Author Topic: South Korean space developments  (Read 28128 times)

Offline wesley

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #20 on: 02/03/2016 06:23 AM »
Very interesting to see the roadmap from the single engine, then 2, then 4, then 9.   I think they have been paying attention to another successful entrant into the global launch market.   They are working on a M1-D class G.G engine and similar engine configurations further down their roadmap.   The KSLV IV looks pretty darn close to the SpaceX FH, and if I interpreted the figures right, they say it will get 64t to LEO.   I also think I am seeing a 4.4m core & 47m tall vehicle called out in the picture.  So its a bit more squatty than FH.  They also look to be trying to gain some staging efficiency with the 3 stage configuration.   I'd be interested in the mass fractions they are projecting for the various stages of the KSLV-IV.
You've interpreted the number correctly. KSLV-4 is still quite far away, so we'll have to see how that pans out.

Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #21 on: 04/01/2016 11:07 PM »
Some recent news on this. Maybe more appropriately belonging here : https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33272.0


Yonhap News 2016/01/31
Quote
On the country's plans to send a unmanned probe to the moon, KARI said that the program involves a locally built probe being sent to the Moon on a foreign-made rocket in 2018. It said the moon mission and the KSLV-2 are not linked at present.


Yonhap News 2015/12/30
Quote
South Korea's science ministry said Wednesday it plans to launch a lunar exploration project next year, eventually seeking to send a landing vessel by 2020.
Under the first stage of the project that will run from 2016 to 2018, the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning will allocate 197.8 billion won (US$169 million) to conduct research and send an orbiter.
The ministry said it has already secured a 20 billion-won budget for 2016.

Korea Herald, 2016-02-28
Quote
South Korea will spend a total of 746.4 billion won ($603 million) on its space program this year, as part of efforts to realize its long-cherished goal of reaching the moon.
The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning said Sunday that it has also agreed with relevant ministries to allocate 200 billion won for the next three years to launch its first lunar exploration

LPSC2016, March
Quote
As part of the national space promotion plan and presidential national agen-das, South Korea’s institutes and agencies under the auspices of the Ministry of Science, Information and Communication Technology and Future Planning (MSIP) are currently working on a phase-A study for a Korean Lunar Exploration Program (KLEP) [1]. A Korean pathfinder lunar orbiter (KPLO) is to be fol-lowed by a Korean Lunar Explorer (KLE) which con-stitutes an orbiter and a lander unit equipped with a small rover with a mass of approximately 20 kg

KPLO’s main scientific return is considered to be composed of visual and spectral image data, space environmental measurements and data related to lunar resources. For the exploration of lunar resources two major exploration areas need to be considered: (1) resources in polar regions for the potential establish-ment of lunar bases or (2) future energy resources such as Helium-3 and precious rare earth elements along with radioactive resources like Uranium. KPLO is planned to operate in a circular polar orbit at an orbit altitude of 100 km. Its size will be 1.9 x 1.7 x 2.3 (m) with a dry mass of 550 kg. The total science payload mass will amount to approximately 40 kg with instru-ments contributed by the Korean Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and other Korean research institutes and centers, as well as NASA. The development peri-ods for KPLO and KLE are considered to be 2016–2018 and 2017–2020, respectively [1].


Also, one more 2015 poster:
http://nesf2015.arc.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/downloads/pdf/10.pdf

From this it seems that the orbiter project for 2018 is definitely funded and going seriously ahead in 2016. It also seems to have an official KPLO name now. The timeline of course is ambitious, as it seems to involve indigenous ground tracking infrastructure build-out etc, plus a launch on foreign launch vehicle.
« Last Edit: 04/01/2016 11:16 PM by savuporo »
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Online Galactic Penguin SST

Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #22 on: 04/02/2016 09:54 AM »
Some recent news on this. Maybe more appropriately belonging here : https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33272.0


Yonhap News 2016/01/31
Quote
On the country's plans to send a unmanned probe to the moon, KARI said that the program involves a locally built probe being sent to the Moon on a foreign-made rocket in 2018. It said the moon mission and the KSLV-2 are not linked at present.


