Author Topic: SpaceX F9 / Dragon 2 : CRS2 SpX-24 : KSC LC-39A : 21 December 2021 (10:06 UTC)  (Read 116530 times)

Offline Ken the Bin

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I received notices from the NGA.

Primary Day = Tuesday, December 21 at 10:06 UTC (05:06 EST).
Backup Day #1 = Wednesday, December 22 at ~09:43 UTC (~04:43 EST).
Backup Day #2 = Saturday, December 25 at ~08:33 UTC (~03:33 EST).
Backup Day #3 = Sunday, December 26 at ~08:10 UTC (~03:10 EST).
Backup Day #4 = Monday, December 27 at ~07:47 UTC (~02:47 EST).
Backup Day #5 = Tuesday, December 28 at ~07:22 UTC (~02:22 EST).
Backup Day #6 = Wednesday, December 29 at ~06:59 UTC (~01:59 EST).

Quote from: NGA
160943Z DEC 21
NAVAREA IV 1127/21(11,26).
WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC.
FLORIDA.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS, ROCKET LAUNCHING
   211001Z TO 211036Z DEC, ALTERNATE
   220938Z TO 221013Z, 250828Z TO 250903Z,
   260805Z TO 260840Z, 270742Z TO 270817Z,
   280717Z TO 280752Z AND 290654Z TO 290729Z DEC
   IN AREAS BOUND BY:
   A. 28-38-14N 080-37-09W, 28-54-00N 080-17-00W,
      28-51-00N 080-14-00W, 28-39-00N 080-24-00W,
      28-34-33N 080-34-20W, 28-38-02N 080-36-59W.
   B. 32-02-00N 076-43-00W, 32-33-00N 076-18-00W,
      32-51-00N 075-49-00W, 32-40-00N 075-37-00W,
      32-17-00N 075-55-00W, 31-53-00N 076-31-00W.
2. CANCEL THIS MSG 290829Z DEC 21.
Quote from: NGA
160812Z DEC 21
HYDROPAC 3644/21(75,76).
WESTERN SOUTH PACIFIC.
SOUTHEASTERN INDIAN OCEAN.
DNC 04, DNC 05.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS, SPACE DEBRIS
   211046Z TO 211120Z DEC, ALTERNATE
   221023Z TO 221057Z, 250913Z TO 250947Z,
   260850Z TO 260924Z, 270827Z TO 270901Z,
   280802Z TO 280836Z AND 290739Z TO 290813Z DEC
   IN AREA BOUND BY
   44-30S 115-04E, 43-39S 116-33E,
   43-54S 120-31E, 45-33S 128-39E,
   46-50S 134-38E, 48-44S 143-45E,
   50-39S 151-45E, 51-19S 154-29E,
   52-02S 156-17E, 53-31S 157-08E,
   54-41S 155-38E, 55-36S 150-09E,
   55-38S 142-42E, 54-50S 135-45E,
   53-29S 129-11E, 51-51S 124-18E,
   49-40S 119-39E, 46-37S 115-46E.
2. CANCEL THIS MSG 290913Z DEC 21.

Offline Rondaz

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SpaceX Drone Ship "Just Read The Instructions" (JRTI) departing Port Canaveral ahead of the Falcon 9 launch with CRS-24's Dragon from 39A.

A Shortfall Of Gravitas (ASOG) is already out at sea for the upcoming Turksat 5B mission out of SLC-40.

https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1471726466375327744

Offline Rondaz

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Today is the first day ever that SpaceX has had all three of its autonomous spaceport droneships deployed offshore for missions simultaneously.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1471951315798573062

Offline Rondaz

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ELaNa 38 CubeSats: Small Satellites Making a Big Impact

Jason Costa Posted on December 17, 2021

Launching aboard SpaceX’s 24th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station, NASA’s 38th Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) mission strengthens the initiative’s aim of providing opportunities for small satellite payloads built by universities, high schools, NASA Centers, and non-profit organizations. Liftoff from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida is scheduled for Tuesday, Dec. 21, at 5:06 a.m. EST.

The four small satellites, or CubeSats, that comprise the 38th ELaNa mission include designs from Aerospace Corporation in El Segundo, California; Utah State University in Logan, Utah; Georgia Tech Research Corporation in Atlanta, Georgia; and NASA’s Kennedy.

