Author Topic: FAILURE : Astra R3.3 - LV0010 - TROPICS Flight 1 - CCSFS SLC-46 - 12 June 2022  (Read 22401 times)

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716
This topic is for updates and discussion of this mission.

Astra Rocket 3.3 - LV0010 - TROPICS Flight 1
Launch Date and time: June 12, 2022, 17:43 UTC (1:43 pm EDT)
Payloads: Two TROPICS satellites

Quote
A constellation of identical 3U CubeSats provide sounding (left CubeSat has a temperature profile of a simulated Tropical Cyclone (TC) from a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model) and 12-channel radiometric imagery (center CubeSat has simulated radiances from NWP model and radiative transfer model and the near right CubeSat has a single-channel radiance image of a TC) with a median revisit rate approaching 60 minutes to meet state-of-the-art performance.

The Time-Resolved Observations of Precipitation structure and storm Intensity with a Constellation of Smallsats (TROPICS) mission will provide rapid-refresh microwave measurements over the tropics that can be used to observe the thermodynamics of the troposphere and precipitation structure for storm systems at the mesoscale and synoptic scale over the entire storm lifecycle. TROPICS comprises a constellation of CubeSats in three low-Earth orbital planes. Each CubeSat will host a high-performance radiometer scanning across the satellite track at 30 RPM to provide temperature profiles using seven channels near the 118.75 GHz oxygen absorption line, water vapor profiles using 3 channels near the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line, imagery in a single channel near 90 GHz for precipitation measurements, and a single channel at 205 GHz for cloud ice measurements.
More Information: https://tropics.ll.mit.edu/CMS/tropics/Mission-Overview
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 06:00 pm by zubenelgenubi »
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716

LV0010 has arrived at SLC-46 and is being prepared for launch tentatively scheduled for June.https://twitter.com/Astra/status/1531354329554137088
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716

NASA says first launch in July
Quote

Date: By July 2022
Mission: TROPICS First Launch
https://www.nasa.gov/launchschedule/
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Offline josephus

  • Member
  • Posts: 13
  • Let me play among the stars
  • Liked: 9
  • Likes Given: 11

NASA says first launch in July
Quote

Date: By July 2022
Mission: TROPICS First Launch
https://www.nasa.gov/launchschedule/

It says "by July", not "in July". Why would Astra wait to launch more than a month after conducting its static fire test?
Let me see what nuclear spring is like on Jupiter and Mars

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 27751
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 51584
  • Likes Given: 22128
https://twitter.com/astra/status/1533924019317051392

Quote
Successful static fire for @NASA TROPICS-1! #AdAstra

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716

It appears that Astra is targeting the 12th of this month for the launch.https://twitter.com/w_robinsonsmith/status/1533936491944099845
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Offline zubenelgenubi

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8122
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Sometimes it feels like Trantor in the time of Hari Seldon
  • Liked: 4789
  • Likes Given: 41387
It appears that Astra is targeting the 12th of this month for the launch.
Per the tweet, I checked the post's website and found no LHAs posted.
https://www.patrick.spaceforce.mil

June 12th seems a plausible launch date?
« Last Edit: 06/07/2022 11:17 am by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.)
My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!"

Offline zubenelgenubi

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8122
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Sometimes it feels like Trantor in the time of Hari Seldon
  • Liked: 4789
  • Likes Given: 41387
NextSpaceFlight TROPICS Flight 1 launch NET June 12, 2022
« Last Edit: 06/07/2022 08:34 pm by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.)
My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!"

Online harrystranger

Forgot to share this one earlier  ::)
Rocket 3 on the pad after static fire  :)
https://twitter.com/Harry__Stranger/status/1534154498088013826?s
It can be really hard to interpret satellite imagery! Local knowledge & an understanding of an area’s history are crucial pieces of the puzzle.
- Rob Simmon

Offline Ken the Bin

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1558
  • US Pacific Time Zone
  • Liked: 2440
  • Likes Given: 2450
NGA notice.