Yonhap News 2015/12/30
Quote
South Korea's science ministry said Wednesday it plans to launch a lunar exploration project next year, eventually seeking to send a landing vessel by 2020.
Under the first stage of the project that will run from 2016 to 2018, the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning will allocate 197.8 billion won (US$169 million) to conduct research and send an orbiter.
The ministry said it has already secured a 20 billion-won budget for 2016.

Korea Herald, 2016-02-28
Quote
South Korea will spend a total of 746.4 billion won ($603 million) on its space program this year, as part of efforts to realize its long-cherished goal of reaching the moon.
The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning said Sunday that it has also agreed with relevant ministries to allocate 200 billion won for the next three years to launch its first lunar exploration

LPSC2016, March
Quote
As part of the national space promotion plan and presidential national agen-das, South Korea’s institutes and agencies under the auspices of the Ministry of Science, Information and Communication Technology and Future Planning (MSIP) are currently working on a phase-A study for a Korean Lunar Exploration Program (KLEP) [1]. A Korean pathfinder lunar orbiter (KPLO) is to be fol-lowed by a Korean Lunar Explorer (KLE) which con-stitutes an orbiter and a lander unit equipped with a small rover with a mass of approximately 20 kg

KPLO’s main scientific return is considered to be composed of visual and spectral image data, space environmental measurements and data related to lunar resources. For the exploration of lunar resources two major exploration areas need to be considered: (1) resources in polar regions for the potential establish-ment of lunar bases or (2) future energy resources such as Helium-3 and precious rare earth elements along with radioactive resources like Uranium. KPLO is planned to operate in a circular polar orbit at an orbit altitude of 100 km. Its size will be 1.9 x 1.7 x 2.3 (m) with a dry mass of 550 kg. The total science payload mass will amount to approximately 40 kg with instru-ments contributed by the Korean Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and other Korean research institutes and centers, as well as NASA. The development peri-ods for KPLO and KLE are considered to be 2016–2018 and 2017–2020, respectively [1].


Also, one more 2015 poster:
http://nesf2015.arc.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/downloads/pdf/10.pdf

From this it seems that the orbiter project for 2018 is definitely funded and going seriously ahead in 2016. It also seems to have an official KPLO name now. The timeline of course is ambitious, as it seems to involve indigenous ground tracking infrastructure build-out etc, plus a launch on foreign launch vehicle.

IIRC wasn't it supposed to be LADEE-based since I remember KARI has an agreement with NASA signed in the past?
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Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #23 on: 04/02/2016 03:40 PM »
IIRC wasn't it supposed to be LADEE-based since I remember KARI has an agreement with NASA signed in the past?

Do you have a source for that ? Because both the timeline and scope of the recently signed LOUis and MOUs do not seem to indicate anything as extensive in collaboration, and would also likely run into ITAR and other technology transfer issues. They seem to have signed a 'technical assistance agreement' with JPL, whereas LADEE was Ames and GSFC. And that TAA i would guess is more about tracking and operations.

Also see this article published by KARI this year:
Getting the facts about the Korea-US Space Cooperation Agreement
Quote
2. Does it include direct technology transfer related to the development of a launch vehicle and lunar exploration?

This agreement comprehensively stipulates the content of and procedure for cooperation on projects, but technology transfer is neither a prerequisite nor the purpose of the agreement

But the timelines they are talking about do seem highly accelerated, call for instrument proposals in Jan 2016 and launch in 2018

EDIT: Just out of interest. There is this Cubesat mission collaboration between NASA and Kari
http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasa-engineer-awaits-launch-of-cubesat-mission-demonstrating-virtual-telescope-tech

KARI providing spacecraft, Goddard experiments, launch on SpaceX

EDIT2: Further guess. The spacecraft will be based on KOMPSAT, the payload masses seem similar:

https://directory.eoportal.org/web/eoportal/satellite-missions/k/kompsat-5
« Last Edit: 04/02/2016 04:17 PM by savuporo »
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Offline ImpMK

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #24 on: 04/03/2016 06:52 AM »
EDIT2: Further guess. The spacecraft will be based on KOMPSAT, the payload masses seem similar:

https://directory.eoportal.org/web/eoportal/satellite-missions/k/kompsat-5

The launch mass of KPLO will be about 550 kg, and its mass budget for scientific payloads is expected to be about 60-70 kg. But the launch mass of KOMPSAT-5 is 1,315 kg...

Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #25 on: 09/12/2016 02:41 AM »
http://sservi.nasa.gov/articles/salmon-2-opportunity-for-korea-pathfinder-lunar-orbiter-kplo-instruments/
Quote
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) Advanced Explorations Systems (AES) Division anticipates making opportunities available for a limited number of instruments to be Ride Share Payloads on the Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter (KPLO).

Supported by their National Policy plan, the Republic of South Korea, through the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI), has created a goal to robotically explore the moon and has established a lunar program called Korea Lunar Exploration Program (KLEP). KARI intends on launching KPLO followed by a lunar lander including a lunar surface rover, and another orbiter by 2020. The first mission would be the launch of the KPLO in December 2018 on a technology demonstration and science mission into lunar orbit. KARI is in partnership with NASA to provide ride share for NASA-sponsored payloads on the KPLO mission.
..

Who came up with the backronym for this ..

EDIT: also
http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2016-2419
The Lunar Space Communications Architecture From The KARI-NASA Joint Study
Includes this nice table of upcoming lunar missions, below.

More, a CubeSat impartor is being considered as one of the payloads

Two other papers, funded by KPLO activities, over last few months:

http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2016-2311
Preliminary Design of LUDOLP: the Flight Dynamics Subsystem for the Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter Mission

http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2016-2603
Conceptual Design and Implementation of an Integrated  Database for Automatic State Synchronization between  Spacecraft and Simulator

« Last Edit: 09/12/2016 03:20 AM by savuporo »
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Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #26 on: 01/17/2017 04:21 AM »
A lot of KPLO related briefs in here

An Introduction to Mission Concept of Operations of KPLO
Quote
KPLO is the first mission of the Korean lunar exploration program. The mission objectives of the KPLO are 1) development of key technologies for lunar exploration, 2) scientific investigation of the Moon and lunar environment, and 3) realization and validation of new space technology. The mission concept of operations of KPLO is the key system-level design to provide various mission concepts, spacecraft description, instruments overview, and preliminary operations concepts for the KPLO mission. In this research, the operation concepts of recent foreign lunar orbiters are explained briefly. And then, System architecture, instruments overview, trajectory overview, and mission phases overview of KPLO are described compared to the foreign lunar missions. Each mission phase include operational concepts of KPLO. Mission concept of operations of KPLO is not defined yet, but it will be updated and matured concurrently with the system design.

Also, NASA hosted KPLO proposals were due in Nov 18

https://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={AF44B73B-7DBF-5540-1793-4C5491CFFE7C}&path=init
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Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #27 on: 03/14/2017 05:56 AM »
KSLV-2 75-ton engine 145 second test fire,  Nov 29, 2016



Same thing from the business end:
« Last Edit: 03/14/2017 05:57 AM by savuporo »
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Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #28 on: 03/14/2017 06:01 AM »
Propellant tanks of engineering model of KSLV being integrated

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Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #29 on: 03/14/2017 06:48 AM »
Also, the videos above are actually from May 4th, 2016 according to this more recent update

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/news/2016/12/22/0200000000AEN20161222008200320.html

Dec 22, 2016
Quote
SEOUL, Dec. 22 (Yonhap) -- South Korea's planned test-launch of its homegrown engine for a space rocket was delayed by 10 months to late 2018, because more time is needed to address some technical glitches, officials said Thursday.

The delay was formally endorsed at a meeting of space-related officials earlier in the day, said the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning.

South Korea had previously planned to test-launch the 75-ton engine in December next year, but the test is now expected to be launched in October 2018, ministry officials said.

As part of a long-term project to produce an indigenous three-stage KSLV-2 rocket, the government had pushed for the development of a two-stage test rocket by the end of 2017. But, the Korea Aerospace Research Institute said in a report earlier this year that it will have to delay the test-launch by about 10 months, citing a problem in the combustion of the engine and more trouble in the welding of a fuel tank.

 South Korea aims to launch a moon orbiter as early as 2020.

"If a test-launch of the 75-ton engine fails or technical problems are found, it will take more time to build the three-stage KSLV-2 rocket," said Bae Tae-min, a senior official at the ministry's large-scale public research policy division.

Bae indicated that the timeframe for developing a homegrown space rocket could be affected, depending on the result of the test-launch.

