Author Topic: SpaceX F9: Space Norway ASBM : VSFB SLC-4E : mid 2024  (Read 22428 times)

Offline Alexphysics

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Space Norway Discussion thread

NSF Threads for Space Norway : Discussion

Launch 2024 on Falcon 9 from Vandenberg.

Pair of satellites with total wet mass of 7200kg, an operational 8076 x 43,536km, 62.6 degree orbit.

https://twitter.com/pbdes/status/1146432919285747712
Quote
Space Norway contracts w/ @Inmarsat to launch 2 @northropgrumman-built triple-band satellites to HEO orbit on a @SpaceX Falcon 9 in 2022; @usairforce to provide EHF payload; Inmarsat will use Ka-band & Space Norway X-band for Arctic coverage.


their website:

Quote
Space Norway will cooperate with the satellite operator Inmarsat and the Norwegian Ministry of Defence to offer mobile broadband coverage to civilian and military users in the Arctic. Two satellites will be built by Northrop Grumman and are scheduled to be launched by SpaceX in late 2022. The ground station will be established in North Norway and ensure Norwegian control of this critically important capability.

“This will be a milestone for people in the Arctic who have very limited or no broadband access in the region” says Jostein Rønneberg, Space Norway ́s CEO.“We are building a robust communications capability in an area strategically important to Norway and our partners. This will be vital for surveillance, fishery control and rescue operations in the vast sea area that is under Norwegian control, and will significantly improve our ability to operate in the High North”.

Space Norway, a limited liability company owned by the Norwegian government, has established a new subsidiary company, Space Norway HEOSAT AS, to manage the program and operate the two satellites together with Kongsberg Satellites Services in Tromsø, Norway. The program is fully financed with customer agreements in place for the service life of the satellites.

“After a multi-year dedicated effort, we are both proud and happy to have closed customer agreements with Inmarsat and with the Norwegian and US militaries”, saysthe Program Director Kjell-Ove Skare. “This is an exciting collaborative effort, which ensures a cost effective solution for all parties. Now we are eager to start the real work of building the satellites and the ground stations. We look forward to providingthe world’s first and only mobile broadband service in the Artic region; somethingwhich has long been an important objective for the Norwegian authorities.”

Both satellites will be launched in late 2022 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket into a Highly Elliptical Orbit (HEO), which will provide full coverage from 65 degrees North,

which in practical terms is the area North of the Arctic Circle. Each of the two satellites will carry multiple payloads, and the system is scheduled to be operational for at least 15 years with users able to switch between current geostationary satellites and the HEO satellites. Each satellite will have a mass of 2000 kg and provide 6 kWatt power through their sun arrays.



Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)  /   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles  /  SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)
   L2 SpaceX SectionFrom
« Last Edit: 11/21/2023 04:00 pm by gongora »

Online gongora

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So I have some questions about this Space Norway launch.  I don't have a subscription to PBdeS's web site so maybe someone who can read it might get more information:

This launch is using Inmarsat's old contract with SpaceX?  The tweet said Space Norway got the launch through Inmarsat.

63 degrees is in that tweener region between Cape Canaveral and Vandenberg.  Which site is the more likely location for the launch?
« Last Edit: 07/03/2019 04:40 pm by gongora »

Offline Barley

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63 degrees is in that tweener region between Cape Canaveral and Vandenberg.  Which site is the more likely location for the launch?
I believe these will be in 90 degree inclination orbits.  Essentially hovering over the north pole at apogee to cover the entire arctic north of ~63 degrees.  So either Vandenberg or south from Cape Canaveral if that option becomes available.

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63 degrees is in that tweener region between Cape Canaveral and Vandenberg.  Which site is the more likely location for the launch?
I believe these will be in 90 degree inclination orbits.  Essentially hovering over the north pole at apogee to cover the entire arctic north of ~63 degrees.  So either Vandenberg or south from Cape Canaveral if that option becomes available.

Their FCC documentation said 63.4 degree orbit.

« Last Edit: 07/03/2019 04:25 pm by gongora »

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Isn't that a classical Molniya orbit? Wow, I think this is the first commercial Molniya orbit comsat that is not from Russia!