CubeSats are a class of research spacecraft called nanosatellites, built to standard dimensions – Units or “U” – of 4 inches cubed. Often included as secondary payloads, CubeSats can be 1U, 2U, 3U, or 6U in size, typically weighing less than 3 pounds per U and designed to carry out unique tasks once deployed into low-Earth orbit.

The Daily Atmospheric and Ionospheric Limb Imager (DAILI), built by Aerospace Corporation, is a linear 6U CubeSat that images the edge of Earth’s atmosphere to determine daytime density of atmospheric oxygen. The region of atmosphere it will study – roughly an altitude of 87 to 180 miles – is difficult to measure and produces uncertain atmospheric models. This investigation could help improve models informing our understanding of dynamics in the upper atmosphere, which can affect satellites and space debris in low-Earth orbit, while improved understanding of how Earth’s atmosphere works could contribute to better forecasting of weather and other atmospheric events.

The Aerospace Corporation – a national nonprofit corporation that operates a federally funded research and development center – designed and developed DAILI based on the company’s Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System experiment, which was operational on the space station from 2009 to 2010, enabled DAILI to be designed. The DAILI CubeSat project is led by principal investigator Dr. James Hecht.

An undergraduate team at Utah State University developed the Get Away Special Passive Attitude Control Satellite (GASPACS), a 1U CubeSat with a primary mission to deploy a meter-long inflatable boom in low-Earth orbit and transmit a clear photograph of the deployed boom to Earth. Inflatable structures are compact and lightweight and therefore could serve many useful purposes in space. On this mission, the inflatable boom also will passively stabilize the rotation of the satellite due to aerodynamic drag in orbit.

The GASPACS CubeSat was developed by the university’s Get Away Special Team – an undergraduate, extracurricular research team within the physics department that gives students the opportunity to learn real-world engineering skills by effectively contributing to aerospace research. The team’s principal investigator is Dr. Jan Sojka, head of the university’s physics department.

The Passive Thermal Coating Observatory Operating in Low-Earth Orbit (PATCOOL) satellite is a 3U CubeSat sponsored by NASA and developed by students at the University of Florida to investigate the feasibility of using a cryogenic selective surface coating as a more efficient way to passively cool components in space. The team hopes in-orbit testing will validate what ground tests have demonstrated – that this coating should provide a much higher reflectance of the Sun’s irradiant power than any existing coating while still providing far-infrared power emission.

The ADvanced Autonomous MUltiple Spacecraft (ADAMUS) Laboratory at the University of Florida (UF), with funding from NASA’s Launch Services Program (LSP), developed the PATCOOL CubeSat, along with principal investigator, Brandon Marsell, branch chief for LSP’s Environments and Launch Approval, based at Kennedy.

The Tethering and Ranging mission of the Georgia Institute of Technology (TARGIT) is a 3U CubeSat that seeks to develop and test in orbit an imaging LiDAR system capable of fine detailed topographic mapping while also providing university students with hands-on education in space systems and applications. Additionally, the mission will demonstrate a series of experimental spacecraft technologies, including active tether and inflation systems, 3D-printed components, horizon sensors using low-resolution thermal imagers, and nanocarbon-based solar cells.

Students from Georgia Tech’s School of Aerospace Engineering designed and developed the TARGIT CubeSat, under the tutelage of their professor and principal investigator, Dr. Brian C. Gunter.

The ELaNa 38 mission CubeSats were selected by NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) and assigned to the mission by LSP, based at Kennedy. CSLI provides launch opportunities for small satellite payloads built by universities, high schools, NASA Centers, and non-profit organizations.

To date, NASA has selected 220 CubeSat missions, 124 of which have been launched into space, with 37 more missions scheduled for launch within the next 12 months. The selected CubeSats represent participants from 42 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and 102 unique organizations.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/kennedy/2021/12/17/elana-38-cubesats-small-satellites-making-a-big-impact/

Offline Rondaz

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Launch Readiness Review Complete Ahead of 24th SpaceX Resupply Mission

Patti Bielling Posted on December 17, 2021

Joint teams from NASA and SpaceX have completed a launch readiness review ahead of the company’s 24th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station for the agency. Liftoff is targeted for Tuesday, Dec. 21, at 5:06 a.m. EST from Launch Complex 39A at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, and the live launch broadcast will begin at 4:45 a.m.

