Author Topic: SpaceX F9 / Dragon 2 : CRS2 SpX-24 : KSC LC-39A : 21 December 2021 (10:06 UTC)  (Read 116999 times)

Offline SPKirsch

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https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1485708643643183107
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Dragon’s trunk separation confirmed, and the spacecraft’s de-orbit burn is starting now
https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1485711960565972994
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De-orbit burn complete and Dragon’s nosecone is closing; splashdown off the coast of Florida at ~4:05 p.m. ET
https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1485719588952162308
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Drogue chutes deployed
https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1485719896067510274
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Dragon’s four main parachutes have deployed
« Last Edit: 01/24/2022 08:04 pm by SPKirsch »


Offline SPKirsch

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twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1485720504208019456
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Splashdown of Dragon confirmed, completing SpaceX’s 24th resupply mission to the @space_station!
https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1485720713830932481
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Once Dragon has been retrieved by SpaceX’s recovery team, the critical science aboard the spacecraft will be transported by helicopter to @NASAKennedy and provided to researchers
« Last Edit: 01/24/2022 08:09 pm by SPKirsch »

Offline Rondaz

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Cargo Dragon Splashes Down Ending SpaceX CRS-24 Mission

Mark Garcia Posted on January 24, 2022

SpaceX’s upgraded Dragon cargo spacecraft splashed down at 4:05 p.m. EST off the Florida coast, marking the return of the company’s 24th contracted cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station for NASA. The spacecraft carried more than 4,900 pounds of valuable scientific experiments and other cargo back to Earth.

Splashing down off the coast of Florida enables quick transportation of the experiments to NASA’s Space Station Processing Facility at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, allowing researchers to collect data with minimal sample exposure to Earth’s gravity.

Some of the scientific investigations that Dragon will return to Earth include:

Last light: A state-of-the-art light imaging microscope, the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) will return after about 12 years on the station. LMM, sponsored by NASA’s Division of Biological and Physical Sciences, made it possible to observe and record the way matter is organized and moves on the microscopic level, and supported ground-breaking colloid research, plant studies, and thermophysics experiments.

Tiny structures, assemble: The InSPACE-4 physics study is returning samples that could provide insight into how to harness nanoparticles to fabricate and manufacture new materials, including medical diagnostics and thermal shields for Earth and space applications.

Cell signaling in microgravity: The ESA (European Space Agency) investigation Cytoskeleton contributes to understanding of how the human body responds to microgravity. The study could support development of countermeasures to help astronaut crew members maintain optimum health on future space missions.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2022/01/24/cargo-dragon-splashes-down-ending-spacex-crs-24-mission/

Offline Rondaz

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.@SpaceX's #CargoDragon spacecraft splashed down at 4:05pm ET off the Florida coast after transporting 4,900 lbs. of scientific experiments and other cargo back to Earth.

https://twitter.com/Space_Station/status/1485726387642191881

Offline Rondaz

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The helicopter carrying critical science from Dragon has taken off from recovery ship GO Searcher and is heading for Kennedy Space Center.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1485751240709525511

Offline SPKirsch

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https://twitter.com/Patrick_Colqu/status/1485725145402650628
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With @SpaceX CRS-24 mission complete, you can see the dishes at Boca Chica track the cargo dragon as it reenters minutes before splashing down in the Atlantic ocean.

learn more about CRS-24 : https://nasaspaceflight.com/2022/01/crs-24-return/

Watch live with @NASASpaceflight : http://nasaspaceflight.com/starbaselive

Offline Conexion Espacial

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Offline Conexion Espacial

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Some of the Cubesats sent to the ISS on the CRS-24 mission were deployed today from the Nanoracks CubeSat Deployer on the International Space Station.
(each cubesat has the link to the publication of its respective deployment)



FEES2/GASPACS
PATCOOL
DAILI
TARGIT
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Offline Conexion Espacial

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Another view of C209 before and after undocking from the ISS.
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
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Offline Rondaz

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Offline Rondaz

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GO Searcher with the CRS-24 Dragon has been hanging out offshore all night instead of coming in to dock. Entry to port time is unknown and I imagine that Dragon will be offloaded rather quickly.

https://twitter.com/julia_bergeron/status/1487404723573510145

Offline Conexion Espacial

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Offline Conexion Espacial

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We can finally see C209 after its return from space, as neither NASA nor SpaceX published photos.https://twitter.com/kyle_m_photo/status/1487500829015912449
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Offline Vettedrmr

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Aviation/space enthusiast, retired control system SW engineer, doesn't know anything!

Offline Rondaz

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#ICYMI here's a slightly tweaked shot so you can see better the plumes from #SpaceX Cargo Dragon's Draco engines as they fired after undocking from the @Space_Station last week..

https://twitter.com/esa/status/1488916595737079813

Offline Targeteer

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https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/new-space-based-weather-instruments-start-gathering-data?fbclid=IwAR1mJ3jS7Auuvt7lVFmJchweBPKuJiqXX7ZPbOYyiAgPRBTxUPedZVmXSgg

New Space-Based Weather Instruments Start Gathering Data
Feb. 8, 2022

This map, made using COWVR’s new observations, shows Earth’s microwave emissions at a frequency that provides information on the strength of winds at the ocean surface, the amount of water in clouds, and the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Innovative mini instruments on the International Space Station have produced their first maps of global humidity and ocean winds.