For NRO Molniya orbit payload both the Cape and Vandenberg have been used, although Vandenberg seems to have been used more in recent years (NRO L-35/42).
Astronomy & spaceflight geek penguin. In a relationship w/ Space Shuttle Discovery. Current Priority: Chasing the Chinese Spaceflight Wonder Egg & A Certain Chinese Mars Rover

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[Northrop Grumman] Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission Satellite System demonstrates Northrop Grumman’s integrated approach to mission success

Dulles, Va. – July 3, 2019 – Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC) has been awarded a contract by Space Norway to deliver its Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission (ASBM) system. Northrop Grumman will design, manufacture and integrate two satellites in addition to providing critical ground infrastructure.

The ASBM satellites will carry multiple hosted payloads including an X-Band payload for the Norwegian Ministry of Defense and a Ka-Band payload for Inmarsat. Northrop Grumman announced last year that it will also provide two Extremely High Frequency eXtended Data Rate (EHF XDR) payloads for the Enhanced Polar System-Recapitalization (EPS-R) to the U.S. Air Force for integration on the spacecraft. The systems are designed to improve secure and continuous communications in the North Polar Region. Additionally, Northrop Grumman was selected to provide critical ground infrastructure for EPS-R.

“This contract award marks our first mission with Space Norway and we appreciate the confidence they have in our capabilities to deliver high quality communication satellites,” said Frank DeMauro, sector vice president and general manager, space systems, Northrop Grumman. “By using our flight proven GeoStar platform coupled with our end-to-end payload integration capabilities, we are eager to demonstrate our ability to provide innovative solutions that regularly exceed our customer’s mission needs.”

ASBM’s satellite system will be designed, built and tested at Northrop Grumman’s state-of-the-art satellite manufacturing facility in Dulles. The satellites will be based on the company’s proven GEOStar platform which has been integrated on more than 40 spacecraft. ASBM is scheduled for a dual launch in late 2022.

Space Norway was established in 2014 as a limited liability, governmentally owned company.

Northrop Grumman is a leading global security company providing innovative systems, products and solutions in autonomous systems, cyber, C4ISR, space, strike, and logistics and modernization to customers worldwide. Please visit news.northropgrumman.com and follow us on Twitter, @NGCNews, for more information.
« Last Edit: 07/03/2019 06:03 pm by gongora »

Offline Barley

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Isn't that a classical Molniya orbit? Wow, I think this is the first commercial Molniya orbit comsat that is not from Russia!
This is not a Molniya orbit.

The orbits are related in that each is highly eccentric.  In each orbits the satellite remains fairly stationary near apogee for most of the orbit, and multiple satellites are needed for continuous coverage.

However a Molniya orbit has an inclination of 63 degrees and serves a circle centered on a point 63 degrees north touching the pole on one edge and perhaps 45N on the opposite side.  it does not cover the entire arctic.  In contrast a polar orbit would serve the area of the arctic circle centered on 90 degrees north.

Also because the service area from a Moliniya is not centered on the pole the parameters of the orbit must be chosen so the orbit is Geo-synchronous and the apogee returns to the same spot.  So a Moliniya orbit is fairly specific.  On the other hand any high eccentricity polar orbit can serve the arctic because of rotational symmetry around the pole, geo-synchronous is not required.

Offline Comga

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Isn't that a classical Molniya orbit? Wow, I think this is the first commercial Molniya orbit comsat that is not from Russia!
This is not a Molniya orbit.

The orbits are related in that each is highly eccentric.  In each orbits the satellite remains fairly stationary near apogee for most of the orbit, and multiple satellites are needed for continuous coverage.

However a Molniya orbit has an inclination of 63 degrees and serves a circle centered on a point 63 degrees north touching the pole on one edge and perhaps 45N on the opposite side.  it does not cover the entire arctic.  In contrast a polar orbit would serve the area of the arctic circle centered on 90 degrees north.

Also because the service area from a Moliniya is not centered on the pole the parameters of the orbit must be chosen so the orbit is Geo-synchronous and the apogee returns to the same spot.  So a Moliniya orbit is fairly specific.  On the other hand any high eccentricity polar orbit can serve the arctic because of rotational symmetry around the pole, geo-synchronous is not required.

I believe your description is incorrect.
A Molniya orbit is a12 hr orbit at the 63 and a fraction degree inclination where the rate of rotation of the line of apsides goes to zero. That way the apogee, which is set at the northernmost point, stays there, rather than rotating away.
But they are only at 63 N for a moment, and then go to 63 South, once per orbit.
If a satellite is at any higher (or lower) inclination, including 90 degrees, then it’s apogee will roll around the orbit. That won’t serve the purpose of remaining high in the sky for extended fractions of a day.
These orbits are not “geosynchronous”. They move across the sky and must be actively tracked.
But one of a pair it trio is always above the horizon and they’re a lot closer than GEO.
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline smoliarm

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First, I agree with Comga; Barley's description of Molniya orbit is different from what I remember from Orbital Mechanics (which I passed with "A", but some 20+ years ago).

