Author Topic: Artemis I Pre-Launch Testing at LC-39B (Leading up to and including all WDR's)  (Read 123086 times)

Offline Remes

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slightly better exposure

Offline Conexion Espacial

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Offline Conexion Espacial

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Artemis I Wet Dress Rehearsal Status



In continued preparations for the Artemis I wet dress rehearsal  test, with tanking targeted for Monday, teams encountered an issue maintaining helium purge pressure on the upper stage engine after change-out of a regulator on the mobile launcher. The RL10 engine on the upper stage uses helium to purge the engine and also to activate upper stage valves during wet dress rehearsal operations. After initial troubleshooting, the team reestablished normal helium purge, and is continuing work to determine the cause of a restriction in the helium flow. Engineers will conduct troubleshooting tomorrow to confirm and characterize system performance. If needed, the mission management team will meet Sunday to disposition any adjustments in the procedures or modifications in test objectives as necessary. After the wet dress rehearsal test, SLS and Orion will return to the Vehicle Assembly Building, and engineers will conduct additional inspections of the related flight systems to further evaluate system performance. The Space Launch System rocket, the Orion spacecraft, and the supporting ground system elements remain in stable condition.


The countdown for the two-day test is currently slated to begin with call to stations beginning at 5 pm EDT on Saturday, April 9 with T-0 planned for 2:40 pm on Monday, April 11. While engineers investigate the issue, teams continue to refine the test schedule to account for insights gained during the previous runs and activities, or test objectives, that were completed earlier this week and no longer need to be included in the next test run, such as configuring ground support equipment. Pending additional analysis, NASA expects to have a forward plan tomorrow for wet dress rehearsal testing.


Check back at this blog for an update on wet dress rehearsal testing for the Artemis I mission. NASA is streaming live video of the rocket and spacecraft on the Kennedy Newsroom YouTube channel. Real-time updates will be provided on the Exploration Ground Systems Twitter account with “go” for tanking.
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Offline eeergo

Looks like the KSC webcams, no longer public, are not dead yet either!

https://twitter.com/TJ_Cooney/status/1512420885713633285
« Last Edit: 04/08/2022 02:22 pm by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Offline Conexion Espacial

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Now that the Ax-1 mission has launched, NASA has the times and spaces to try the WDR again, they are still working on the problems presented this week. The schedule for this new WDR attempt will be the same as last week's original, with the same start times, procedures and T-0, if you want to see the complete WDR schedule with estimated dates at different times to program your schedule you can check the following link: https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=56107.msg2356158#msg2356158
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Offline su27k

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https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1512575981692805124

Quote
SLS needs to return to Call To Stations on Saturday to begin the countdown for Monday.

However, it's becoming possible that's been postponed as the Mission Management Team (MMT) discusses troubleshooting options that will either set a new WDR timeline or roll back to the VAB.

Offline Conexion Espacial

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The WDR would no longer be scheduled for this weekend, it would be attempted this Tuesday with a T-0 on Thursday.https://twitter.com/spaceflightnow/status/1512625708526444545
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Offline [email protected]

« Last Edit: 04/09/2022 11:58 am by [email protected] »
My parents was just being born when the Apollo program is over. Why we are still stuck in this stagnation, let's go forward again

Offline Conexion Espacial

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Artemis I Wet Dress Rehearsal Update



NASA is planning to proceed with a modified wet dress rehearsal, primarily focused on tanking the core stage, and minimal propellant operations on the interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) with the ground systems at Kennedy. Due to the changes in loading procedures required for the modified test, wet dress rehearsal testing is slated to resume with call to stations on Tuesday, April 12 and tanking on Thursday, April 14. Wet dress rehearsal is an opportunity to refine the countdown procedures and validate critical models and software interfaces. The modified test will enable engineers to achieve the test objectives critical to launch success. 