EDIT: Nah, pic in the article was from May 4th, the full duration burn apparently still from later date, as per:
http://spaceflight101.com/south-korea-advances-rocket-engine-development-testing-for-kslv-ii-rocket/
« Last Edit: 03/14/2017 06:52 AM by savuporo »
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Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #30 on: 04/08/2017 07:27 AM »
75-ton engine TVC test



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Offline wesley

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #31 on: 03/02/2018 06:48 AM »
Recent developments on the KSLV-2!

http://businesskorea.co.kr/english/news/national/20467-korean-space-launch-vehicle-launch-kslv-postponed-2021

While it's called a postponement, the development timeline is actually going back to what it was originally. The previous (and impeached) president pushed the schedule too much. So now the schedule is:

- Test vehicle (single stage, 1x75Ton engine) launch: October 2018
- First launch: February 2021
- Second launch: October 2021

I think it's now a much more realistic goal. Same goes to the lunar lander project, which has now been delayed to 2030.


For those interested, you can see the video coverage of the aforementioned KSLV-2 test vehicle assembly in this news clip:

http://news.kbs.co.kr/news/view.do?ncd=3607352



It mentions the successful launch of Falcon Heavy because KARI is following the model of the SpaceX rockets - specifically, bundling multiple medium-power engines.
« Last Edit: 03/05/2018 07:20 AM by wesley »

Offline AncientU

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #32 on: 03/14/2018 12:21 PM »
New reusable launch vehicle:
Quote
S. Korea to develop reusable space launch vehicle
Quote
South Korea will push forward with an ambitious plan to develop a reusable space launch vehicle as the country strives to become a global powerhouse in the aerospace industry, the chief of the country's aerospace institute said Wednesday.

Recently, SpaceX, spearheaded by millionaire Elon Musk, successfully launched and landed the partially reusable rockets.

Up until now, practically all orbital rockets were disposable, meaning the rockets were thrown away after being launched into space.

"Rockets are reused in cases like SpaceX," Lim Cheol-ho, director of the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI), told reporters in Seoul. "KARI is currently in the process of mapping out a basic plan for a similar rocket."
http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/news/2018/03/14/0200000000AEN20180314009200320.html
"If we shared everything [we are working on] people would think we are insane!"
-- SpaceX friend of mlindner

Offline wesley

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #33 on: 03/28/2018 12:06 AM »
220-second test firing of the KARI 75-Ton engine:



The duration is about 75 seconds longer than the nominal burn time for the engine when it's used in the second stage of the KSLV-2.

Offline noogie

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #34 on: 06/03/2018 03:32 AM »
New reusable launch vehicle:


Interestingly enough, with their engine and the confirmed buy in of reuse from top management, I think that they are the furthest non US player along in reuse.

Here's why I think they are in a good position regarding developing a reusable rocket program

- They aren't encumbered by legacy requirements - solid boosters that hold back Europe, ULA and India for reuse are not an issue for them

- The fall through of the Russian engine and need to develop their current engine may well have been a blessing in disguise. It gives them an engine of the right size for reuse. That they designed it themselves from scratch also puts them in a better position to ensure or add necessary features for reuse (multiple air restarts, throttability, etc)

- They aren't encumbered by the "political overhead" of needing to spread work around important nations/states like Europe and SLS are. Their political requirement is that the Chaebols get the work but that isn't much of an issue as there are probably no players outside of the Chaebols in South Korea that could do the work anyway  :)

- Russia and the countries that acquired the oxygen rich staged combustion (ORSC) technology from the former soviet countries (China and India) are actually at a disadvantage regarding reuse. The engine is too big (unless they want to create a mega rocket) and doesn't have the ability to throttle enough or do multiple air restarts that you want for reuse.
China and India especially are now in the delicate position of just having spent a huge amount of resources making rocket systems around these engines and now having to rework or redo them for reuse.

In all I think that South Korea are in a position to do in reusable rockets, with their Falcon 9 resembling rocket  what Samsung did with the smart phone market :P
« Last Edit: 06/03/2018 03:50 AM by noogie »

Offline K210

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #35 on: 06/03/2018 04:57 AM »
Quote
(China and India) are actually at a disadvantage regarding reuse. The engine is too big (unless they want to create a mega rocket) and doesn't have the ability to throttle enough or do multiple air restarts that you want for reuse.
China and India especially are now in the delicate position of just having spent a huge amount of resources making rocket systems around these engines and now having to rework or redo them for reuse.

