Author Topic: LOST IN SPACE Trailer #1 NEW (2018) Netflix Sci-Fi Series HD  (Read 6805 times)

Offline MATTBLAK

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I think it works very well. I have very few 'red flags' I could fault it for. 'Trillions of light years' made me roll my eyes a moment, as the Universe likely isn't that big.
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Offline Jarnis

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To me the continuing series of highly improbable (or, at times, implausible) "random events" putting our heroes in peril again and again is getting slightly repetitive.

But after 5 episodes I still want to see where it all goes. And yes, this one clearly had a budget, so it looks nice and clearly at least some people in the production team has some clue, even if it does not include the people who are writing the scripts (that could use some spanking for some brain farts...)

Offline yg1968

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I am not crazy about it. I have watched the first 4 shows. It is slow paced and it seems to have been written for teenage girls as their target audience. There are certain things that I like about it: the Alpha Centauri references.
« Last Edit: 04/16/2018 05:39 PM by yg1968 »

Offline sanman

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I think it works very well. I have very few 'red flags' I could fault it for. 'Trillions of light years' made me roll my eyes a moment, as the Universe likely isn't that big.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but the scenario they seem to be presenting is that while on a routine trip to the colony at Proxima Centauri, the colonial transport ship The Resolute has inadvertently passed through a wormhole, and ended up in a distant galaxy.

As a result, they have traipsed into a region of space controlled by some alien civilization, and encountered the alien equivalent of a Predator Drone - ie. the Robot. Both the Robinsons and the Robot have crash-landed on a nearby planet.
The Robot has lots its memory and original programming in the crash, and has consequently become the domesticated pet of Will Robinson and family.
« Last Edit: 04/16/2018 10:34 PM by sanman »

Offline Thorny

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It looked to me like the attack happened first. We don't know why the attack happened or what made the Resolute and Jupiters go through a wormhole.

Offline su27k

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I think it works very well. I have very few 'red flags' I could fault it for. 'Trillions of light years' made me roll my eyes a moment, as the Universe likely isn't that big.

Correct me if I'm wrong

The observable Universe has a diameter of about 91 billion light years, saying they're "Trillions of light years" away is quite inaccurate, and the mother as an astrophysicist should know this.

Offline the_other_Doug

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I think it works very well. I have very few 'red flags' I could fault it for. 'Trillions of light years' made me roll my eyes a moment, as the Universe likely isn't that big.

Correct me if I'm wrong

The observable Universe has a diameter of about 91 billion light years, saying they're "Trillions of light years" away is quite inaccurate, and the mother as an astrophysicist should know this.

Except for the fact that the only thing cosmologists now admit is that there is a "lightspeed wall" beyond which we cannot see, but that this does *not* define the physical extent of the universe.

The idea is that this universe is actually infinite, that the original monoblock that contained our entire universe just prior to the Big Bang contained within it infinite extents of (at least) the three physical dimensions we can observe, and that during the initial stages of expansion of the universe these physical dimensions unfolded.  By the time the forces separated out of the unified force into the various forces we now observe, and baryonic matter began to appear, the physical dimensions "unfolded" to an infinite extent.  That unfolding occurred very quickly; the universe expanded/unfolded from a finite space the size of the solar system to a completely infinite extent, according to these theories, in a matter of a nanosecond or two.  Far, far faster than the speed of light.

So, while we can only see light generated since the Big Bang 13.2 (or whatever the decimal point is these days) billion years ago, because of the limit of how fast light can travel, supposedly these infinite dimensions were capable of containing an infinite amount of energy folded into them.  Which means the universe unfolded from a finite space into an infinite space moments after the Big Bang occurred, and therefore, from any position in the universe, while you can only see 13 and fraction billion light years distant, you can travel trillions of light years and just see within a 13.2-billion-light-year-radius sphere.

In other words, under this concept, the observable universe is simply a tiny bit of an infinite universe.

Now, to be honest, I think this theory comes solely from the mathematics that state that if the CMB is observably overall homogeneous in re temperature, and is spatially flat, then the universe cannot be finite.  It is the vast similarity of temperature/energy across the CMB and its spatial flatness that argues for the infinite universe.  This "infinite dimensions unfolded from a finite space" concept is what you get when your observations support both a Big Bang and a flat CMB.  (If this is all actually true, I would suspect that the same forces which caused the unfolding of our observable three dimensions into a flat infinity are still at work; this could explain why every point in the far universe seems to be rushing away from us.)