Second, about the orbit itself:
Space Norway says in their press release it will be - Highly Elliptical Orbit with 43000 km Apogee and 8000 km Perigee. Which does not fit Molniya's semi-major axis.
Also, SpaceNews in this article
https://spacenews.com/northrop-grumman-to-build-two-triple-payload-satellites-for-space-norway-spacex-to-launch/
says the orbit is UNIQUE.
Finally, FCC filing says the inclination will be 63.4°.
So, if everything above is correct, it is going to be a "Molniya-like orbit" - with high eccentricity and same inclination, BUT with different orbital period.
If (again) the apogee and perigee numbers are correct, the period will be 941.6 min, or approx 0.66 of sidereal day.
Which is remarkably close to 2/3 (0.666...)
Satellite in Molniya orbit appears above northern hemisphere twice per day, first around "N" latitude and second around "N+180" latitude (and this is why the same sat in Molniya orbit CAN in fact serve ALL northern regions - but not at the same time).
Satellite in this ASBM-Molniya-like orbit will appear above northern hemisphere three times per two days - in points spaced by 120° by latitude.

Third, about launch site:
63.4° inclination can be reached directly from VAFB. From Cape there is an option to launch ASBM satellites into "transfer orbit", something like 400 km x 43000 km @ 57.5° inclination. In this case satellites have make apogee burn for perigee raising AND gaining remaining 6° to inclination. At this height - 43000 km - it should not take a lot of delta-V. Atleast in 2004 Quasar-15 (launched by Atlas-IIAS from Cape) did the same trick.
Another option for launch from Cape is a "dog-leg", for which Falcon 9 will probably have enough performance since the total payload is about 4000 kg.

Edit - corrected typo.
« Last Edit: 07/04/2019 12:55 pm by smoliarm »


Offline Steven Pietrobon

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The satellites are called ASBM (Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission). Perhaps someone can rename the thread.

https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/asbm-1.htm
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline baldusi

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Te orbit is called Tundra Orbit, a sibling of Molnyia but geosynchronous, it goes over a single point rather than two.

Offline Comga

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Te orbit is called Tundra Orbit, a sibling of Molnyia but geosynchronous, it goes over a single point rather than two.

That doesn't seem right
It is related to the Molniya orbit, with that special inclination.
But as smoliarm said, it appears (hovers briefly) "over" three different spots around the north pole.
It is NOT geosynchronous is the classical sense that it doe not remain synchronized with the earth's motion at all times.
It's ground track loops around the world.
That ground track does repeat with a period of three days.
(If having an integer number of days between repeat cycles made it "geosynchronous", then ALL orbits would be geosynchronous, just with number much larger than one.)

(Ha, smoliarm!  I think I passed Orbital Mechanics 401 some 30+ years ago, but can't remember my grade.)
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline baldusi

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Te orbit is called Tundra Orbit, a sibling of Molnyia but geosynchronous, it goes over a single point rather than two.

That doesn't seem right
It is related to the Molniya orbit, with that special inclination.
But as smoliarm said, it appears (hovers briefly) "over" three different spots around the north pole.
It is NOT geosynchronous is the classical sense that it doe not remain synchronized with the earth's motion at all times.
It's ground track loops around the world.
That ground track does repeat with a period of three days.
(If having an integer number of days between repeat cycles made it "geosynchronous", then ALL orbits would be geosynchronous, just with number much larger than one.)

(Ha, smoliarm!  I think I passed Orbital Mechanics 401 some 30+ years ago, but can't remember my grade.)

Go and check Tundra orbits and Japan's QZSS. The reason it is 2/3rd of a day is to be able to put 3 satellites to give continuous coverage at very high inclinations. The racetrack wrt fixed-Earth reference frame is fixed, it looks like an elongated 8. So I do consider it geosynchronous, just not at 1:1. I very specifically said geosynchronous and not geostationary.
Molnyia can be made to have two or three peaks in it's Earth-fixed racetrack. Northern Hemisphere users obviously prefer the 2 peaks. But I've always speculated about a 3 peak Molnyia for the Southern Hemisphere so Argentina, Chile, Australia, NZ and South Africa could have communications close to their antarctic bases. Regrettably you'd need 12 birds for that.

