Author Topic: SpaceX F9/Dragon 2 : CRS2 SpX-29 : KSC LC-39A : 9/10 November 2023 (01:28 UTC)  (Read 53324 times)

Offline rocketenthusiast

  • Member
  • Posts: 36
  • Liked: 14
  • Likes Given: 0
do we think that B1081.2 will be the booster for this mission? i suspect so as it is the booster that is due up. also NASA likes to fly on newer boosters.

do we think that B1081.2 will be the booster for this mission? i suspect so as it is the booster that is due up. also NASA likes to fly on newer boosters.

Passed by the VAB this morning, so yeah, I would say very likely unless they use it for one of the next 2 starlink missions from pad 40.
« Last Edit: 10/23/2023 05:46 pm by spacenuance »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47410
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80264
  • Likes Given: 36320

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47410
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80264
  • Likes Given: 36320
https://www.nasa.gov/missions/station/iss-research/nasas-spacex-crs-29-mission-flies-research-to-the-space-station/

Quote
NASA’s SpaceX CRS-29 Mission Flies Research to the Space Station

Melissa L. Gaskill
OCT 23, 2023
ARTICLE
CONTENTS
Laser Communication from Space
Watching Waves in the Atmosphere
More science going to the space station

The 29th SpaceX commercial resupply services (CRS) mission for NASA carries scientific experiments and technology demonstrations, including studies of enhanced optical communications and measurement of atmospheric waves. The uncrewed SpaceX Dragon spacecraft is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station from the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida no earlier than Nov. 5.


Here are details on some of the research launching to the orbiting lab:

Laser Communication from Space

NASA’s ILLUMA-T investigation tests technology to provide enhanced data communication capabilities on the space station. A terminal mounted on the station’s exterior uses laser or optical communications to send high-resolution information to the agency’s Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) system, which is in geosynchronous orbit around Earth. LCRD then beams the data to optical ground stations in Haleakala, Hawaii, and Table Mountain, California. The system uses invisible infrared light and can send and receive information at higher data rates than traditional radio frequency systems, making it possible to send more images and videos to and from the space station in a single transmission. The ILLUMA-T demonstration also paves the way for placing laser communications terminals on spacecraft orbiting the Moon or Mars.

ILLUMA-T and LCRD create NASA’s first two-way laser communications relay system. Laser communications can supplement the radio frequency systems that most space-based missions currently use to send data to and from Earth. According to acting ILLUMA-T project manager Glenn Jackson at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, laser systems are smaller, more lightweight, and use less power than radio systems. The smaller size frees up more room for science instruments, the lighter weight reduces launch costs, and lower power use results in less drain on spacecraft batteries.

Managed by NASA Goddard in partnership with NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory, ILLUMA-T is funded by the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) program at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

Hardware including tangles of large orange cords and smaller white cords connecting various boxes and boards sits on a large, wheeled cart. To the right is a refrigerator-sized blue computer box topped with red and green flashing lights. A power strip runs along the wall behind.

Watching Waves in the Atmosphere

NASA’s Atmospheric Waves Experiment (AWE) uses an infrared imaging instrument to measure the characteristics, distribution, and movement of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs). These waves roll through Earth’s atmosphere when air is disturbed much like waves created by dropping a stone into water.

“Atmospheric gravity waves are one mechanism for transporting energy and momentum within the climate system and they play a role in defining the climate and its evolution,” says co-investigator Jeff Forbes of the University of Colorado Boulder. He explains that these waves are relatively small at the source but amplified at altitudes, and potentially indicate climate changes not readily observable at lower altitudes. This investigation’s long-term observations of physical processes in atmospheric circulation could increase insight into AGWs and improve understanding of Earth’s atmosphere, weather, and climate.

Researchers also are looking at how AGWs contribute to space weather, which refers to the varying conditions within the Solar System, including solar wind. Space weather affects space- and ground-based communications, navigation, and tracking systems. Scientists know little about exactly how AGWs influence space weather and this investigation could help fill in these knowledge gaps. Results could support development of ways to mitigate the effects of space weather.

The space station provides an ideal platform for the investigation given its altitude and geographic and time coverage.

“AWE is pioneering research, making the first global measurements of gravity waves at the edge of space,” Forbes says. “This is an important step forward in understanding waves in the atmosphere and their contributions to near-Earth space weather.”

The Atmospheric Waves Experiment is managed by Goddard for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters.