At least, this is my best understanding of it.  I distrust it, because it is based on mathematics that no one can (or is willing to) sit down and explain to me in non-mathematical terms.  And, in my humble opinion, mathematics that cannot be explained in words as to how they define physical processes -- and especially mathematics that build on other mathematics that cannot be related via any other form of communication to physical processes -- all amounts to nothing more than symbol-manipulation masturbation... ;)
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline Dalhousie

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The idea is that this universe is actually infinite, that the original monoblock that contained our entire universe just prior to the Big Bang contained within it infinite extents of (at least) the three physical dimensions we can observe, and that during the initial stages of expansion of the universe these physical dimensions unfolded.  By the time the forces separated out of the unified force into the various forces we now observe, and baryonic matter began to appear, the physical dimensions "unfolded" to an infinite extent.  That unfolding occurred very quickly; the universe expanded/unfolded from a finite space the size of the solar system to a completely infinite extent, according to these theories, in a matter of a nanosecond or two.  Far, far faster than the speed of light.

I know about half a dozen cosmologists (one with a nobel prize) and none of them subscribe to this idea......
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline the_other_Doug

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The idea is that this universe is actually infinite, that the original monoblock that contained our entire universe just prior to the Big Bang contained within it infinite extents of (at least) the three physical dimensions we can observe, and that during the initial stages of expansion of the universe these physical dimensions unfolded.  By the time the forces separated out of the unified force into the various forces we now observe, and baryonic matter began to appear, the physical dimensions "unfolded" to an infinite extent.  That unfolding occurred very quickly; the universe expanded/unfolded from a finite space the size of the solar system to a completely infinite extent, according to these theories, in a matter of a nanosecond or two.  Far, far faster than the speed of light.

I know about half a dozen cosmologists (one with a nobel prize) and none of them subscribe to this idea......

Good!  Because when I heard someone pose the question elsewhere, I found a cosmology forum and asked how the Big Bang could be congruent with an infinite universe.  I was told by a vast majority of the posters there that if I didn't have at least a PhD in mathematics, with preferably a second PhD in cosmology, I had no right to even pose the question.  One guy tried to explain in words the concept that infinite physical dimensions unfolded as part of the immediate aftermath of the Big Bang, that the CMB observations proved that the universe is flat, and that a flat universe must (for reasons he said were impossible to explain without understanding the math) be infinite.

The vast majority response at that website reinforced my opinion that most of those guys had no idea how any of their math could possibly have anything to do with the observable universe, but hey, don't the equations look neat...  :P
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline SimonFD

I nearly didn't get past the first scene. Yes, the card play was {...you don't want to know what's hidden here...} but what had me reaching for the remote was the computer voiceover giving the height in feet (well ok. I suppose. given where it's made) while on screen there was a close up of the height in METRES showing the SAME NUMBER!! >:(
« Last Edit: 04/18/2018 06:40 PM by SimonFD »
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Offline Dalhousie

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The idea is that this universe is actually infinite, that the original monoblock that contained our entire universe just prior to the Big Bang contained within it infinite extents of (at least) the three physical dimensions we can observe, and that during the initial stages of expansion of the universe these physical dimensions unfolded.  By the time the forces separated out of the unified force into the various forces we now observe, and baryonic matter began to appear, the physical dimensions "unfolded" to an infinite extent.  That unfolding occurred very quickly; the universe expanded/unfolded from a finite space the size of the solar system to a completely infinite extent, according to these theories, in a matter of a nanosecond or two.  Far, far faster than the speed of light.

I know about half a dozen cosmologists (one with a nobel prize) and none of them subscribe to this idea......

Good!  Because when I heard someone pose the question elsewhere, I found a cosmology forum and asked how the Big Bang could be congruent with an infinite universe.  I was told by a vast majority of the posters there that if I didn't have at least a PhD in mathematics, with preferably a second PhD in cosmology, I had no right to even pose the question.  One guy tried to explain in words the concept that infinite physical dimensions unfolded as part of the immediate aftermath of the Big Bang, that the CMB observations proved that the universe is flat, and that a flat universe must (for reasons he said were impossible to explain without understanding the math) be infinite.