Offline smoliarm

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Ok, once again, I've passed exam in Orbital Mechanics a LONG time ago.
Therefore it's possible I forgot something important.
However, here is what I seem to remember, in somewhat random order:
1.
Tundra orbits BELONG to the type called "geosynchronous"
2.
All Geosynchronous orbits have orbital period STRICTLY EQUAL to Earth's sidereal period (which is 24 hrs minus ~ 4 min, IMSMR). Therefore, All Geosynchronous orbits have STRICTLY defined semi-major axis, which one can calculate from 3d Kepler's Law.
3.
Tundra orbits include those geosynchronous orbits with inclination of ~ 63°

Now, on this particular orbit for Space Norway satellites:
If we assume the apogee (43000 km) and perigee (8000 km) reported by company ARE correct -
- then this orbit DOES NOT belong to Tundra family, nor it belongs to Molniya orbits.

And one more thing on *orbit names* - (again, IIRC) -
Let's denote satellite period as *Ts* and planet rotation period as *Tp*.
Now, if the ratio Tp/Ts can be represented by some (small) INTEGERS - then such orbit will be called *Phase-Locked*
In other words:
GEO = Phase-Locked with Tp/Ts of 1:1
Molniya = Phase-Locked with Tp/Ts of 2:1
"Space Norway orbit" = Phase-Locked with Tp/Ts of 3:2

Offline Yiosie

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Cross-post:

Launch of Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission (ASBM) satellites delayed from late 2022 to early 2023:

USSF’s EPS-R Program on Schedule for Historic Polar Mission [dated Oct. 29] (bolds mine)

Quote
LOS ANGELES AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- A unique partnership with Norway and the U.S. Space Force’s Space Systems Command will extend satellite communications for U.S. polar forces and save taxpayers millions of dollars.
 
SSC’s Enhanced Polar Systems-Recapitalization (EPS-R) program successfully completed the ready-to-ship review at the end of September for the first of two payloads to begin the integration process onto Space Norway’s space vehicles.
 
EPS-R is an Extremely High Frequency (EHF) MILSATCOM system designed to extend EPS (legacy) services into the early/mid-2030s. Its mission serves to provide 24/7 protected satellite communications for U.S. polar forces operating in the Arctic region.
 
<snip>
 
Using a host space vehicle like Space Norway means it is imperative the SSC team meets its scheduled deadlines to coordinate with Space Norway, Philichi said. The second payload is expected to hit its ready-to-ship milestone just before Thanksgiving.

<snip>

Hosting the EPS-R payload on the Norwegian Artic Satellite Broadband Mission (ASBM) is projected to save the USSF more than $900 million dollars, and deliver Satellite Communication capability to the polar region three years faster than a traditional satellite acquisition program.
 
“Norway is a key U.S. ally in the polar region, and because of technology mitigation, the technical risk is low for integrating a National Security Space payload on their Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission (ASBM),” Leach noted.
 
By January 2022, EPS-R plans to have both of its Northrop Grumman-built payloads complete. The program is on track for a dual launch with Space Norway scheduled for early 2023.

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Space Systems Command (SSC) delivered the first of two Enhanced
Polar Systems-Recapitalization (EPS-R) payloads to begin integration on Space Norway’s Arctic
Satellite Broadband Mission host space vehicles. The second payload is expected to be delivered
for integration onto the second host space vehicle by the end of July 2022.

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This article mentions "next Fall" for the launch from Vandenberg.

[High North News] Takes Network Coverage in the Arctic to New Heights
« Last Edit: 09/22/2022 11:29 pm by gongora »

Quote
MAR 30   To be announced   Falcon 9   SLC-4E   Vehicle will launch the Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission into orbit

https://www.spacearchive.info/vafbsked.htm

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Quote
MAR 30   To be announced   Falcon 9   SLC-4E   Vehicle will launch the Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission into orbit

https://www.spacearchive.info/vafbsked.htm

That's obviously just a placeholder date, and unlikely to even be in the ballpark

Quote
MAR 30   To be announced   Falcon 9   SLC-4E   Vehicle will launch the Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission into orbit

https://www.spacearchive.info/vafbsked.htm

That's obviously just a placeholder date, and unlikely to even be in the ballpark

Same for the SARah 2 & 3 flight listed as Dec 30?