More science going to the space station

Space Flight Induced Ovarian and Estrogen Signaling Dysfunction, Adaptation, and Recovery is a fundamental science investigation sponsored by NASA’s Biological and Physical Sciences Division. It advances previous microgravity studies that seek to better understand the combined effects of spaceflight, nutritional, and environmental stresses on control of ovulation and resulting effects on the skeleton. Results of this study could help identify and treat the effects of stress on ovulation and improve bone health on Earth.

Aquamembrane-3, an investigation from ESA (European Space Agency), continues evaluation of replacing the multi-filtration beds used for water recovery on the space station with a type of membrane known as an Aquaporin Inside Membrane (AIM). These are membranes that incorporate proteins found in biological cells, known as aquaporins, to filter water faster while using less energy. Initial testing of AIM technology in 2015 showed that water filtration by membranes is possible in microgravity, and this follow-up testing could demonstrate how effectively the membranes eliminate contaminants in space station wastewater. Results could advance development of a complete and full-scale membrane-based water recovery system, improving water reclamation and reducing the amount of material that needs to be launched to the space station. This water filtration technology also could have applications in extreme environments on Earth, such as military and emergency settings, and for decentralized water systems in remote locations.

Gaucho Lung, sponsored by the ISS National Lab, studies how mucus lining the respiratory system affects delivery of drugs carried in a small amount of injected liquid, known as a liquid plug. Conducting this research in microgravity makes it possible to isolate the factors involved, including capillary or wicking forces, mucus characteristics, and gravity. Understanding the role of these factors could inform the development and optimization of targeted respiratory treatments. In addition, the work could contribute to new strategies to control contamination in tubing for liquids used in the health care and food industries.

Image captions:

Quote
The ILLUMA-T laser communications system being prepared for launch at Goddard Space Flight Center.
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Quote
Scientists prepare the optical assembly for AWE for launch in a clean room at Space Dynamics Laboratory facilities.
Space Dynamics Laboratory/Allison Bills

Quote
A section of ovarian tissue prepared for an investigation of ovarian function and bone health in space.
University of Kansas Medical Center

Quote
A pre-launch view of equipment for the Aquamembrane-3 investigation.
ESA

Quote
An investigator at University of California Santa Barbara prepares the camera and work light for recording images from the Gaucho Lung investigation prior to launch.
BioServe Space Technologies

Online Alexphysics

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1597
  • Spain
  • Liked: 5852
  • Likes Given: 942
The booster is returning back to the Cape for this launch. No stubby MVac

Offline Zed_Noir

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5427
  • Canada
  • Liked: 1791
  • Likes Given: 1289
NASA wants as much cargo to the ISS as possible. A Cargo Dragon don't have the mass constrains that the Crew Dragon have for launch aborts.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47410
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80264
  • Likes Given: 36320

Online Yellowstone10

YouTube copy of the CRS-29 science teleconference:


Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47410
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80264
  • Likes Given: 36320

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47410
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80264
  • Likes Given: 36320
https://twitter.com/spaceflightnow/status/1719466823572242433

Quote
The launch of a SpaceX Cargo Dragon on a space station resupply mission is slipping two days to Nov. 7, 2023: spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedul…

They say 02:16 UTC on November 8th.

Offline Ken the Bin

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2663
  • US Pacific Time Zone
    • @kenthebin@spacey.space
  • Liked: 4931
  • Likes Given: 5284

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47410
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80264
  • Likes Given: 36320

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47410
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80264
  • Likes Given: 36320
https://twitter.com/nasaspaceflight/status/1719705890624803278

Quote
NASA update:

NASA and SpaceX now are targeting 9:16 p.m. EST Tuesday, Nov. 7, for the launch of the company’s 29th commercial resupply services mission to the ISS. The additional time allows for the completion of final prelaunch processing.

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

2nd stage re-entry NOTAMs:

A1020/23 NOTAMN
Q) NTTT/QRDCA/IV/BO/W/000/999/2926S15002W150
A) NTTT
B) 2311060354 C) 2311130144
D) 06 0354-0428, 07 0332-0405, 09 0243-0317, 10 0221-0255,
11 0158-0232, 12 0136-0210, 13 0110-0144
E) TEMPORARY DANGEROUS AREA DUE TO AIRSPACE DEBRIS RE-ENTRY
IN TAHITI FIR WITHIN AN AREA BOUNDED BY
FOLLOWING POINTS :
3000S15138W-2819S14945W-2922S14847W-3000S14928W-3000S15138W
THIS ACTIVITY IMPACTS NZZO FIR AS WELL.
AIRSPACE USERS ARE ADVISED OF THE PARTICULARLY DANGEROUS
NATURE OF THE ACTIVITY AND ARE STRONGLY INVITED TO AVOID
THE AREA DURING THE ACTIVITY TIME SLOT. 
OPERATORS ARE INVITED TO FILE THEIR FLIGHT PLAN WITH
A TRAJECTORY THAT ENSURES THAT THE AREA IS CIRCUMNAVIGATED
F) SFC G) UNL