The vast majority response at that website reinforced my opinion that most of those guys had no idea how any of their math could possibly have anything to do with the observable universe, but hey, don't the equations look neat...  :P

I try and look intelligent in their company. Though I may only understand half of what they say and none of the mathematics, it is fun :D
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline HVM

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Yeah, it's not Westworld or The Expanse, but clearly better than both of the wanabee Star Treks; STD or Orville. What I still don't get over is that TV series look better than most movies today. (Practical and CGI VFX are almost seamless...)

Also does anyone else get some of the Martian/AndyWeir/RidleyScott vibe here? Even if engineering/science is not so spot on.

Offline Blackstar

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What I still don't get over is that TV series look better than most movies today. (Practical and CGI VFX are almost seamless...)

Well... it somewhat depends. You have to look closely. And you're not always comparing apples and oranges. Some of the LiS effects even in the pilot were a bit off. Watch the scene where the Jupiter is sinking and you'll notice some of the ice looks weird. The perspective is off. And when they filmed the actors supposedly on top of a glacier they didn't look very cold and the snow occasionally looked like styrofoam. The show didn't use CGI to cover for the limitations of the practical effects. Once you pay attention, it really starts to look like they're on a studio soundstage, not outside.

One of the big differences between TV and movies when it comes to CGI is that TV often does not have as many elements. The shots are not as complex. They just don't have the time for that.

However, movie CGI can often look crappy because even though they have more time to produce it, often they overwhelm the viewer with movement rather than working to get it seamless. A good example is the various Transformers movies, where they have so many moving parts that it's all just a blur and your brain never processes much of it. But if you slowed it down, you'd see that it was actually rather messy, not careful CGI. So movie effects are often more ambitious, and that can hide the sloppiness.

Online JazzFan

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I loved it and watched all episodes twice and see the first season as setting up the foundation that the original series did in 2 episodes.  I even liked the movie that was panned by everyone.  Of course, I have to share that I pretty much like all science fiction and approach it from the fact that its fiction and meant to entertain and the writers and directors are typically not scientist or engineers.  I take the advice of my former mother in law who loved those silly Vern movies, "Son sometimes you just need to turn off your brain and laugh.  You will enjoy more of life."  That wonderful woman died smiling and happy.

Offline Jeff Lerner

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I've watched the first four episodes....I can't get into it...the acting is terrible...especially the actor/kid who plays Will Robinson...so annoying....but I've come to the conclusion I'm not the intended age demographic anyways..Teens and Tweens are going to love it...

Offline MATTBLAK

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Maxwell Jenkins - the kid playing Will Robinson is fine; you must be watching a different show than I did. He starts off a bit whiny and timid and becomes quite brave and capable by the last few episodes. Mina Sundwall, who plays Penny is rather good. Taylor Russel who is Judy Robinson; gets a similar character growth to Will.

One thing I remarked about to my wife as we had watched was how Maureen and John Robinson - Molly Parker and Toby Stephens - get the absolute crap knocked out of them through the ten episodes. Cuts, bruises and scrapes that make them look like they've been through a war zone!
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Offline Barrie

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Am I the only person who has a problem with the idea of finding native magnesium?  Also comes up in Journey to the Centre of the Earth (2008)

Offline Comga

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Am I the only person who has a problem with the idea of finding native magnesium?  Also comes up in Journey to the Centre of the Earth (2008)
So the geology is as bad as the physics.
Running ground-to-orbit spacecraft on small internal tanks of hydrocarbon fuel?
They would have done better with gibberish like dilithium crystals.
Ditto on the solar powered all-terrain SUV dragsters, without solar panels I might add.
And Netflix shows use the opposite of tight editing. Instead of cutting out anything that is not absolutely necessary to the story they edit in everything that won’t kill the story.
But as light entertainment it's not bad.
At least the smuggler packs an appropriate precision commodity, and a good brand, if not the top shelf vintage.
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline Barrie

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And Netflix shows use the opposite of tight editing. Instead of cutting out anything that is not absolutely necessary to the story they edit in everything that won’t kill the story.
But as light entertainment it's not bad.

Yeah, most TV is just a time-killing service anyway.

Frank Lloyd Wright said TV was chewing gum for the eyes.  The take-home from that is that when you have finished with it, you should spit it out, don't swallow it!

Offline Thorny

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Ditto on the solar powered all-terrain SUV dragsters, without solar panels I might add.

I thought they had some sort of nuclear power cell. Judy swam down to get one in the pilot episode.

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