Author Topic: SpaceX F9 : Intuitive Machines IM-1 : KSC LC-39A : 15 Feb 2024 (06:05 UTC)  (Read 453858 times)

Offline zubenelgenubi

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SFN Three robotic missions target Moon landings over one week in January, December 6, by Will Robinson-Smith
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As it happens, the last lander scheduled to launch could be the first to touch down on the Moon. Intuitive Machine’s Nova-C lander is targeting liftoff between Jan. 12-16 and is set to land at the Moon’s South Pole (80.297°S, 1.2613°E) on either Jan. 19 or 21.

A spokesperson for Intuitive Machines said the landing opportunity for both days is in the afternoon in EST.

Trent Martin, the Vice President of Lunar Access at Intuitive Machines, told Spaceflight Now in an Oct. 27 interview that they have instantaneous launch opportunities each day during their January window. He said because their lander needs to be fueled at the launch pad, crews will perform a wet dress rehearsal several days ahead of launch.

Quote from: Jeff Foust tweet,  Dec 14
Slides from a presentation from NASA's Joel Kearns show a Jan. 19 or 21 landing for the IM-1 lunar lander assuming a launch Jan. 12-16, and a Jan. 25 landing for Peregrine if it launches Dec. 24-26. And that Peregrine launch will be in the middle of the night at the Cape…

I would be interested in learning when the instantaneous launch windows are, even if they are not yet computed to high precision.
« Last Edit: 12/07/2023 11:46 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline GewoonLukas_

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NET January 13th at ~04:00 UTC

Ben Cooper (Updated December 9th)
Quote
A Falcon 9 will launch the Intuitive Machines IM-1 Nova-C lunar lander to the moon from pad 39A on January 12 around 11 p.m. EST.
https://www.launchphotography.com/Launch_Viewing_Guide.html

Edit to add:

NextSpaceflight (Updated December 9th)
Launch NET January 13th, 2024, at 03:47 UTC
https://nextspaceflight.com/launches/details/1915
« Last Edit: 12/09/2023 06:27 pm by GewoonLukas_ »
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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How late can USSF-52/OTV-7 launch before disrupting the January launch window?
https://arstechnica.com/space/2023/12/technical-problems-ground-spacex-launch-of-us-military-spaceplane/ [Dec 13]

Quote from: Stephen Clark
This is expected to push back the launch until at least late December, perhaps longer. SpaceX and Space Force officials have not divulged details about the problems causing the delay.

Also, from the same article:
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SpaceX called off a launch attempt Monday night at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to resolve a problem with a ground system. A senior Space Force official told Ars on Wednesday that additional issues will cause an additional delay in the launch.

“We’re working through a couple of technical glitches with our SpaceX team that just are going to take a little bit more time to work through," said Col. James Horne, deputy director of the Space Force's Assured Access to Space directorate. "We haven’t nailed down a specific launch date yet, but we’re going to have to roll back into the HIF (Horizontal Integration Facility) and work through some things on the rocket.”

Horne, a senior leader on the Space Force team overseeing military launches like this one, said the ground equipment problem that prevented liftoff Monday night could be fixed as soon as Wednesday. But it will take longer to resolve other issues he declined to specify. "We found some things that we need to run some analysis on, so that’s what’s driving the delay," he said.
Same article:
Quote
It usually takes a couple of weeks to reconfigure LC-39A between Falcon Heavy and Falcon 9 launches. The Falcon Heavy is significantly more powerful, with three Falcon 9 first-stage boosters connected together to haul more massive payloads into orbit.
Remember to factor in IM-1 Wet Dress Rehearsal.
« Last Edit: 12/13/2023 11:05 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline PM3

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February Falcon 9 • IM-1
Launch time: TBD

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

[Updated Dec 17]
« Last Edit: 12/19/2023 06:34 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline PM3

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Intuitive Machines IM-1 Lunar Mission Launch Update

Intuitive Machines, Inc. (Nasdaq: LUNR, LUNRW) (“Intuitive Machines”) (“Company”), a leading space exploration, infrastructure, and services company, announced in coordination with SpaceX, launch of the Company’s IM-1 lunar mission is now targeted for a multi-day launch window that opens no earlier than mid-February 2024. The updated window comes after unfavorable weather conditions resulted in shifts in the SpaceX launch manifest.

The mid-February launch window is the next available opportunity to launch IM-1 given the monthly lunar blackout period; the IM-1 mission Nova-C lunar lander is targeted to land near the south pole of the Moon, requiring specific lighting conditions that are only available for a handful of days each month.

The Company’s IM-1 mission Nova-C lunar lander remains ready. As previously announced, Intuitive Machines delivered its IM-1 mission Nova-C lunar lander to Cape Canaveral, Florida, earlier this month. Since arriving in Florida, the IM-1 lunar lander has completed major system tests, verification, and certification milestones and is prepared for integration with SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket.