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Final Arctic Protected Satellite Communications Payload Delivered for Integration on International Host Vehicle

EL SEGUNDO, Calif. – Space Systems Command’s Military Communication and Positioning, Navigation and Timing Directorate recently delivered the second of two Enhanced Polar System Recapitalization (EPS-R) payloads to begin integration on Space Norway’s Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission host space vehicles.

The EPS-R payloads, built by Northrop Grumman at its Space Park campus in Redondo Beach, California, supports a first-of-its-kind program - a U.S. Government payload being hosted on a commercially procured international host satellite.

“This delivery marked a major milestone towards the launch of the EPS-R satellite program to provide vital protected satellite communications to the warfighter in the increasingly important arctic region,” said 2nd Lt. Clayton Lieberman, EPS-R Payload Integration & Test lead.

Both payloads are undergoing integration onto their respective space vehicles and are scheduled for dual launch in late 2023. Once operational, they will provide 24/7 secure coverage to polar users for both strategic and tactical communications.

While the EPS-R satellites and ground system will be operated by the U.S. Space Force, the primary users of this capability are the U.S. Navy’s surface and subsurface fleets, and Coast Guard operating in the North Polar Region.  EPS-R will provide users with protected broadband communication into the 2030s.

SSC is the USSF field command responsible for rapidly identifying, prototyping and fielding resilient space capabilities for joint warfighters. SSC delivers sustainable joint space warfighting capabilities to defend the nation and its allies while disrupting adversaries in the contested space domain. SSC mission areas include launch acquisition and operations; space domain awareness; positioning, navigation and timing; missile warning; satellite communication; and cross-mission ground, command and control, and data.

Offline GWR64

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The FCC deadline Nov. 3 2023. Screenshot, Space Norway AS - Gr.pdf

SAT-MPL-20220311-00029

the technical narrative was updated in the meantime.
« Last Edit: 02/28/2023 06:48 pm by GWR64 »

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Request to FCC for extension:
Quote
Space Norway has paid all obligated costs to its satellite and ground station suppliers and has paid 95 percent of the total launch costs owed to SpaceX. Space Norway anticipates that the satellites will reach 100 percent completion by mid-November 2023.

Space Norway also believes that its request for a 12-month extension of its Milestone Deadline is justified. Specifically, Space Norway believes 12 months will not only ensure adequate time for completing the two satellites, performance of the launch services, and conducting in-orbit testing of the satellites, but also provide additional time to account for any unforeseen serious delay that may occur during the remaining testing. The ASBM System satellites are presently undergoing initial integrated system testing in preparation for thermal vacuum testing. Recent testing delays have further impacted the ASBM System’s schedule—based on current projections, Space Norway will not be able to launch the satellites until, at the earliest, November 2023, and a launch in early 2024 is more likely. The two satellites will be launched together on one Falcon 9 launch vehicle and SpaceX has confirmed assignment of the October 1, 2023 to January 31, 2024 launch period for deployment of the ASBM System satellites. Northrop Grumman estimates that from launch, it will take approximately 64 days to place the satellites in the correct orbits and achieve operational status.

Is it fair to assume the booster will be expended for this launch?

Edit:
This suggests the launch mass is actually 7,200kg: https://spacenorway.no/en/heosat/

More info on satellite bus here: https://www.northropgrumman.com/wp-content/uploads/DS-44a-GEOStar-3.pdf

With ASDS recovery, parking orbit could be something like 300km x 12,000km or 1,000km x 10,000km.
If expending, parking orbit could be closer to 1,000km x 25,000km.

Either way, based on the ~1,500kg propellant mass in both satellites, it's clear they have enough chemical prop to permit such orbit changes.
« Last Edit: 03/09/2023 10:13 am by EimajOzear »

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From USSF press release:
Quote
The ASBM mission is scheduled for  launch from Vandenberg Space Force Base, California aboard a SpaceX launch vehicle in 2024.

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« Last Edit: 05/12/2023 06:08 am by GewoonLukas_ »
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First of the two satellites has completed Thermal Vacuum Testing:

Quote
ARCTIC SET FOR HIGH-SPEED BROADBAND AS POLAR MISSION COMPLETES KEY MILESTONE

June 29, 2023

Viasat, Inc. (NASDAQ: VSAT), a global leader in satellite communications, and Space Norway, today announced that the first of the two satellites for the Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission, has successfully completed thermal vacuum testing, The new satellites, which will carry Viasat’s GX10A and B payloads, aim to connect users in the Far North with high-speed broadband in 2024.