Quote from: NGA
010004Z JUN 22
NAVAREA IV 543/22(GEN).
WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC.
FLORIDA.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS, ROCKET LAUNCHING
   121600Z TO 121845Z JUN, ALTERNATE
   1600Z TO 1845Z DAILY 13 JUN THRU 18 JUN
   IN AREAS BOUND BY:
   A. 28-29.44N 080-32.53W, 28-37.00N 080-07.00W,
      28-50.00N 078-52.00W, 29-30.00N 075-17.00W,
      29-52.00N 071-26.00W, 30-11.00N 066-13.00W,
      30-18.00N 056-04.00W, 29-10.00N 047-01.00W,
      28-52.00N 047-01.00W, 28-51.00N 047-02.00W,
      29-53.00N 056-05.00W, 29-29.00N 071-05.00W,
      29-00.00N 075-35.00W, 28-23.00N 080-23.00W,
      28-25.82N 080-34.27W.
   B. 30-26.00N 067-06.00W, 31-14.00N 063-34.00W,
      31-34.00N 056-44.00W, 30-56.00N 050-59.00W,
      29-57.00N 046-22.00W, 28-51.00N 046-29.00W,
      28-31.00N 050-15.00W, 28-32.00N 055-55.00W,
      28-59.00N 061-51.00W, 29-28.00N 067-00.00W.
2. CANCEL THIS MSG 181945Z JUN 22.//

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Offline josephus

  • Member
  • Posts: 13
  • Let me play among the stars
  • Liked: 9
  • Likes Given: 11
Chris Kemp said on Bloomberg right now that they expect to get a license this Friday 06/10. If they will get it, they will launch on Sunday 06/12.
Let me see what nuclear spring is like on Jupiter and Mars

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716
NextSpaceFlight indicates that the launch window is from 16:00 UTC to 18:45 UTC, pointing to the beginning of the launch window.
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716

Astra has already published information about the mission, including some images like these.https://astra.com/missions/tropics-1/
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Online Galactic Penguin SST

NextSpaceFlight indicates that the launch window is from 16:00 UTC to 18:45 UTC, pointing to the beginning of the launch window.

Based on:
NGA notice.

Quote from: NGA
010004Z JUN 22
NAVAREA IV 543/22(GEN).
WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC.
FLORIDA.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS, ROCKET LAUNCHING
   121600Z TO 121845Z JUN, ALTERNATE
   1600Z TO 1845Z DAILY 13 JUN THRU 18 JUN
   IN AREAS BOUND BY:
   A. 28-29.44N 080-32.53W, 28-37.00N 080-07.00W,
      28-50.00N 078-52.00W, 29-30.00N 075-17.00W,
      29-52.00N 071-26.00W, 30-11.00N 066-13.00W,
      30-18.00N 056-04.00W, 29-10.00N 047-01.00W,
      28-52.00N 047-01.00W, 28-51.00N 047-02.00W,
      29-53.00N 056-05.00W, 29-29.00N 071-05.00W,
      29-00.00N 075-35.00W, 28-23.00N 080-23.00W,
      28-25.82N 080-34.27W.
   B. 30-26.00N 067-06.00W, 31-14.00N 063-34.00W,
      31-34.00N 056-44.00W, 30-56.00N 050-59.00W,
      29-57.00N 046-22.00W, 28-51.00N 046-29.00W,
      28-31.00N 050-15.00W, 28-32.00N 055-55.00W,
      28-59.00N 061-51.00W, 29-28.00N 067-00.00W.
2. CANCEL THIS MSG 181945Z JUN 22.//
Astronomy & spaceflight geek penguin. In a relationship w/ Space Shuttle Discovery. Current Priority: Chasing the Chinese Spaceflight Wonder Egg & A Certain Chinese Mars Rover

Online Rondaz

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 24682
  • Liked: 4696
  • Likes Given: 164
Astra Sets Launch Date for TROPICS

Linda Herridge Posted on June 8, 2022

Astra Space Inc. is targeting no earlier than June 12, pending issuance of a launch license from the Federal Aviation Administration, for the first launch of NASA’s Time-Resolved Observations of Precipitation structure and storm Intensity with a Constellation of Smallsats (TROPICS), a constellation of six CubeSats. Two CubeSats, each about the size of a loaf of bread, will launch aboard Astra’s Rocket 3.3 from Space Launch Complex 46 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.

TROPICS will study tropical cyclones like hurricanes, some of the most powerful and destructive weather events on Earth, by measuring storm characteristics with a sensor about the size of a coffee cup. The miniaturized microwave radiometer detects the thermal radiation naturally emitted by the oxygen and water vapor in the air. TROPICS has the potential to provide near-hourly observations of a storm’s precipitation, temperature, and humidity. This data can help scientists increase understanding of the processes driving rapid changes in storm structure and intensity, which will improve weather forecasting models.

Astra will launch the other four TROPICS CubeSats in two separate launches later this summer.