The Intuitive Machines IM-1 mission will be the Company’s first attempted lunar landing as part of NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services (“CLPS”) initiative, a key part of NASA’s Artemis lunar exploration efforts. The science and technology payloads sent to the Moon’s surface as part of CLPS intend to lay the foundation for human missions and a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface.

https://www.intuitivemachines.com/post/intuitive-machines-im-1-lunar-mission-launch-update
[Dec 19]
« Last Edit: 01/23/2024 08:47 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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T-4 minutes. Strongback is retracting.
this fairing looks odd is it im1 fairing before mission for testing. Im1 propellant I don't know do anyone knows if throw fairing it this fairing maybe.
/cross post

What is the spot where we connect the methane umbilical cord and successfully remove it from lander. I don't know the mechanism of propellant loading in this case.

Offline GewoonLukas_

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Ben Cooper (Updated December 29th)
Targeting February 10th
Quote
A Falcon 9 will launch the Intuitive Machines IM-1 Nova-C lunar lander from pad 39A on February 10.
https://www.launchphotography.com/Launch_Viewing_Guide.html
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Offline PM3

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Ben Cooper (Updated December 29th)
Targeting February 10th
Quote
A Falcon 9 will launch the Intuitive Machines IM-1 Nova-C lunar lander from pad 39A on February 10.
https://www.launchphotography.com/Launch_Viewing_Guide.html

This translates to a landing date of ~ February 17, six days before Peregrine. IM-1 is in the lead again for the first American Moon landing since Apollo 17.

For comparison, all the dates:

Schedule         Launch         Landing

Peregrine old    24 Dec 2023    25 Jan 2024
Peregrine new     8 Jan 2023    23 Feb 2024
IM-1 old         13 Jan 2023    19 Jan 2024
IM-1 new         10 Feb 2023   ~17 Feb 2024


Peregrine runs on hypergolic propellants, therefore is free to chose the launch date and linger in Lunar orbit, test the spacecraft and chose the best moment for landing. Nova-C runs on cryogenic Methalox, therefore will go fast to minimize propellant boil-off. Nova-C can operate for a full Lunar day (14 Earthy days) on lunar surface, therefore targets Lunar sunrise and launches ~ 1 week before. Peregrine operates for max. 10 days on the Moon, therefore can afford to land later. Another reason to land later is that their landing site is 42 degress to the West of IM, where sun rises later (like on Earth).
« Last Edit: 12/31/2023 03:10 pm by PM3 »
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Offline GewoonLukas_

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Ben Cooper (Updated December 29th)
Targeting February 10th
Quote
A Falcon 9 will launch the Intuitive Machines IM-1 Nova-C lunar lander from pad 39A on February 10.
https://www.launchphotography.com/Launch_Viewing_Guide.html

This translates to a landing date of ~ February 17, six days before Peregrine. IM-1 is in the lead again for the first American Moon landing since Apollo 17.

Landing scheduled for No Later Then February 22nd:

Quote
Looks like we have ourselves a bit of a moon race, folks. In a statement, Intuitive Machines just said that its "mid-February launch window results in lunar landing dates intended for February 22, 2024, or before." So it would land a day before before Astrobotic's Peregrine.

https://twitter.com/wapodavenport/status/1743391354510561518
« Last Edit: 01/05/2024 09:04 pm by GewoonLukas_ »
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Offline PM3

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Launch window ~ 10-15 February, landing ~ 17-22?
"Never, never be afraid of the truth." -- Jim Bridenstine

Offline Phil Stooke

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They will want to land shortly after sunrise at their landing site.  That's what fixes the date. The sun rises at Malapert A on about the 18th but it might be the 20th before shadows are reduced enough at that latitude for a safe landing.  They did say 'the 22nd or before'.  The sun rises at the Gruithuisen site for Astrobotic on the 21st and they also have to wait for shadows to be reduced, so the landing cameras can be used for navigation.

I have serious trust issues on
1) NASA allowing viper on Griffin lander the very  next Astrobotic Technology mission?
2) seeing traditional propellant system fail, will im-1 with cryogenic propellants succeed?

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[...]

Landing scheduled for No Later Then February 22nd:

Quote
Looks like we have ourselves a bit of a moon race, folks. In a statement, Intuitive Machines just said that its "mid-February launch window results in lunar landing dates intended for February 22, 2024, or before." So it would land a day before before Astrobotic's Peregrine.

twitter.com/wapodavenport/status/1743391354510561518

With the equivocal/uncertain outcome of SLIM, it looks like IM-1 might claim the "first fully successful landing of 2024" prize. (Chandrayaan-3 was in 2023; Chang'e 5 was in 2020. Am I missing any in between?)

Is there a publicly available source explicitly stating the mission requires a wet dress rehearsal? And is that "wet" for the lander as well? Is there an anticipated date for that?
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Offline GewoonLukas_

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Is there a publicly available source explicitly stating the mission requires a wet dress rehearsal? And is that "wet" for the lander as well? Is there an anticipated date for that?