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft have been mated inside the company’s hangar at Launch Complex 39A. Rollout to the launch pad is scheduled for Sunday, Dec. 19, when teams from SpaceX will then raise the Falcon 9 – with Dragon atop – into vertical position in preparation for launch.

Tune in on NASA Television, the NASA app, or the agency’s website at noon Monday, Dec. 20, for the prelaunch news conference from Kennedy’s Press Site with the following participants:

Joel Montalbano, manager, NASA’s International Space Station Program
Bob Dempsey, acting deputy chief scientist, NASA’s International Space Station Program
Sarah Walker, director, Dragon Mission Management, SpaceX
Arlena Moses, launch weather officer, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s 45th Weather Squadron

SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft will deliver 6,500 pounds of new science investigations, supplies, and equipment for the international crew. Research includes a protein crystal growth study that could improve how cancer treatment drugs are delivered to patients and a handheld bioprinter that could one day be used to print tissue directly onto wounds for faster healing. Also aboard are experiments from students at several universities as part of the Student Payload Opportunity with Citizen Science (SPOCS) program as well as an investigation from the makers of Tide that examines detergent efficacy in microgravity.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacexcrs24/2021/12/17/launch-readiness-review-complete-ahead-of-24th-spacex-resupply-mission/

Offline Ken the Bin

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L-3 weather forecast.  40% 'Go' for December 21.  60% 'Go' for December 22.  Booster Recovery Weather Risk is Moderate for both days.  Additionally Upper-Level Wind Shear Risk is Moderate for Dec 22.

Offline Rondaz

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Weather 40% Favorable for Tuesday’s SpaceX Cargo Resupply Launch

Patti Bielling Posted on December 18, 2021

Weather officials with Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s 45th Weather Squadron predict a 40% chance of favorable weather conditions for Tuesday’s launch, with the cumulous cloud, thick cloud layer, and surface electric field rules being the primary weather concerns.

SpaceX is targeting Dec. 21, at 5:06 a.m. EST, to launch its 24th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station for NASA. Liftoff will be from Launch Complex 39A at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft will deliver new science investigations, supplies, and equipment for the international crew.

Some of the NASA science investigations launching as part of Dragon’s 6,500 pounds of cargo include a protein crystal growth study that could improve how cancer treatment drugs are delivered to patients and a handheld bioprinter that could one day be used to print tissue directly onto wounds for faster healing. There are also experiments from students at several universities as part of the Student Payload Opportunity with Citizen Science (SPOCS) program and an investigation from the makers of Tide that examines detergent efficacy in microgravity.

Live coverage will air on NASA Television, the NASA app and the agency’s website, with prelaunch events starting Tuesday at 4:45 a.m. You can also join us here on the blog for live updates.

Stay connected with the mission on social media and let people know you’re following the mission on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtags #Dragon and #NASASocial. Follow and tag these accounts:

Twitter: @NASA, @NASAKennedy, @NASASocial, @Space_Station, @ISS_Research, @ISS National Lab, @SpaceX

Facebook: NASA, NASAKennedy, ISS, ISS National Lab

Instagram: @NASA, @NASAKennedy, @ISS, @ISSNationalLab, @SpaceX

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacexcrs24/2021/12/18/weather-40-favorable-for-tuesdays-spacex-cargo-resupply-launch/

Offline Rondaz

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On Tuesday, Dec. 21, @SpaceX's Dragon spacecraft will lift off from Launch Complex 39A to deliver 6,500 pounds of cargo to the
@Space_Station.

Weather officials predict a 40% chance of favorable weather conditions for launch. Get the details:

https://twitter.com/NASAKennedy/status/1472234957066096640

Offline Rondaz

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A very special delivery for @NASAKennedy! Our BioSentinel experiment left the lab for the airport on its way to launch — hand carried by lead engineer Jeff Homan. Learn how it could help us improve future astronaut Astronaut safety:

https://twitter.com/NASAAmes/status/1471971805988470784

Offline zubenelgenubi

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LV transport to the pad, with Dragon attached, not until after the Turksat 5B launch tonight?



The Starlink cluster Falcon 9 launched from Vandenberg at December 18 12:41 UTC.

15 hours, 17 minutes later, the Turksat 5B Falcon 9 launched at Dec 19 03:58 UTC.

54 hours, 12 minutes after the second launch, the Dragon SpX-24 Falcon 9 will launch at Dec 21 10:06 UTC.