The TROPICS team is led by Principal Investigator Dr. William Blackwell at Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT) Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington and includes researchers from NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and several universities and commercial partners. NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, will manage the launch service.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/kennedy/2022/06/08/astra-sets-launch-date-for-tropics/

Offline josephus

  • Member
  • Posts: 13
  • Let me play among the stars
  • Liked: 9
  • Likes Given: 11
From the current operations plan advisory:
Quote
ATCSCC ADVZY 033 DCC 06/10/2022 OPERATIONS PLAN

SPACE LAUNCH/RECOVERY OPERATIONS:
ASTRA TROPICS-1 CSS, FL
PRIMARY: 06/12/22   1600Z-1836Z
BACKUP: 06/13-18/22   1600Z-1836Z

https://www.fly.faa.gov/adv/adv_spt.jsp
Let me see what nuclear spring is like on Jupiter and Mars

Offline Ken the Bin

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1558
  • US Pacific Time Zone
  • Liked: 2440
  • Likes Given: 2450
L-2 weather forecast.  50% -> 20% 'Go' for June 12.  70% -> 50% 'Go' for June 13.  All Additional Risk Criteria are Low.

Note: There was no L-3 weather forecast posted publicly yesterday.

Offline josephus

  • Member
  • Posts: 13
  • Let me play among the stars
  • Liked: 9
  • Likes Given: 11
« Last Edit: 06/10/2022 06:18 pm by josephus »
Let me see what nuclear spring is like on Jupiter and Mars

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716
A short video with shots of Rocket 3.3 and information from TROPICS before the FAA licensing this afternoon.
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716
NASASpaceFlight Livestream
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716
The launch window will be two hours starting at 16:00 UTC (12:00 EDT).
https://astra.com/missions/tropics-1/
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Offline Ken the Bin

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1558
  • US Pacific Time Zone
  • Liked: 2440
  • Likes Given: 2450
L-1 weather forecast.  50% -> 20% 'Go' for June 12.  70% -> 50% 'Go' for June 13.  All Additional Risk Criteria are Low.

Online Conexion Espacial

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1722
  • Liked: 2307
  • Likes Given: 1716
New astra images of the static fire
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Online kdhilliard

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 987
  • Kirk
  • Tanstaa, FL
  • Liked: 1384
  • Likes Given: 3405
A short video with shots of Rocket 3.3 and information from TROPICS before the FAA licensing this afternoon.

What's so secret about the Pac-Man silhouette that it needed to be blurred?
Image from 0:40 in that video.

Offline Bean Kenobi

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 407
  • Liked: 229
  • Likes Given: 143
A short video with shots of Rocket 3.3 and information from TROPICS before the FAA licensing this afternoon.

What's so secret about the Pac-Man silhouette that it needed to be blurred?
Image from 0:40 in that video.

It's a hole in the rocket, look at the photo just above.

Online kdhilliard

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 987
  • Kirk
  • Tanstaa, FL
  • Liked: 1384
  • Likes Given: 3405
...
It's a hole in the rocket, look at the photo just above.

Right.  An access hole in the upper fairing, shown with cover in place in this high-res Brady Kenniston photo from Astra's mission page.

But why blurred?  That high, I'd have thought all it would show would be the payload.
(Also interesting in Kenniston's photo is the "Remove Before Flight" tag emerging from the cover of a lower fairing access cover.)

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 35998
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 18440
  • Likes Given: 397

But why blurred?  That high, I'd have thought all it would show would be the payload.
(Also interesting in Kenniston's photo is the "Remove Before Flight" tag emerging from the cover of a lower fairing access cover.)

it would show parts of the upper stage

Offline Celeste_El

  • Member
  • Posts: 25
  • MA
  • Liked: 47
  • Likes Given: 1
...
It's a hole in the rocket, look at the photo just above.

Right.  An access hole in the upper fairing, shown with cover in place in this high-res Brady Kenniston photo from Astra's mission page.

But why blurred?  That high, I'd have thought all it would show would be the payload.
(Also interesting in Kenniston's photo is the "Remove Before Flight" tag emerging from the cover of a lower fairing access cover.)

Yeah, it would be almost right in the middle of the second stage. I don't think people have grasp of just how far the second stage sticks into the fairing. There's not a ton of usable space for payloads however, given the low payload to orbit, I don't think its a big deal.

Photo is from an old factory tour video. The video is public, IE I'm not leaking anything  :P

Offline Celeste_El

  • Member
  • Posts: 25
  • MA
  • Liked: 47
  • Likes Given: 1
Also, I feel like there should be an overarching thread for all 3 of the tropics launches instead of individual ones for each launch given they're all for the same mission and should, hopefully, have a short turn around between the three of them.
« Last Edit: 06/11/2022 09:08 pm by Celeste_El »

Online Rondaz

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 24682
  • Liked: 4696
  • Likes Given: 164
Orbital Launch no.64 of 2022

TROPICS-1 | Astra | June 12 | 1200 ET

@Astra (NASDAQ: $ASTR) will launch the @NASA #TROPICS1 mission carrying two earth observation 3U cubesats from @MIT onboard its Rocket 3🚀#LV0010 from SLC-46 @SLDelta45, FL.

https://twitter.com/SpaceIntellige3/status/1535199872902737920
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 12:08 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline Ken the Bin

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1558
  • US Pacific Time Zone
  • Liked: 2440
  • Likes Given: 2450
L-0 weather forecast.  40% -> 10% 'Go' for June 12.  70% -> 50% 'Go' for June 13.  All Additional Risk Criteria are Low.

