase angle between sun and ground location. Flight 66 was only a short 23s hop of 0.5m distance and flight 65 actually moved previously the location by 7m.


Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Margaritaville Beach Resort South Padre Island
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
1