Neither china nor india have any intention of reworking their rockets powered by ORSC technology. Both china and india will only use their ORSC based engines on heavy lift vehicles such as the Long March 5 and GSLV MK-3. Vehicles of this class have very low launch frequency and have very niche payloads so reusability really does not make sense. 

Besides the chinese and indian space programs are not as commercialised as western space programs. The vast majority of payloads that fly on Indian/Chinese rockets are property of their respective governments.
« Last Edit: 06/03/2018 04:58 AM by K210 »

Offline noogie

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #36 on: 06/03/2018 05:45 AM »

Neither china nor india have any intention of reworking their rockets powered by ORSC technology. Both china and india will only use their ORSC based engines on heavy lift vehicles such as the Long March 5 and GSLV MK-3. Vehicles of this class have very low launch frequency and have very niche payloads so reusability really does not make sense. 


China have based nearly all of their future rockets (all their liquid ones at any rate) on the ORSC engines, including the smaller Long Marches 6-8. With Long March 8, they are looking at experimenting with reuse by keeping the side boosters still attached on landing to increase the weight since they can't throttle down enough.
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=8447.440
This looks like a kludge to get something up to learn about learning landing the booster while they come up with a longer term solution (probably more smaller more throttlable engine or combination of YF-100 and a cluster of sea level YF-115s modified as landing engines) on the booster.
To me that looks to be in a worse position WRT reuse than the South Koreans. I'm sure they will get there - but it will take longer and be more expensive than with what the Koreans have at hand.

Quote
Besides the chinese and indian space programs are not as commercialised as western space programs. The vast majority of payloads that fly on Indian/Chinese rockets are property of their respective governments.

They may have a lot of funding with state backing but it's not unlimited.
If reuse really does bring the costs substantially down (as is looking increasingly likely), it will leave them at a substantial disadvantage. There are opportunity costs that state actors are not immune to either.
Being shackled to a an overly expensive launcher also has knock on effects downstream - as we saw with NASA and the US DoD having to cancel otherwise worthwhile projects as they were stuck with the prohibitively expensive shuttle and Titan IV for heavy lift in the 1990s.

I think the South Koreans have lucked into a good position for reuse. With sensible leadership, I think they are ahead of everyone except SpaceX and Blue Origin.
« Last Edit: 06/03/2018 06:17 AM by noogie »

Offline K210

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #37 on: 06/03/2018 08:28 AM »
Quote
With Long March 8, they are looking at experimenting with reuse by keeping the side boosters still attached on landing to increase the weight since they can't throttle down enough.

A lot of countries are experimenting with reusability technology but few are adopting it. India also has a VVTL demonstrator in the works while europe has adeline. Point being that VVTL reusability is far from proven at this point so one can not really say what the future of reusability looks like.

The whole concept of reusable rockets only makes sense if there is a mass market to provide payloads which simply does not look like it will exist in the near future. Spacex have already had several delays this year due to the vehicle being ready before its payload.

In my personal opinion i think the future of reusable rockets will be SSTO (single stage to orbit) based. Numerous countries are working on scramjet technology that has demonstrated ability to lower costs significantly.

Offline noogie

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #38 on: 06/03/2018 10:07 AM »
Quote
With Long March 8, they are looking at experimenting with reuse by keeping the side boosters still attached on landing to increase the weight since they can't throttle down enough.

A lot of countries are experimenting with reusability technology but few are adopting it. India also has a VVTL demonstrator in the works while europe has adeline. Point being that VVTL reusability is far from proven at this point so one can not really say what the future of reusability looks like.


I would argue that we are close to proving it and that the South Koreans look like they are following it ::)
This is straying off topic and I'm not going to add to this any further

Offline Patchouli

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #39 on: 06/04/2018 08:10 PM »
KARI 75 is supposedly inspired by Merlin 1D though I'm not sure how deeply it can throttle.

I'm not sure if they plan on doing VTOL but Spacex style RTLS booster recovery would be a good match for their needs.

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