[...]

https://www.inmarsat.com/en/news/latest-news/corporate/2023/arctic-set-for-high-speed-broadband.html
« Last Edit: 07/01/2023 10:58 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline AndrewM

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Northrop has delivered some more hardware for this flight.

Quote
Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC) has delivered two major components of the Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission (ASBM) and has started the next phase of pre-launch preparations. This two-satellite constellation will deliver protected satellite communications to the Northern polar region – one of the most difficult locations on earth to deliver communications.

The most recent accomplishments include:

Successful delivery of the Control and Planning Segment (CAPS) ground system to the U.S. Space Force
On-time delivery of both Enhanced Polar System Recapitalization (EPS-R) payloads to the Space Force
Integration of the EPS-R payload and successful completion of thermal-vacuum environmental testing on the first space vehicle.
ASBM-1 satellite enters thermal vacuum environmental testing at Northrop Grumman’s satellite manufacturing facility in Dulles, Virginia

https://www.bakersfield.com/ap/news/northrop-grumman-achieves-key-milestone-in-arctic-satellite-broadband-mission/article_3b6f1c3f-4dc0-5c87-862d-1631d1b9ee5a.html

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SAT-MPL-20230308-00049

Quote
By this Order, we grant Space Norway AS (Space Norway) a one-year extension of the
deadline for launch and commencement of operation of the first satellite in its two-satellite, nongeostationary satellite orbit (NGSO) system, from November 3, 2023, to November 3, 2024, based on continued COVID-19 related delays beyond Space Norway’s control.
...
Space Norway states that construction of both ASBM
satellites is expected to be completed by mid-November 2023, and that they will be launched together on
one Falcon 9 launch vehicle, with an assigned launch period of October 1, 2023, to January 31, 2024.

The last statement was provided to the FCC in March 2023 in the filing for the extension.

Offline PM3

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Spaceflight Now added this today for a launch in Q4 2023

https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/
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https://twitter.com/ngcnews/status/1721917241850024293

Quote
We’re one step closer to providing communications to the Arctic region with ASBM, as ASBM-1 undergoes vibration testing, with ASBM-2 to follow. Both satellites have completed thermal vacuum testing that simulates the harsh conditions they will encounter in orbit.

https://news.northropgrumman.com/news/releases/northrop-grumman-completes-essential-tests-for-arctic-region-satellite-communications-program

Quote
Northrop Grumman Completes Essential Tests for Arctic Region Satellite Communications Program

DULLES, Va. – Nov. 7, 2023 – (PHOTO RELEASE) Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC) has successfully completed Thermal Vacuum tests on the Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission (ASBM), a two-satellite constellation designed to deliver broadband communications to the Northern polar region for the U.S. Space Force and Space Norway. Each Northrop Grumman-built satellite carries a Ka-band payload for Viasat and X-Band payload for Norwegian Ministry of Defense, as well as the Enhanced Polar System Recapitalization payloads for the U.S. Space Force. ASBM-1 has completed vibration testing with ASBM-2 to follow.

Northrop Grumman is also providing the Control and Planning Segment (CAPS) ground system for this critical capability. CAPS is supporting compatibility testing with the payload and space vehicle segments and interfacing with the Satellite Operations Center (SOC) in Norway. CAPS has completed formal acceptance and turnover and is ready for system activation.

Online GewoonLukas_

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ViaSat continues to say launch is in 2024, which given that ASBM-2 has yet to complete vibration testing, is likely in my opinion:

Quote
Exciting times ahead as @ngcnews completes TVAC testing of two Space Norway spacecraft that will carry our GX10A and B communications payloads. 🚀🛰️

Another key milestone in our mission to connect users in the #Arctic with high-speed broadband #connectivity in 2024.

https://twitter.com/viasat/status/1721930076021788917
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Online gongora

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That tweet says service in 2024, launch could still be 2023.  (I agree time is getting very short to get them launched this year.)

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Space Force Space Systems Command press release pdf Space Systems Command Successfully Accepts Delivery of Enhanced Polar System--Recapitalization (EPS-R) Control and Planning Segment, May 11

seems to indicate launch is 2024:

Quote
The ASBM mission is scheduled for launch from Vandenberg Space Force Base, California aboard a SpaceX launch
vehicle in 2024.

unless it has been moved forward since May 11 2023?