Also on December 21, at 14:33 UTC, a H-2A-204 will launch Intelsat 6A from Tanegashima, Japan.

Edits
« Last Edit: 12/19/2021 04:43 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Will there be a Static Fire before the SpX-24 launch?

We have no sure ID of the first stage.  If it is 1062.4, a relatively "young" booster, then it probably depends on what the customer, NASA, wants and pays for.

If it is 1052.3, SpaceX may perform one to ensure the modifications made to convert it to a "single stick" are good.  We'll see.

1069.1
No Static Fire
Hawthorne factory > McGregor Static Fire > Florida.

There was no launchpad Static Fire before 1067.1 launched Dragon SpX-22.
« Last Edit: 12/19/2021 06:37 am by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.) My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!" Yes, there are God-given rights. Do you wish to gainsay the Declaration of Independence?

Offline erv

https://twitter.com/tgmetsfan98/status/1472434977665130500?s=21

New 1st stage B1069 to be used for this flight.

Isn't it the first (and only) new booster this year?

Offline Elthiryel

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Isn't it the first (and only) new booster this year?

Nope, CRS-22 launched on 1067.1 in June, so it's the second one.
GO for launch, GO for age of reflight

Offline Ken the Bin

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L-2 weather forecast.  30% 'Go' for December 21.  60% 'Go' for December 22.  Booster Recovery Weather Risk is Moderate for both days.  Additionally Upper-Level Wind Shear Risk is Moderate for Dec 22.

Offline billh

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Isn't it the first (and only) new booster this year?

Nope, CRS-22 launched on 1067.1 in June, so it's the second one.
Over thirty flights and only two new boosters!  Wow!!

Offline Surfdaddy

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Isn't it the first (and only) new booster this year?

Nope, CRS-22 launched on 1067.1 in June, so it's the second one.
Over thirty flights and only two new boosters!  Wow!!

Also, 110 F9 flights, with 10 engines/flight, and one (or is it two?) engine failures in over 1100 ignitions.
Let's admire the incredible reliability of the Merlin engine.

Offline Rondaz

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SpaceX Falcon 9 Rolled to Launch Pad, Weather 30% Favorable for CRS-24 Launch

Patti Bielling Posted on December 19, 2021

NASA commercial cargo launch provider SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket – with the Dragon atop – was rolled out to the launch pad Sunday morning, Dec. 19, before being raised to a vertical position in preparation for Tuesday’s launch of SpaceX’s 24th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station. Liftoff of the Falcon 9 is scheduled for 5:06 a.m. EST.

Weather officials with Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s 45th Weather Squadron now predict a 30% chance of favorable weather conditions for Tuesday’s launch, with the cumulous cloud, thick cloud layer, and surface electric field rules remaining the primary weather concerns.

Dragon will deliver a variety of NASA science investigations, including a protein crystal growth study that could improve how cancer treatment drugs are delivered to patients, a handheld bioprinter that could one day be used to print tissue directly onto wounds for faster healing, an investigation from the makers of Tide that examines detergent efficacy in microgravity, and investigations from the Student Payload Opportunity with Citizen Science (SPOCS) program.

About 12 minutes after launch, Dragon will separate from the Falcon 9 rocket’s second stage and begin a carefully choreographed series of thruster firings to reach the space station. Arrival to the station is planned for Wednesday, Dec. 22. Dragon will dock autonomously to the forward-facing port of the station’s Harmony module, with NASA astronauts Raja Chari and Thomas Marshburn monitoring operations from the station.

The spacecraft is expected to spend about a month attached to the orbiting outpost before it returns to Earth with research and return cargo, splashing down off the coast of Florida.

Tune in to NASA TV or the agency’s website for live coverage of mission activities, beginning Monday, Dec. 20, at noon with the prelaunch news conference. Live launch day coverage starts Tuesday at 4:45 a.m. EST.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacexcrs24/2021/12/19/spacex-falcon-9-rolled-to-launch-pad-weather-30-favorable-for-crs-24-launch/

Offline Rondaz

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@SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket – with the Dragon spacecraft atop – was rolled out to the launch pad this morning in preparation for the 24th commercial resupply services mission.

Weather is now 30% favorable for liftoff on Tuesday, Dec. 21 at 5:06am ET:

https://twitter.com/NASAKennedy/status/1472645740900012040

Offline Conexion Espacial

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I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
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