Engineers have identified a helium check valve that is not functioning as expected, requiring these changes to ensure safety of the flight hardware. Helium is used for several different operations, including purging the engine, or clearing the lines, prior to loading propellants during tanking, as well as draining propellant. A check valve is a type of valve that allows liquid or gas to flow in a particular direction and prevents backflow. The helium check valve is about three inches long and prevents the helium from flowing back out of the rocket.


Following the modified test, the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft will return to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) where engineers will evaluate the valve and replace if needed. Teams are confident in the ability to replace the valve once back in the VAB.  


NASA will host a teleconference to discuss details on Monday, April 11. Check back at this blog for an update on the countdown timeline prior to the modified wet dress rehearsal testing for the Artemis I mission. NASA is streaming live video of the rocket and spacecraft on the Kennedy Newsroom YouTube channel.
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Offline centaurinasa

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To boldly go where no human has gone before !

Offline centaurinasa

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Offline Targeteer

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April 11, 2022
MEDIA ADVISORY  M22-047
NASA to Discuss Plans Today for Artemis Moon Mission Modified Test

NASA will hold a media teleconference at 4 p.m. EDT today, Monday, April 11, to provide an update on the final major test of the agency’s mega Moon rocket and spacecraft on the launch pad at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida ahead of the uncrewed Artemis I lunar mission.

The teleconference will stream live on the agency’s website.

NASA is planning to proceed with a modified wet dress rehearsal test focused on using the ground systems at Kennedy to load propellant into the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage tanks, with minimal propellant operations on the upper stage. In addition to loading propellant, the wet dress rehearsal is an opportunity to refine countdown procedures and validate critical models and software interfaces. The team achieved many of the wet dress rehearsal objectives during the two prior tests, and the modified test will enable engineers to achieve the remaining test objectives critical to launch success. 

Teleconference participants include:

    Tom Whitmeyer, deputy associate administrator for common exploration systems development, NASA Headquarters in Washington
    Charlie Blackwell-Thompson, Artemis launch director, NASA Exploration Ground Systems program, Kennedy
    John Blevins, SLS chief engineer, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama
    Mike Sarafin, Artemis mission manager, NASA Headquarters

To participate by telephone, media must RSVP to NASA no later than one hour prior to the start of the event to: [email protected]

Following the previous test run, engineers identified an issue with a helium check valve that was not functioning as expected, requiring changes to the test to ensure safety of the flight hardware. Due to the time needed to adjust loading procedures, testing is scheduled to resume with call to stations on Tuesday, April 12 and tanking on Thursday, April 14.

Through Artemis missions, NASA will land the first woman and the first person of color on the Moon, paving the way for a long-term lunar presence and serving as a steppingstone to send astronauts to Mars.

For updates, follow along on NASA’s Artemis blog at:

https://blogs.nasa.gov/artemis/
« Last Edit: 04/11/2022 02:31 pm by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline yg1968

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Media Briefing: Artemis I Wet Dress Rehearsal Status Update



Source: twitter.com/genejm29/status/1513607785845514245
« Last Edit: 04/11/2022 10:12 pm by yg1968 »

Offline sdsds

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Some notes on their verbal description of the problem, taken from the media teleconference.

At 14:40 or thereabouts, Charlie Blackwell-Thomson (Launch Director) says:
During post-ops from wet dress run number 2 some helium leakage was identified from a helium supply inlet fitting down in the ML base. Control regulator that ultimately provides pressure to the upper stage COPVs. Team went in to do troubleshooting. Replaced the leaking component. Reduced COPV pressure as part of the troubleshooting. When part was repaired, they didn't see the expected pressure on the upper stage COPVs.. Friday determined the issue was on the flight side of the interface.

John Blevins, MSFC, says:
Vehicle in great condition except this one condition. Modified WDR really will cover majority of what we're interested in, even APUs on boosters. Much more than just a tanking test. During ICPS testing after ground system component switched out we detected an inoperative check valve, we did reverse flow check, which failed. The part is 1-1/8th inch diameter, 3 inches long; connects two half inch lines. It's a high reliability part so this is an unexpected outcome. Don't have great access to it on the pad; easy access when back in the VAB. Mounted to a structural board inside the ICPS. Hesitate to speculate why it isn't operating right because in a week and half we'll know. Easy to find out when it occurred. PSET (program specific engineering testing). EGS/SLS partnership <?> So it happened when we re-pressurized the system after the other component was changed.