See this post upthread:

Also SFN Intuitive Machines targets launch to the Moon in mid-January, October 27, by Will Robinson-Smith
Quote
Trent Martin, the Vice President of Lunar Access at Intuitive Machines:
The special accommodations are because the IM-1 lander uses a propellant mix of liquid oxygen and liquid methane and needs to be fueled at the launch pad in the run-up to launch.

But to do that, they need to have access to the payload, which is where the crew and cargo access tower comes into play. Another such tower is in the works at SLC-40, but it won’t be fully operational in time for this mission.

We actually do a wet dress rehearsal several days before the launch. So we will actually do a full fuel of our vehicle to ensure we have the timeline down," Martin said. “We want to fuel as late as possible. SpaceX has been very accommodating and they’re providing us a service that gives us liquid oxygen, liquid methane. They’ll fill up until the very last minute, so that we’re as full as possible and we have the highest chance of success at landing on the Moon.”
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Online DanClemmensen

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Also SFN Intuitive Machines targets launch to the Moon in mid-January, October 27, by Will Robinson-Smith
Quote
Trent Martin, the Vice President of Lunar Access at Intuitive Machines:
The special accommodations are because the IM-1 lander uses a propellant mix of liquid oxygen and liquid methane and needs to be fueled at the launch pad in the run-up to launch.

But to do that, they need to have access to the payload, which is where the crew and cargo access tower comes into play. Another such tower is in the works at SLC-40, but it won’t be fully operational in time for this mission.

We actually do a wet dress rehearsal several days before the launch. So we will actually do a full fuel of our vehicle to ensure we have the timeline down," Martin said. “We want to fuel as late as possible. SpaceX has been very accommodating and they’re providing us a service that gives us liquid oxygen, liquid methane. They’ll fill up until the very last minute, so that we’re as full as possible and we have the highest chance of success at landing on the Moon.”
After the Starship IFT-1 and other Starship kabooms, SpaceX decided to massively enhance the CO2 purge system to make sure to avoid any issues with methalox leaks into a semi-enclosed space.

Apparently, IM-1 will be late-loaded with methalox inside the fairing, which I think qualifies as an enclosed space. Presumably, just about every engineer at SpaceX and at IM have already thought about this. Have we seen anything about how they purge the fairing during and after late fueling?

Offline GewoonLukas_

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It appears that SpaceX may be testing the TE at 39A with the new connections that should allow @Int_Machines's Nova-C lander to be loaded with propellants while on the pad. The lander uses cryogenic oxygen and methane fluids for its propulsion system.

nsf.live/spacecoast

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The the location of this vent is higher up on the strongback than the usual vent we see for the Stage 2 liquid oxygen connection. It would seem reasonable to assume that, since this is higher up, this is for cryogenic connections to the Falcon 9 fairing.

Quote
Such connections will be in use during the countdown for that mission as SpaceX plans to fill up the lander during the countdown while on the pad. It's gonna be interesting to see how it all pans out in the end but really great to see SpaceX is already testing this.

https://twitter.com/Alexphysics13/status/1749086851254591511?t=9DZV9_nwYgkfAH1xyxl-9g&s=19

https://twitter.com/Alexphysics13/status/1749086856015122554?t=iUFD7ReCYGxOYRggTFD5pA&s=19
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Offline Robotbeat

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A cryogenic landing will be a first. No other Moon (or Mars, for that matter) lander has used cryo fuel.

I hope this works. This would help dispel a lot of unease about cryo fuel for larger landers, too.

(Would take the wind out of the sails of calls for “traditional” hypergolic landers for HLS, too. There aren’t any real large hypergol engines in production right now that would be suitable for a lunar lander. There are several methane/LOx, kerolox, hydrolox engines that are.)
« Last Edit: 01/22/2024 07:11 am by Robotbeat »
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I hope this works. This would help dispel a lot of unease about cryo fuel for larger landers, too.

Me too; fingers crossed! How do pressure-fed methalox stages scale? (See attached Nova-C sizing.) Can designers simply multiply all those values by a single constant value, or does e.g. pressurized helium not work that way?
« Last Edit: 01/22/2024 09:02 am by sdsds »
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Offline Lampyridae

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I hope this works. This would help dispel a lot of unease about cryo fuel for larger landers, too.

Me too; fingers crossed! How do pressure-fed methalox stages scale? (See attached Nova-C sizing.) Can designers simply multiply all those values by a single constant value, or does e.g. pressurized helium not work that way?

For Kerbal purposes, it's mostly a linear scaling of tank mass if it's the same pressure. Might help with boiloff since that is governed by the inverse-square law.

Those propellant masses are weird, though. 845kg CH4 should correspond to about 3000kg LOX at 1:3.6.
« Last Edit: 01/22/2024 11:02 am by Lampyridae »

Tags: im-1 Falcon 9 Moon 
 

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