Author Topic: Artemis I Pre-Launch Testing at LC-39B (Leading up to and including all WDR's)  (Read 122966 times)

Offline Overwatchfan123

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Also, does anyone know as to what date rollout for launch looks like?

No.  You have been following this thread, correct?   The information is in it.

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=56107.msg2380403#msg2380403

When somebody knows it will be posted.  No need to ask.
OK, fine.
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Offline oldAtlas_Eguy

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List of variables that have to be quantified to be able to determine the roll out date for Launch:

- work platform: emplacement and later stowage. This should be easily quantifiable if all the access points are known. It is when additional platforms are determined to be needed after trying to perform a task that can cause a variation as well as when an issue occurs that prevents temporarily the emplacement or stowage. These two unknowns can cause an almost cascading problem in the roll-out schedule.

- identified troubleshooting and fixes. These items are now mostly a guess until work on them get started which will determine more about the amount of work and time involved in completing them. These items are highly variable currently in the amount of time needed.

- pyro install. This should be already well defined with a quantity including some schedule pad (hopefully). This task cannot be accomplished simultaneously with other tasks because of minimal personnel in bay requirements regarding pyro devices.

- FTS final setup and certification. This also should be already well defined with a quantity including some schedule pad. This is the last task before the button up which is the platform stowage that are needed to do the FTS tasks.

- and finally the last consideration and variable is to determine which launch period can be reached where a roll-out can be done at 3 days to 10 days prior to the beginning of the period. This item is the one that determines if the vehicle sits and waits in the VAB prior to doing the FTS cert task or moves ahead immediately to get out to the pad. Launch periods start dates occur every 28 days. The last for only 14/15 days. Enough days have to be still available to launch in to take in the possibility of minor issues or weather. The first launch day is approximately 10 days after roll-out due to all the setup tasks that have to be completed prior to being able to launch.

If the unknown tasks/issues resolutions duration are in total less than 21 days then the Aug/Sep launch period is achievable. But the last unknown unknown is the weather. August is one of the 2 highest tropical cyclone weather months along with the other which is September.

All of this at the moment is why NASA will not set a roll-out date until well into the troubleshoot/repair tasks so that a defined remaining work to be accomplished before roll-out is established.

Offline jadebenn

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Not really.  Cape Canaveral has more name recognition.
I'll give you the name, but I don't think it's more recognizable to the public. Certainly not visually.
« Last Edit: 07/04/2022 12:07 am by jadebenn »

Offline Jim

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Not really.  Cape Canaveral has more name recognition.
I'll give you the name, but I don't think it's more recognizable to the public. Certainly not visually.

Nah, not that either

Offline jadebenn

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Nah, not that either
Right. Not like the VAB, LCC, or pads A and B are the only pieces of ground infrastructure a layman would even have a chance at recognizing. Those things have absolutely no pop cultural presence at all compared to the storied and infallible cape. ::)
« Last Edit: 07/04/2022 05:45 am by jadebenn »

Offline russianhalo117

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Nah, not that either
Right. Not like the VAB, LCC, or pads A and B are the only pieces of ground infrastructure a layman would even have a chance at recognizing. Those things have absolutely no pop cultural presence at all compared to the storied and infallible cape. ::)
Well going by the original naming which I still agree by everything is just Cape Canaveral because they are on a Cape called Canaveral.

That settles that off topic debate in the wrong thread.
« Last Edit: 07/04/2022 06:13 am by russianhalo117 »

Offline Vahe231991

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Online Conexion Espacial

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Work Continues to Prepare Artemis I Moon Rocket for Launch 


Since the Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion arrived back at the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 2, teams extended the access platforms surrounding the rocket and spacecraft to perform repairs and conduct final operations before returning to launch pad 39B for the Artemis I mission. 


Technicians are working to inspect, fix, and check out equipment associated with a seal on the quick disconnect of the tail service mast umbilical that was identified as the source of a hydrogen leak during the wet dress rehearsal test that ended June 20. Engineers have disconnected the umbilical and are in the process of examining the area where they will replace two seals on the quick disconnect hardware. Working in tandem with those repairs, engineers also completed the last remaining engineering test that is part of the integrated testing operations in the VAB. 


Teams also performed additional planned work on aspects of the rocket and spacecraft. Engineers swapped out a computer on the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage called the Inertial Navigation and Control Assembly unit that was used during wet dress rehearsal activities with the one that will be used for flight and will test the unit next week. The newly installed flight unit includes freshly calibrated inertial navigation sensors and updated software to guide and navigate the upper stage during flight. 


Technicians also activated several batteries for the rocket elements, including for the solid rocket boosters and the ICPS. The batteries on the core stage will be activated in the coming weeks, and all the batteries will then be installed. The batteries provide power for the rocket elements during the final portion of the countdown on launch day and through ascent. 


Engineers also charged the batteries for the secondary payloads located on the Orion stage adapter and will work to install payloads inside the Orion spacecraft in the coming weeks. 
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Offline cplchanb

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« Last Edit: 07/09/2022 12:37 am by cplchanb »

Online Conexion Espacial

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Progress Continues Toward Artemis I Launch

Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians continue to prepare the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft for Artemis I. 


During work to repair the source of a hydrogen leak, engineers identified a loose fitting on the inside wall of the rocket’s engine section, where the quick disconnect for the liquid hydrogen umbilical attaches. The component, called a “collet,” is a fist-sized ring that guides the quick disconnect during assembly operations. Teams will repair the collet by entering the engine section in parallel with other planned work for launch preparations. Technicians have replaced the seals on the quick disconnect of the tail service mast umbilical and will reattach the umbilical plate once the loose collet is addressed. 


NASA continues to target the late August launch period and will identify a specific target launch date after engineers have examined the collet.


Technicians continue work associated with battery activations, and plan to turn on the core stage batteries this weekend, before they are installed on the rocket. Next up, teams will start the flight termination systems operations, which include removing the core stage and booster safe and arm devices for calibration and removing and replacing the command receiver decoders with the flight units. The safe and arm devices are a manual mechanism that put the flight termination system in either a “safe” or “arm” configuration while the command receiver decoders receive and decode the command on the rocket if the system is activated.


Meanwhile on the Orion spacecraft, teams installed a technology demonstration that will test digital assistance and video collaboration in deep space. Engineers are also conducting powered testing on the crew module and European service module heaters and sensors. 
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Offline yg1968

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Offline centaurinasa

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« Last Edit: 07/20/2022 09:59 am by centaurinasa »
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Offline jadebenn

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Time to see if it's LP25 or LP26.

Online Khadgars

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Time to see if it's LP25 or LP26.

Are those launch opportunities?
Evil triumphs when good men do nothing - Thomas Jefferson

Offline jadebenn

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Are those launch opportunities?
They're the launch periods that contain launch opportunities. LP25 is late August - early September, LP26 is mid September - early October.
« Last Edit: 07/20/2022 03:00 pm by jadebenn »

Online Khadgars

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Are those launch opportunities?
They're the launch periods that contain launch opportunities. LP25 is late August - early September, LP26 is mid September - early October.

That's what I thought, thanks for confirming.
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Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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New thread started for Artemis I launch, now there’s a specific target date:

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=56782.0

In the "Missions to the Moon" sub-forum.
« Last Edit: 07/21/2022 02:54 am by zubenelgenubi »

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