« Last Edit: 04/12/2022 01:13 am by sdsds »
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Offline eeergo

A few other salient points to build upon sdsds' summary above:

- Helium valve is the only vehicle-side flight hardware issue so far.
- 3 commanding functions during coundown on ICPS which won't be completed (out of about 80). Two of 25 "critical events" are exclusively ICPS, so 23 will be tested.
- No concerns regarding secondary payloads (i.e. charge levels which can be topped up in VAB after rollback).
- T0 planned for 2.40 pm EDT on Thursday.
- WDR-to-rollback: around 10 days.
-DaviD-

Online kdhilliard

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Also from Monday's media briefing:
- The ICPS Helium COPV fill path runs up the Mobile Launcher, through the ML-side Quick Disconnect valve, through the ICPS-side QD valve, then through the faulty check valve and on to the 8 He COPVs.
- The check valve's purpose is to prevent leakage in case the ICPS-side QD valve fails to seal at launch.
- The check valve is still passing He in the forward direction (it is not failed closed), but it is not sealing to prevent reverse flow as it should.
- It was implied, but not explicitly stated, that the full WDR could be carried out despite the faulty check valve were it not for safety concerns.  Unfortunately the reporters didn't press them on that, but I assume the concern is that if a leak developed in the ML He plumbing, then they'd loose COPV pressure.  He from those COPVs is used to condition the ICPS's RL-10 engine and for ullage fill during detanking.
- The modified WDR will include ICPS chill-down and thus will test the QDs for leaks.
- No decision on future plans (such as whether an additional, full WDR will be required after the ICPS is repaired) will be made until the modified WDR is conducted and all the data are examined.  They hinted that if everything else went well and the data they did get from ICPS (temperature readings, etc.) validated their models, then the next rollout would be for a launch attempt, but that this would require the vehicle passing a Flight Readiness Review with appropriate Flight Rationale.
- If they did want to conduct a future fill test of the ICPS, it would require the Core Stage to be filled as well.  The ICPS cannot be filled on top an empty Core Stage.
« Last Edit: 04/12/2022 02:56 pm by kdhilliard »

Offline eeergo

Is there a scheduled time for today's call to stations? I might have missed it in the audio...
-DaviD-

Offline Khadgars

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A few other salient points to build upon sdsds' summary above:

- Helium valve is the only vehicle-side flight hardware issue so far.
- 3 commanding functions during coundown on ICPS which won't be completed (out of about 80). Two of 25 "critical events" are exclusively ICPS, so 23 will be tested.
- No concerns regarding secondary payloads (i.e. charge levels which can be topped up in VAB after rollback).
- T0 planned for 2.40 pm EDT on Thursday.
- WDR-to-rollback: around 10 days.

Question on the bold above.  That is stating once WDR is complete, it will be 10 days before they roll back to VAB?
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Offline woods170

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A few other salient points to build upon sdsds' summary above:

- Helium valve is the only vehicle-side flight hardware issue so far.
- 3 commanding functions during coundown on ICPS which won't be completed (out of about 80). Two of 25 "critical events" are exclusively ICPS, so 23 will be tested.
- No concerns regarding secondary payloads (i.e. charge levels which can be topped up in VAB after rollback).
- T0 planned for 2.40 pm EDT on Thursday.
- WDR-to-rollback: around 10 days.

Question on the bold above.  That is stating once WDR is complete, it will be 10 days before they roll back to VAB?
Yes.

For the same reason WDR did not start immediately after rollout. There is a lot of stuff that needs to be safed and powered-down on SLS and the ML and also a lot of pad systems that need to be unhooked from the ML.

 

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