Author Topic: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - May 2024  (Read 15674 times)

Offline eeergo

Artemis I has a fully stacked vehicle (sans S/C for now) at KSC, and Artemis II's CS is coming along, with its forward join composite (LOX+intertank+upper flange) fully assembled, SRBs fabricated and in storage, and LH2 tank and LVSA structurally complete. A new DISCUSSION thread for the mission now exists, provisionally combined with Artemis III: https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=54243.0
The threads for the Orion S/C are in the dedicated subforum (CM: https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=43770.25 / SM: ).

Thought it'd be worthwhile to have a separated thread now that all elements for the first crewed Artemis / SLS / Orion mission are entering final construction ahead of transportation to KSC.
« Last Edit: 06/11/2022 03:19 am by zubenelgenubi »
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« Last Edit: 06/11/2022 02:54 am by zubenelgenubi »

Offline pochimax

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Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #3 on: 08/08/2021 06:20 am »
I picked this image, since it shows the forward join in the background.

https://images.nasa.gov/details-MAF_2021%200708_CS2_ESBTlift016

Artemis II Engine Section and Boat-tail Joined

Technicians at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility have joined the engine and boat-tail sections of NASA’s Space Launch System rocket for Artemis II in preparation for its next step in production. When complete, the engine section will house the four RS-25 engines and include vital systems for mounting, controlling and delivering fuel from the propellant tanks to the rocket’s engines. The boat-tail is designed to protect the bottom end of the core stage and the RS-25 engines and was joined with the engine section to comprise the lowest portion of the 212-foot-tall core stage. Together with its four RS-25 engines and its twin solid rocket boosters, it will produce 8.8 million pounds of thrust to send NASA’s Orion spacecraft, astronauts, and supplies beyond Earth’s orbit to the Moon and, ultimately, Mars. Offering more payload mass, volume capability, and energy to speed missions through space, the SLS rocket, along with NASA’s Gateway in lunar orbit, the Human Landing System, and Orion spacecraft, is part of NASA’s backbone for deep space exploration and the Artemis lunar program. No other rocket is capable of carrying astronauts in Orion around the Moon in a single mission.
« Last Edit: 06/11/2022 02:54 am by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline Khadgars

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Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #4 on: 08/17/2021 08:03 pm »
The Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage for the second flight of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket arrived in Florida on July 28 for the final phase of production. The stage and its single RL10 engine provide the in-space propulsion needed to send NASA’s Orion spacecraft and its crew on a precise trajectory to the Moon for Artemis II, the first crewed mission of NASA’s Artemis lunar missions. It is the first piece of the rocket for the Artemis II flight to arrive in Florida. Boeing and United Launch Alliance, the contractor team for the stage, shipped the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage from ULA’s facilities in Decatur, Alabama, to its Delta IV Operation Center at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. The stage will undergo final processing and checkout before it is transported to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center for launch preparations.

With Artemis, NASA will land the first woman and the first person of color on the lunar surface and establish long-term exploration at the Moon in preparation for human missions to Mars. SLS and NASA’s Orion spacecraft, along with the commercial human landing system and the Gateway in orbit around the Moon, are NASA’s backbone for deep space exploration. SLS is the only rocket that can send Orion, astronauts, and supplies to the Moon in a single mission.

Image Credit: ULA

Last Updated: Aug 17, 2021
Editor: Jennifer Harbaugh

https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/first-piece-of-artemis-ii-flight-hardware-arrives-in-florida.html
« Last Edit: 08/17/2021 08:05 pm by Khadgars »
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Offline Overwatchfan123

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Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #5 on: 08/18/2021 06:27 am »
That is amazing!
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Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #6 on: 08/19/2021 05:33 pm »
https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1428406490918887429

Quote
#unboxing Thursday… At the HIF, ICPS-2 is removed from its protective shipping container before moving to the Delta Operations Center (DOC) for processing.  #ToryTimelapse

Offline eeergo

Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #7 on: 11/15/2021 02:58 pm »
From today's published OIG report: https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-22-003.pdf

Quote
Artemis II is currently scheduled to launch in late 2023, though NASA is likely to face schedule delays due to the reuse and installation of Orion components following Artemis Iand a tight delivery schedule of the Orion service module. This avionics reuse, which is driven entirely by when the Orion capsule returns from its first mission, is considered the primary critical path for Artemis II. [...] [However], NASA has attempted to mitigate Artemis II’s schedule risk by initiating the purchase of an additional set of avionics should the Artemis I launch schedule continue to slip, thereby decoupling the Artemis II launch schedule from Artemis I.

As could be deduced already weeks ago:

Artemis 2 mission delayed to May 2024 and Artemis 3 to 2025. The latter is blamed on the protests and lawsuits, but the manner in which both 2 and 3 could have gone in 2024 is left unstated ...

[...]Artemis II is NET Nov '23 and NLT May '24, which is quite different to NET May 2024!
[...]
« Last Edit: 06/11/2022 02:57 am by zubenelgenubi »
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Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #8 on: 11/19/2021 02:34 am »
An update on production of the components for the Artemis 2 mission:
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2021/11/orion-spacecraft-production/

Offline eeergo

Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #9 on: 12/17/2021 03:33 pm »
The upper build (LOX tank, interstage and forward skirt) is complete for Artemis-II's SLS core. Next up is joining the LH2 tank, before the engine section completes the stage.

https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/completed-upper-part-of-artemis-ii-core-stage.html
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Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #10 on: 12/31/2021 01:00 am »
Construction of the rocket hardware for Artemis 2 is thankfully picking up the pace, and it's possible that by the time that the Artemis 1 mission launches, then construction of the Artemis 2 rocket hardware could reach 75 percent completion.