Online kdhilliard

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 987
  • Kirk
  • Tanstaa, FL
  • Liked: 1384
  • Likes Given: 3405
Astra/NASASpaceFlight webcast is now live:
https://youtube.com/watch?v=HztFm2XGO7s

Edit: Looks like they are targeting the 12:00 opening of their window.
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 03:39 pm by kdhilliard »

Offline Chris Bergin

Support NSF via L2 -- Help improve NSF -- Site Rules/Feedback/Updates
**Not a L2 member? Whitelist this forum in your adblocker to support the site and ensure full functionality.**

Online edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14715
  • Liked: 7176
  • Likes Given: 1147
Holding at T-15 min due to boats in the safety area.

 - Ed Kyle

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 27751
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 51584
  • Likes Given: 22128
https://twitter.com/nasaspaceflight/status/1536014522930155520

Quote
Holding at T-15 due to @WaywardBoat in the Range!

youtube.com/watch?v=HztFm2…
#AstraPartner

Online edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14715
  • Liked: 7176
  • Likes Given: 1147
Now counting down toward a 16:12 UTC launch.
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 05:49 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Online edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14715
  • Liked: 7176
  • Likes Given: 1147
Ascent Timeline.
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 05:49 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Online edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14715
  • Liked: 7176
  • Likes Given: 1147
.
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 05:50 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Online edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14715
  • Liked: 7176
  • Likes Given: 1147
HOLD at about T-1:30.

« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 05:51 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Online edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14715
  • Liked: 7176
  • Likes Given: 1147
Cruise ship coming in to Port, but this isn't the cause of the current HOLD.  More time was needed for "LOX Conditioning".  Count to restart soon.
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 05:51 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Online edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14715
  • Liked: 7176
  • Likes Given: 1147
Sounds like the weather may go bad around 16:50 UTC, so crews in a race to beat the weather.  The actual launch window extends to 18:00 UTC.
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 05:52 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Back to GO with T-0 at 17:43 UTC.

[zubenelgenubi: added screen captures]
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 06:23 pm by zubenelgenubi »
Astronomy & spaceflight geek penguin. In a relationship w/ Space Shuttle Discovery. Current Priority: Chasing the Chinese Spaceflight Wonder Egg & A Certain Chinese Mars Rover

Offline russianhalo117

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7956
  • Liked: 3780
  • Likes Given: 747
Liftoff occurred with nominal MECO and SES. Standing by for SECO and payload deployment.

[zubenelgenubi: added screen captures]
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 06:27 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline ugordan

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8336
    • My mainly Cassini image gallery
  • Liked: 3152
  • Likes Given: 695
Premature shutdown.

[zubenelgenubi: added screen captures]
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 06:34 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline russianhalo117

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7956
  • Liked: 3780
  • Likes Given: 747
Early SECO just over a minute before scheduled SECO at a maximum broadcast velocity of 6575m/s. Orbital velocity was not achieved.
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 05:55 pm by russianhalo117 »

Online DaveS

  • Shuttle program observer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8447
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 1081
  • Likes Given: 62
Premature shutdown.
With subsequent tumble at T+7:25.

[zubenelgenubi: added screen captures]
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 06:47 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Offline ugordan

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8336
    • My mainly Cassini image gallery
  • Liked: 3152
  • Likes Given: 695
Around 1000 m/s short of orbital velocity.

Online DaveS

  • Shuttle program observer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8447
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 1081
  • Likes Given: 62
Tracking map, yellow vertical line is 1st stage MECO point with the green vertical line being the planned SECO and orbital insertion point:
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Online ZachS09

  • Space Savant
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7907
  • Roanoke, TX
  • Liked: 1908
  • Likes Given: 1790
That's five failures and two successes over the course of Rocket 3's flight history.
Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 27751
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 51584
  • Likes Given: 22128
https://twitter.com/kemp/status/1536050802736803847

Quote
We regret not being able to deliver the first two TROPICS satellites. Nothing is more important to our team than the trust of our customers and the successful delivery of the remaining TROPICS satellites. We will share more when we have fully reviewed data.