B6602/23 NOTAMN
Q) NZZO/QRDCA/IV/BO /W /000/999/3659S15923W659
A) NZZO B) 2311060350 C) 2311060430
E) TEMPO DANGER AREA NZD029 (NORTH EAST AUCKLAND OCEANIC FIR) IS
PRESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
ALL THAT AIRSPACE BOUNDED BY A LINE JOINING
30 00 00S 149 28 00 W
44 01 00S 169 58 00 W
42 59 00S 171 08 00 W
30 00 00S 151 38 00 W
30 00 00S 149 28 00 W
ACTIVITY: LAUNCH VEHICLE UPPER STAGE RETURN
USER AGENCY: FOREIGN SPACE AGENCY
PRESCRIBED PURSUANT TO CIVIL AVIATION RULE PART 71 UNDER A DELEGATED
AUTHORITY ISSUED BY THE DIRECTOR OF CIVIL AVIATION
F) SFC G) UNL
Astronomy & spaceflight geek penguin. In a relationship w/ Space Shuttle Discovery. Current Priority: Chasing the Chinese Spaceflight Wonder Egg & A Certain Chinese Mars Rover

Online Targeteer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6026
  • near hangar 18
  • Liked: 3180
  • Likes Given: 1093
Nov. 1, 2023

MEDIA ADVISORY: M23-134

NASA Sets Coverage for Next SpaceX Resupply Launch to Space Station

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the Dragon capsule soars upward after lifting off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 14, 2022, on the company’s 25th Commercial Resupply Services mission for the agency to the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 8:44 p.m. EDT. Dragon will deliver more than 5,800 pounds of cargo, including a variety of NASA investigations, to the space station. The spacecraft is expected to spend about a month attached to the orbiting outpost before it returns to Earth with research and return cargo, splashing down off the coast of Florida.

NASA/Kim Shiflett

NASA and SpaceX are targeting 9:16 p.m. EST Tuesday, Nov. 7, to launch the company’s 29th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station from Launch Complex 39A at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Live launch coverage will air on NASA Television, the NASA app, YouTube, and on the agency’s website, with prelaunch events starting Monday, Nov. 6. Learn how to stream NASA TV through a variety of platforms.

SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft will deliver new science investigations, food, supplies, and equipment to the international crew, including NASA’s AWE (Atmospheric Waves Experiment), which studies atmospheric gravity waves to understand the flow of energy through Earth’s upper atmosphere and space.

The spacecraft also will deliver NASA’s ILLUMA-T (Integrated Laser Communications Relay Demonstration Low-Earth-Orbit User Modem and Amplifier Terminal), which aims to test high data rate laser communications from the space station to Earth via the agency’s LCRD (Laser Communications Relay Demonstration). Together, ILLUMA-T and LCRD will complete NASA’s first two-way, end-to-end laser communications relay system.

Arrival to the station is planned for shortly before 12 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 9. The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft will dock autonomously to the forward-facing port of the station’s Harmony module.

The spacecraft is expected to spend about a month attached to the orbital outpost before it returns to Earth with research and return cargo, splashing down off the coast of Florida.

The deadline has passed for media accreditation for in-person coverage of this launch. The agency’s media accreditation policy is available online. More information about media accreditation is available by emailing: [email protected].

Full coverage of this mission is as follows (all times Eastern and subject to change based on operations) Follow the International Space Station blog for updates.

Monday, Nov. 6

7:30 p.m. – Prelaunch media teleconference (no earlier than one hour after completion of the Launch Readiness Review) with the following participants:

    Dana Weigel, deputy program manager, International Space Station Program
    Meghan Everett, deputy chief scientist, International Space Station Program Research Office
    Sarah Walker, director, Dragon mission management, SpaceX
    Melody Lovin, launch weather officer, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s 45th Weather Squadron

Media may ask questions during the media teleconference by phone only. For the dial-in number and passcode, please contact the Kennedy newsroom no later than 5 p.m. EST Monday, Nov. 6, at: [email protected]

Tuesday, Nov. 7

8:45 p.m. – NASA TV launch commentary begins

9:16 p.m. – Launch

Thursday, Nov. 9

10:15 a.m. – NASA TV coverage begins for Dragon docking to the space station

Coverage is subject to change based on real-time operational activities. Follow the International Space Station blog for updates.