Note May is after the March statement re:
...with an assigned launch period of October 1, 2023, to January 31, 2024.

The last statement was provided to the FCC in March 2023 in the filing for the extension.
« Last Edit: 11/08/2023 03:44 am by zubenelgenubi »

Offline AndrewM

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Looks like launch is in December.

Quote
Space Norway was set up about a decade ago to procure spacecraft for the Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission (ASBM), a $450 million two-satellite system in highly elliptical orbits to provide connectivity at latitudes beyond where geostationary satellites can reach.

Northrop Grumman of the United States is providing the satellites for a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch slated this year from Vandenberg Space Force Base, California.

https://spacenews.com/norway-buys-telenors-satellite-business-to-expand-space-ambitions/ [Nov 16]
« Last Edit: 12/08/2023 04:32 am by zubenelgenubi »

Online gongora

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Looks like launch is in December.

Quote
Space Norway was set up about a decade ago to procure spacecraft for the Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission (ASBM), a $450 million two-satellite system in highly elliptical orbits to provide connectivity at latitudes beyond where geostationary satellites can reach.

Northrop Grumman of the United States is providing the satellites for a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch slated this year from Vandenberg Space Force Base, California.

https://spacenews.com/norway-buys-telenors-satellite-business-to-expand-space-ambitions/

I'm not sure I'd take that article as proof.

Offline russianhalo117

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Looks like launch is in December.

Quote
Space Norway was set up about a decade ago to procure spacecraft for the Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission (ASBM), a $450 million two-satellite system in highly elliptical orbits to provide connectivity at latitudes beyond where geostationary satellites can reach.

Northrop Grumman of the United States is providing the satellites for a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch slated this year from Vandenberg Space Force Base, California.

https://spacenews.com/norway-buys-telenors-satellite-business-to-expand-space-ambitions/

I'm not sure I'd take that article as proof.
These are completely unrelated to each other. It is up to the Norwegian parliament to decide if the four Norwegian satellite families should be merged. The Norwegian parliament directed Space Norway to acquire all Norwegian owned space assets so this is a step in the process. Each satellite network will be acquired as separate subsidiaries initially.

https://spacenorway.no/en/space-norway-acquires-telenor-satellite/

Space Norway AS is currently compromised of the following satellite network subsidiaries so far:
Space Norway HEOSAT AS (HEOSAT):
https://spacenorway.no/en/heosat/

Space Norway Statsat AS (Statsat):
https://spacenorway.no/en/statsat/

Kongsberg Satellite Services AS (KSAT):
https://www.ksat.no/

Waiting to be integrated into Space Norway as a subsidiary:
Telenor Satellite AS (TSAT):
https://www.telenorsat.com/
« Last Edit: 11/19/2023 07:01 pm by russianhalo117 »

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Re: SpaceX F9: Space Norway ASBM : VSFB SLC-4E : Q4 2023
« Reply #40 on: 11/21/2023 12:44 pm »
Second satellite has completed Thermal Vacuum Testing. Launch is scheduled for mid-2024:

Quote
Viasat’s Broadband Arctic Extension Closer as Spacecraft Complete Key Tests
November 21, 2023

Viasat, Inc. (NASDAQ: VSAT), a global leader in satellite communications, has announced the second satellite in the upcoming Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission has completed thermal vacuum testing at Northrop Grumman’s Dulles, VA, site: a significant milestone as the project looks to connect the Arctic region with high speed broadband in the second half of 2024.

[...]

The ASBM-1 and ASBM-2 spacecraft will now undergo their final testing and readiness activities. Once complete, they will be transferred to Vandenberg Space Force Base, California and launched together on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket in mid-2024. The company will share further details on the launch schedule once confirmed.
« Last Edit: 11/21/2023 12:45 pm by GewoonLukas_ »
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Online GewoonLukas_

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Re: SpaceX F9: Space Norway ASBM : VSFB SLC-4E : mid 2024
« Reply #41 on: 02/06/2024 08:14 pm »
On track for launch in the middle of the year:

Quote
Viasat Shareholder Letter: Q3 Fiscal Year 2024 Financial Results
February 6th, 2024
[...]

Completed thermal vacuum testing on the second satellite in the upcoming Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission. The two ASBM satellites host Viasat's GX-10a and GX-10b Ka-band payloads, extending our high-speed global network across the Arctic region including polar coverage. Both satellites are expected to launch together in mid-calendar 2024

[...]
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