Offline Thorny

  • Regular
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 860
  • San Angelo, Texas
  • Liked: 263
  • Likes Given: 417
Tracking map, yellow vertical line is 1st stage MECO point with the green vertical line being the planned SECO and orbital insertion point:

MECO was back much closer to Florida. I think the yellow line was the planned Stage 2 cutoff and the green line was planned payload deploy.

Online kdhilliard

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 987
  • Kirk
  • Tanstaa, FL
  • Liked: 1384
  • Likes Given: 3405
Tracking map, yellow vertical line is 1st stage MECO point with the green vertical line being the planned SECO and orbital insertion point:
MECO was back much closer to Florida. I think the yellow line was the planned Stage 2 cutoff and the green line was planned payload deploy.

Agreed.  Here's the first view we have of that plot after MECO, at T+04:55, 1m40 into upper stage flight.

DaveS's plot capture first appeared at T+09:06, and didn't seem to change over the next three minutes (until 12:08, when they cut away for goodbyes), so I suspect they lost telemetry shortly after SECO.
[Telemetry continues to be displayed for a full minute after shutdown, until it is removed from the screen.]

Early shutdown aside, I assume we shouldn't make much of their trajectory being in corridor, but noticeably south of midline?

Also, steering looked a bit sporty to me, both during the few seconds of booster rocket cam video, and again later during S2 flight.  Not overly jerky, but not as smooth as I expected, as if the control loop wasn't properly dampened or as if the thrust vectoring couldn't be controlled finely enough.  Is this typical of earlier Rocket 3 flights?

Edited to note that the displayed telemetry continued for a full minute after shutdown.
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 09:50 pm by kdhilliard »

Online Robert_the_Doll

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 245
  • Florida
  • Liked: 247
  • Likes Given: 95
Very unfortunate indeed. Even if the stage had not tumbled, and the payloads able to separate, there was no way for them to make up that 1000 m/sec deficit.

Online DaveS

  • Shuttle program observer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8447
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 1081
  • Likes Given: 62
Tracking map, yellow vertical line is 1st stage MECO point with the green vertical line being the planned SECO and orbital insertion point:

MECO was back much closer to Florida. I think the yellow line was the planned Stage 2 cutoff and the green line was planned payload deploy.
That doesn't make any sense unless the vehicle was seriously underperforming and flew long as the tracking line was well beyond the yellow line before the early SECO.

Underperfomance would however explain it nicely as the second stage ran out of propellant and the engine shutdown and an underperformance would show up in tracking data as the vehicle would fly long.

Saw the same thing on the first Delta IV Heavy launch where the strap-on CBCs and the Center CBC were shut down and jettisoned early leading to the upper stage to burn longer than expected to compensate for the velocity shortfall at upper stage ignition for the first burn.
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Offline zubenelgenubi

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8122
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Sometimes it feels like Trantor in the time of Hari Seldon
  • Liked: 4789
  • Likes Given: 41387
Thanks NSF and Astra for today’s webcast!

Thanks to Ed and everyone else who assisted with today’s launch thread coverage!
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.)
My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!"

Offline Jeff Lerner

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 577
  • Toronto, Canada
  • Liked: 231
  • Likes Given: 179
Also, that last screenshot shows an altitude of 359km…wasn’t the planned altitude 350km ?
Perhaps the first stage guidance was lofting the rocket and the 2nd stage ran out of fuel trying to obtain orbital velocity?
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 06:57 pm by Jeff Lerner »

Online kdhilliard

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 987
  • Kirk
  • Tanstaa, FL
  • Liked: 1384
  • Likes Given: 3405
A few more screen captures:
T+07:14 -- Flight Director Chris Hofmann abruptly removes his mask, presumably in frustration at the premature shutdown.
T+07:21 -- Shutdown visible on our feed.
T+07:22 -- Tumbling.

Link to T+07:10.

Our view of the Velocity/Altitude telemetry seems to be synchronized to that of the downlinked video, as velocity peaked at the same time we saw shutdown: 6575 m/s at 531 km.

Offline Celeste_El

  • Member
  • Posts: 25
  • MA
  • Liked: 47
  • Likes Given: 1
Also, that last screenshot shows an altitude of 359km…wasn’t the planned altitude 350km ?
Perhaps the first stage guidance was lofting the rocket and the 2nd stage ran out of fuel trying to obtain orbital velocity?


Planned was 550 Km. They probably over shoot and null out vertical velocity as they approach target apogee. I think Manley's take on the matter is the very plausible. Rocket noses down to kill vertical velocity. This causes enough slosh to cause the engine to shut off. Possibly the nose down was too violent, would be inline with the poorly tuned control seen with the wiggling on ascent. Then, without engine power, the nose down becomes a tumble.