Offline Yiosie

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Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #11 on: 01/19/2022 09:31 pm »
https://twitter.com/genejm29/status/1483868176735735815

Quote
#NASA #NAC #HEO - These are the milestones remaining for Artemis 2, looking forward to the deliveries of the ICPS, we have upgrades on the pad we need to do, then at that point that will complete the hardware end of it. Won't have to do some of the Mods we did in Artemis 1

Online whitelancer64

Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #12 on: 01/20/2022 06:02 am »
*yeet tweet*

Quote
#NASA #NAC #HEO - These are the milestones remaining for Artemis 2, looking forward to the deliveries of the ICPS, we have upgrades on the pad we need to do, then at that point that will complete the hardware end of it. Won't have to do some of the Mods we did in Artemis 1

That whole twitter thread is fantastic!!!
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Offline cplchanb

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Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #13 on: 01/20/2022 04:19 pm »
Wasnt there a photo of the ICPS for A2 already delivered? Is it still incomplete?

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Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #14 on: 02/03/2022 01:44 pm »
Artemis II Service Module in O&C Highbay Clean Room

The European-built Service Module (ESM) for NASA’s Artemis II mission is on a work stand inside a clean room inside the high bay of the Neil A. Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Jan. 12, 2022. Teams from NASA, Lockheed Martin, the European Space Agency and Airbus will prepare the service module to be integrated with the Orion crew module adapter and crew module, already housed in the facility. The powerhouse that will fuel and propel Orion in space, the ESM for Artemis II will be the first Artemis mission flying crew aboard Orion.
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Offline Khadgars

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Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #15 on: 02/03/2022 03:12 pm »
Wasnt there a photo of the ICPS for A2 already delivered? Is it still incomplete?

Yes, its complete.  See my post up thread.
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Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #16 on: 02/08/2022 04:39 pm »

NASA Prepares to Join Two Major Parts for Artemis II Core Stage



Technicians are preparing to connect two major parts of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s Artemis II core stage. On Jan. 30, technicians moved the largest part of the stage, the 130-foot liquid hydrogen tank to the vertical assembly area at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility. Here, it will be prepared for joining with the 66-foot forward assembly.


The forward assembly comprised of the joined forward skirt, intertank, and liquid oxygen tank completed construction and was transported to the final assembly area inside the factory on Jan. 10. Technicians will move the liquid hydrogen tank back to this final assembly where Boeing, the lead core stage contractor, will join the two structures. This will complete construction of most of the core stage that will launch the first crew on the Artemis II mission.


Only the engine section, the fifth piece of the stage, will need to be added to complete the Artemis II core stage. The engine section is one of the most complex parts of the stage. It includes the main propulsion system that connects to the four RS-25 engines that are built by Aerojet Rocketdyne and are assembled and stored at their facility at NASA’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The engines will be the last items installed on the stage. During launch, more than 700,000 gallons of propellant flows from the core stage tanks to the engines that produce more than 2 million pounds of thrust to help launch the SLS rocket.


The core stage serves as the backbone of the rocket, supporting the weight of the payload, upper stage, and Orion crew vehicle, as well as the thrust of its four RS-25 engines and two five-segment solid rocket boosters attached to the engine and intertank sections. The Artemis II mission will help NASA prepare for later Artemis missions that will enable the first woman and first person of color to land on the Moon.
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Offline eeergo

Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2024
« Reply #17 on: 03/22/2022 08:22 am »
Second SLS core's tank assembly is being joined (still missing the engine section that'd complete the stage):
https://twitter.com/ThePrimalDino/status/1506016961485946880
« Last Edit: 03/22/2022 08:22 am by eeergo »
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Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - 2H 2023
« Reply #18 on: 04/01/2022 02:04 pm »

A timelapse showing how the two main tanks of the SLS center stage for Artemis II were joined together.https://twitter.com/nasa_sls/status/1509614300884869122
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATE thread - May 2024
« Reply #19 on: 06/11/2022 03:16 am »
Cross-post; high-resolution photo attached to source post:

Engineers Power Up Crew Module for First Artemis Mission with Astronauts

The Orion crew module for Artemis II was powered on for the first time May 27 inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This capsule will carry astronauts on a trip around the Moon during the first crewed Artemis mission and helps set the stage for future lunar landing missions through Artemis.


With initial power-on complete, the crew module will undergo a three-part test over several months which includes applying power to each of the eight power and data units that help provide communication between Orion’s flight computers to its components. In addition, teams will begin installing the forward bay cover, which protect the top part of the crew module as the capsule blazes back through Earth’s atmosphere at speeds of up to 25,000 mph at the end of its mission


With Artemis, NASA will land the first woman and the first person of color on the Moon and establish long-term exploration in preparation for missions to Mars. The Space Launch System rocket and Orion, along with the commercial human landing system and the Gateway that will orbit the Moon, are NASA’s backbone for deep space exploration.


Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
« Last Edit: 06/11/2022 03:18 am by zubenelgenubi »
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