After being installed on the International Space Station, two small instruments designed and built at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California were powered up Jan. 7 and began collecting data on Earth’s ocean winds and atmospheric water vapor – critical information required for weather and marine forecasts. Within two days, the Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer (COWVR) and Temporal Experiment for Storms and Tropical Systems (TEMPEST) instruments had gathered enough data to begin producing maps.

COWVR and TEMPEST launched on Dec. 21, 2021, with SpaceX’s 24th commercial resupply mission for NASA. Both instruments are microwave radiometers, measuring variations in natural microwave emissions from Earth. Part of the U.S. Space Force’s Space Test Program-Houston 8 (STP-H8), the instruments were designed to demonstrate that they can collect data comparable in quality to the larger instruments currently operating in orbit.

This new map from COWVR shows microwave emissions from Earth at 34 gigahertz through all latitudes visible to the space station (52 degrees north to 52 degrees south). This particular microwave frequency provides weather forecasters information on the strength of winds at the ocean surface, the amount of water in clouds, and the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere.

Green and white on the map indicate higher water vapor and clouds, while dark blue over the ocean indicates drier air and clear sky. The image captures typical weather patterns, such as tropical moisture and rain (the green band stretching across center of map) and mid-latitude storms moving across the ocean.

"We’re off to a great start,” said Shannon Brown, the JPL technologist who designed the COWVR instrument. “Seeing this quality of data so early into the mission sets the stage for very exciting things to come.”

COWVR is a complete rethinking of a classic instrument design, while TEMPEST is the product of a long advance toward miniaturizing instrument components. If they continue to prove successful, they will crack open the door to a new era where lower-cost satellites complement the existing weather satellite fleet.

How the Instruments Work

Radiometers need an antenna that rotates so that they can observe a wide swath of Earth’s surface instead of just a narrow line. In all other spaceborne microwave radiometers, not only the antenna but also the radiometer itself and the companion electronics rotate about 30 times a minute. There are good scientific and engineering reasons for a design with so many spinning parts, but it’s a challenge to keep a spacecraft stable when there’s that much moving mass. Also, the mechanism that passes power and data between the spinning and the stationary sides of the instrument has proved to be time-consuming and difficult to build.

Weighing about 130 pounds (57.8 kilograms), COWVR has less than one-fifth the mass of the microwave radiometer used by the U.S. military to measure ocean winds. Less than one-third of its mass rotates. To avoid the need for a separate mechanism that transfers power and data from the spinning to the stable parts, Brown mounted everything that has to spin on a turntable.

He and his team enabled other design innovations by increasing the complexity of the data processing required – in other words, finding software solutions to hardware challenges. For example, the team replaced a part of the instrument called a “warm target,” used to calibrate the radiometer’s polarization measurements, with a noise source that generates known polarized signals. When the calibration is complete, these known signals can be removed like any other noise in a data transmission.

COWVR’s companion instrument, TEMPEST, is the product of decades of NASA investment in technology to make space-bound electronics more compact. In the mid-2010s, JPL engineer Sharmila Padmanabhan pondered what scientific goals could be accomplished by packaging a compact sensor in a CubeSat – a type of very small satellite often used for testing new design concepts inexpensively. “We said, ‘Hey, if we can actually manage to compactly package a sensor inside a CubeSat, we can get measurements of clouds, convection, and precipitation over time,’” Padmanabhan remembered. Those measurements would provide more insight into how storms grow.

Padmanabhan’s design was first tried out in space from 2018 to last June. That CubeSat, known as TEMPEST-D (“D” for “demonstration”), measured water vapor in the atmosphere and captured images of many major hurricanes and storms. The newly deployed TEMPEST is about the size of a large cereal box and weighs less than 3 pounds (1.3 kilograms), with an antenna about 6 inches (15 centimeters) in diameter.

The antenna size dictates that TEMPEST can best observe only the shortest microwave wavelengths sensitive to water vapor – about 10 times shorter than the ones COWVR senses. A smaller antenna “matches” short wavelengths better, similar to the way the short air column of a flute is suitable for short wavelengths of sound (high notes), while the long air column of a tuba is better for the long wavelengths of low notes.

COWVR and TEMPEST’s combined data provides most of the same measurements available from large microwave radiometers used for weather observations. The instruments were funded by the U.S. Space Force and Navy, but users from other agencies, universities, and branches of the military are also interested. These scientists are already working on mission concepts that would take advantage of the new low-cost microwave sensor technologies to study long-standing questions such as how heat from the ocean fuels global weather patterns.
« Last Edit: 02/08/2022 10:54 pm by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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