Either way, Astra is good at trouble shooting and getting back to the pad. Last failure was met with a successful launch within a month.

https://twitter.com/DJSnM/status/1536048958429990914
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 07:11 pm by Celeste_El »

Online DaveS

  • Shuttle program observer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8447
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 1081
  • Likes Given: 62
Will interesting to know if any Low Level Cut-Off (LLCO) sensors were tripped. They're there for this very reason, to shut down the engine(s) before a complete loss of propellant occurs.

LLCO sensors on the shuttle was known by the faulty term of "Engine Cut-Off" (ECO) sensors and malfunctioning sensors caused by a badly designed external feedthrough connector on the External Tank side of things were the causes of launch scrubs of STS-114 (July 13 2005), STS-115 (September 8 2006) and STS-122 (December 7 and December 9 2007).
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 07:20 pm by DaveS »
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Online kdhilliard

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 987
  • Kirk
  • Tanstaa, FL
  • Liked: 1384
  • Likes Given: 3405
Tracking map, yellow vertical line is 1st stage MECO point with the green vertical line being the planned SECO and orbital insertion point:
MECO was back much closer to Florida. I think the yellow line was the planned Stage 2 cutoff and the green line was planned payload deploy.
That doesn't make any sense unless the vehicle was seriously underperforming and flew long as the tracking line was well beyond the yellow line before the early SECO.
...

No.  That tracking line wasn't shown past the yellow line until, T+09:06, nearly two minutes after the early shutdown.

(Complicating things, that tracking line didn't appear to be updated regularly, as seen by its significant jump at T+05:47.  Link to T+05:45.)

Also, the timing of the shutdown, 75 seconds or so before the planned SECO of T+08:30, doesn't suggest a longer flying underperformance.

Online kdhilliard

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 987
  • Kirk
  • Tanstaa, FL
  • Liked: 1384
  • Likes Given: 3405
...
So what does this mean?  Reentry somewhere?

My guess?  Reentry before the coast of Africa.  (A 1 km/s deficit is a lot.)
Anyone care to do the math?
6575 m/s at 531 km for T+07:21, with that speed including Manley's estimated 700 m/s of loft.

We get to see another minute of telemetry (contradicting what I said earlier), with final values of 6518 m/s at 570 km for T+08:20, so a more precise calculation of angle could be made.

Just remember that with a significant portion (~ 85%) of orbital velocity achieved, it is no longer a "flat Earth" calculation.

Online edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14715
  • Liked: 7176
  • Likes Given: 1147
That's five failures and two successes over the course of Rocket 3's flight history.
Two failures during first stage flight, two during second stage flight, and one due to fairing separation failure.  A little bit of everything.  Frustrating to have failures after successes, but note that the two most recent failures were both out of the Cape while the last two successes, including a success between the two failures, were both out of Kodiak.

Something like -1950 x 570 km, so very suborbital.  Probably Atlantic reentry.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 06/12/2022 10:50 pm by edkyle99 »

Offline niwax

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1321
  • Germany
    • SpaceX Booster List
  • Liked: 1859
  • Likes Given: 158
...
So what does this mean?  Reentry somewhere?

My guess?  Reentry before the coast of Africa.  (A 1 km/s deficit is a lot.)
Anyone care to do the math?
6575 m/s at 531 km for T+07:21, with that speed including Manley's estimated 700 m/s of loft.

We get to see another minute of telemetry (contradicting what I said earlier), with final values of 6518 m/s at 570 km for T+08:20, so a more precise calculation of angle could be made.

Just remember that with a significant portion (~ 85%) of orbital velocity achieved, it is no longer a "flat Earth" calculation.

https://twitter.com/planet4589/status/1536069497395810307
Quote
Slight revision: I estimate reentry about 400 km west of Dakar. I am now a bit more confident that the debris wouldn't have got quite as far as the African coast.
Which booster has the most soot? SpaceX booster launch history! (discussion)

Offline Michel Van

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 276
  • Liege, Belgium
  • Liked: 123
  • Likes Given: 132
So what went wrong ?
some speculation

it look almost redo of flight Rocket 3.2 were was issue with propellant mixture ratio
also issue with Second stage software flaw in the thrust vector system on flight LV0008

but this here look different
the engine stop combustion then spit gas out  first orange then white

Possible reasons:
a Combustion instability either slouch propellant or issue feed in propellants
or issue with valve in Helium pressurisation system or valve in propellants feedline to Engine.

some people in Twitter poiting out that stage was not flying stable and was wobbling.
if that was reason, i don't know the Video and Data feed was "Sluggish"
i hope Astra bring soon new data on this

Astra has for moment success rate of 22% !
and lost in total 6 satellite of paying customer,
they have to fix that issue fast or is Game Over !