NASA Television launch coverage

Live coverage of the launch on NASA Television will begin at 8:45 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 7. For downlink information, schedules, and links to streaming video, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Audio only of the news conferences and launch coverage will be carried on the NASA “V” circuits, which may be accessed by dialing 321-867-1220, -1240, or -7135. On launch day, the full mission broadcast can be heard on -1220 and -1240, while the countdown net only can be heard on -7135 beginning approximately one hour before the mission broadcast begins.

On launch day, live coverage of the launch without NASA Television commentary will be carried on the NASA Television media channel.

NASA website launch coverage

Launch day coverage of the mission will be available on the NASA website. Coverage will include live streaming and blog updates beginning no earlier than 8:45 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 7, as the countdown milestones occur. On-demand streaming video and photos of the launch will be available shortly after liftoff. For questions about countdown coverage, contact the NASA Kennedy newsroom at 321-867-2468. Follow countdown coverage on our launch blog for updates.

Attend launch virtually

Members of the public can register to attend this launch virtually. Registrants will receive mission updates and activities by email. NASA’s virtual guest program for this mission also includes curated launch resources, notifications about related opportunities, and a virtual guest passport stamp following a successful launch.

Watch, engage on social media

Let people know you're following the mission on X, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtags #Dragon and #CRS29. You can also stay connected by following and tagging these accounts:

X: @NASA, @NASAKennedy, @NASASocial, @Space_Station, ISS_Research, @ISS National Lab

Facebook: NASA, NASAKennedy, ISS, ISS National Lab

Instagram: @NASA, @NASAKennedy, @ISS, @ISSNationalLab

Learn more about NASA’s SpaceX commercial resupply services missions at:

https://www.nasa.gov/spacex
« Last Edit: 11/01/2023 07:08 pm by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Zed_Noir

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5427
  • Canada
  • Liked: 1791
  • Likes Given: 1289
Will they have a post-launch tele-conference?

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47410
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80264
  • Likes Given: 36320
https://twitter.com/spaceflightnow/status/1720201621630505212

Quote
NASA's CRS-29 mission is slipping another two days to Nov. 9. This is the third delay for this mission without any detailed explanation from SpaceX or NASA: spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedul…

Offline zubenelgenubi

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11018
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Sometimes it feels like Trantor in the time of Hari Seldon
  • Liked: 7298
  • Likes Given: 70431
Quote from: SFN tweet
NASA's CRS-29 mission is slipping another two days to Nov. 9. This is the third delay for this mission without any detailed explanation from SpaceX or NASA: spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule

SFN Launch Schedule, updated November 2:
10 November 01:28 UTC = 9 November 8:28 pm EST
« Last Edit: 11/02/2023 10:00 pm by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.) My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!" Yes, there are God-given rights. Do you wish to gainsay the Declaration of Independence?

Online Targeteer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6026
  • near hangar 18
  • Liked: 3180
  • Likes Given: 1093
Will they have a post-launch tele-conference?

Don't bet on it.  "check our blogs for mission updates" is now the standard NASA response.  See the notes above that neither SpaceX or NASA have provided detailed reasons for two delays...
« Last Edit: 11/02/2023 10:15 pm by zubenelgenubi »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Online Yellowstone10

See the notes above that neither SpaceX or NASA have provided detailed reasons for two delays...

Got a bit of an explanation in today's blog post:

Quote
NASA and SpaceX now are targeting 8:28 p.m. EST, Nov. 9, for launch of the company’s 29th commercial resupply services (CRS-29) mission to the International Space Station. The additional time allows for completion of final prelaunch closeout ahead of liftoff of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon cargo spacecraft from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Prior to every Dragon mission, SpaceX conducts extensive prelaunch checkouts at every stage of refurbishment and final integration to ensure the spacecraft is ready to safely fly its next mission. During the initial propellant load in preparation for the CRS-29 mission, teams identified a leak of NTO (nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer) in a Draco thruster valve, which per standard procedure required a pause to the operation to troubleshoot. The team inspected the valve and respective data, and decided to replace the thruster.

SpaceX continues to keep NASA informed throughout the process and the joint team collectively decided to shift launch to account for the initial part replacement and subsequent system checkouts and data reviews.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2023/11/02/health-checks-and-science-on-station-spacex-adjusts-launch-date/

Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Margaritaville Beach Resort South Padre Island
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
1