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13255
  • UK
  • Liked: 3627
  • Likes Given: 220
Scott Manley’s take:


Offline OneSpeed

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1288
  • Liked: 3674
  • Likes Given: 1633
Here is a plot of the webcast telemetry from Astra LV0010.

Astra do not appear to use a throttle down for MaxQ, but there is an unusual artifact at around T+104s, where the acceleration appears to increase dramatically for about 6 seconds. From the telemetry, first motion is not until T+11s, so perhaps they are allowing the telemetry to catch up by a few seconds for separation?

The quality of the Astra telemetry is improving all the time, to the point that I can make a rough estimate of the Velocity Y component. From the plot, at SECO, it was around 750m/s.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 27751
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 51584
  • Likes Given: 22128
https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1536793959434813440

Quote
Zurbuchen, on Astra/TROPICS launch failure: after it happened, wondered if we should have done something different; concluded absolutely not. Mission costs $30M, three launches $9M, to get a new capability into the field. #AAS240

Offline king1999

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 417
  • F-Niner Fan
  • Atlanta, GA
  • Liked: 282
  • Likes Given: 1265
Zurbuchen, on Astra/TROPICS launch failure: after it happened, wondered if we should have done something different; concluded absolutely not. Mission costs $30M, three launches $9M, to get a new capability into the field. #AAS240
I understand they had to say that in public. But that's not a good attitude to have in engineering. You can ALWAYS have done something better, be it more analysis, more testing or better modeling etc. If it was a problem you didn't anticipate, you would need to have a better fault tree.

Offline Redclaws

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 689
  • Liked: 797
  • Likes Given: 938
Zurbuchen, on Astra/TROPICS launch failure: after it happened, wondered if we should have done something different; concluded absolutely not. Mission costs $30M, three launches $9M, to get a new capability into the field. #AAS240
I understand they had to say that in public. But that's not a good attitude to have in engineering. You can ALWAYS have done something better, be it more analysis, more testing or better modeling etc. If it was a problem you didn't anticipate, you would need to have a better fault tree.

Zurbuchen is the NASA administrator in charge of the acquisition, so not part of the engineering team.  He’s saying he’s happy to have bought launches in this risky way.

Offline TrevorMonty


Zurbuchen, on Astra/TROPICS launch failure: after it happened, wondered if we should have done something different; concluded absolutely not. Mission costs $30M, three launches $9M, to get a new capability into the field. #AAS240
I understand they had to say that in public. But that's not a good attitude to have in engineering. You can ALWAYS have done something better, be it more analysis, more testing or better modeling etc. If it was a problem you didn't anticipate, you would need to have a better fault tree.

Zurbuchen is the NASA administrator in charge of the acquisition, so not part of the engineering team.  He’s saying he’s happy to have bought launches in this risky way.

TROPICS was good choice for risky launch. Being small constellation easy enough to build couple replacements.

Best save more expensive one off satellites for more reliable LV.
« Last Edit: 06/16/2022 12:18 am by zubenelgenubi »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31570
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 19841
  • Likes Given: 3277
Astra do not appear to use a throttle down for MaxQ, but there is an unusual artifact at around T+104s, where the acceleration appears to increase dramatically for about 6 seconds. From the telemetry, first motion is not until T+11s, so perhaps they are allowing the telemetry to catch up by a few seconds for separation?

Maybe its a change from relative velocity to inertial velocity.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline OneSpeed

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1288
  • Liked: 3674
  • Likes Given: 1633
Maybe its a change from relative velocity to inertial velocity.

Perhaps, but why is the elapsed time from first motion to MECO about 6 seconds longer on the video feed than for the telemetry?

Video Elapsed      02.56
Telemetry Elapsed   02.50

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 35998
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 18440
  • Likes Given: 397
Zurbuchen, on Astra/TROPICS launch failure: after it happened, wondered if we should have done something different; concluded absolutely not. Mission costs $30M, three launches $9M, to get a new capability into the field. #AAS240
I understand they had to say that in public. But that's not a good attitude to have in engineering. You can ALWAYS have done something better, be it more analysis, more testing or better modeling etc. If it was a problem you didn't anticipate, you would need to have a better fault tree.

NASA is only buying a service.  It doesn't manage the launch vehicle.   He is only referring to the risk of using Astra

Offline edzieba

  • Virtual Realist
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4433
  • United Kingdom
  • Liked: 6477
  • Likes Given: 35
Maybe its a change from relative velocity to inertial velocity.

Perhaps, but why is the elapsed time from first motion to MECO about 6 seconds longer on the video feed than for the telemetry?

Video Elapsed      02.56
Telemetry Elapsed   02.50
Video delay may be variable over time, or even at the same time between shots. Add to that the latencies of receiving the telemetry, generating the pretty-printed video overlay, overlaying that onto the muxed final video mix, and adding any additional intentional time delay to the final mix, and there's no guarantee a video feed will resemble real-time.
This is not unusual: we see on SpaceX's broadcasts that sequence callouts occur 'before' video of those activities (e.g. fairing sep) due to video delay, or landing shots from the droneship showing the vehicle has landed on one angle and still descending in the angle shown next to it.
For the public feed getting something out is prioritised over timing precision. Accurately timed and synchronised video footage can be reconstructed from embedded timecodes offline at a later date if needed.

Offline OneSpeed

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1288
  • Liked: 3674
  • Likes Given: 1633
Maybe its a change from relative velocity to inertial velocity.

Perhaps, but why is the elapsed time from first motion to MECO about 6 seconds longer on the video feed than for the telemetry?

Video Elapsed      02.56
Telemetry Elapsed   02.50
Video delay may be variable over time, or even at the same time between shots. Add to that the latencies of receiving the telemetry, generating the pretty-printed video overlay, overlaying that onto the muxed final video mix, and adding any additional intentional time delay to the final mix, and there's no guarantee a video feed will resemble real-time.
This is not unusual: we see on SpaceX's broadcasts that sequence callouts occur 'before' video of those activities (e.g. fairing sep) due to video delay, or landing shots from the droneship showing the vehicle has landed on one angle and still descending in the angle shown next to it.
For the public feed getting something out is prioritised over timing precision. Accurately timed and synchronised video footage can be reconstructed from embedded timecodes offline at a later date if needed.

Telemetry is often offset from the video, but for each camera, the offset is constant. The telemetry stream might pause due to a loss of signal, but if it resumes, it always catches back up to the same offset.

That's not what we are seeing here. There is a six second period where the rate of the relay of information has roughly doubled. After that period, the offset has been shifted by about six seconds, and remains that way.

If you've seen something similar in another webcast, please point me to it.

Offline edzieba

  • Virtual Realist
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4433
  • United Kingdom
  • Liked: 6477
  • Likes Given: 35
but for each camera, the offset is constant
The offset is constant across all cameras (post-MUX), not for each camera, as there is a delay offset between cameras.
e.g.:
- Telemetry shows launch at t-0
- Pad cam shows launch at t+5 (5s delay for hardline pad feed)
- Pad cam switches to on-board cam, on board cam has a 10s delay due to relay via local compression, direct to ground telemetry, then decompression
- Telemetry shows shutdown at t+100
- On-board cam shows shutdown at t+110 (10s delay)
- Difference between launch and shutdown times based on video feed is 110s - 5s = 105s
There is now a 5s phantom mismatch between telemetry time and video feed time, due to the change in video delay between feeds. No mismatch exists in reality, it's an artefact of variable video latency. Adding to the headache is the same physical camera may be sending video through multiple routes (e.g. a direct to ground link local to the launch complex, a direct to ground link well downrange that uses its own satellite backhaul link to get back to the LCC, or relay via TDRS) at different points in the launch sequence.

We can make a reasonable estimate of velocities and timings form the on-screen telemetry repeater because it is a reasonable assumption that telemetry is processed in real-time to align timestamps and compensate for varying link latencies. That same assumption does not hold for the video feeds.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 27751
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 51584
  • Likes Given: 22128
https://astra.com/news/lv0010-launch-investigation-update/

Quote
LV0010 LAUNCH INVESTIGATION UPDATE
SEPTEMBER 28, 2022

The team has made significant progress in the investigation into the LV0010 early shutdown of the upper stage. Our investigation process consists of four core steps:

Flight Data Review
Timeline Reconstruction
Fault Tree Analyses
Implementing Corrective and Preventative Actions

We have completed steps #1 and #2, and are nearing completion of step #3. We’ve determined that the upper stage shut down early due to a higher-than-normal fuel consumption rate. Through the review of flight data, reconstruction of flight timelines, and the construction of an extensive fault tree, we have narrowed the root cause to an issue with the upper stage engine. We have also completed many rounds of ground testing, including multiple tests that yielded results consistent with the failure condition in flight.

The team is conducting additional experiments to verify the root cause before wrapping up the investigation with the FAA. We are focused on conducting an exhaustive investigation and ensuring that we extract all lessons learned.

Once the investigation is finished, we look forward to sharing our lessons learned in a future blog post.

Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement SkyTale Software GmbH
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
0