Author Topic: FAILURE : Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)  (Read 32305 times)

Offline PM3

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #60 on: 12/15/2020 08:52 pm »
Does Astra have any Loss of Signal zones in receiving transmissions from the upper stage?

AFAIR yes. There was some comment about that in the DARPA Launch Challenge webcast.
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Offline brussell

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #61 on: 12/15/2020 09:05 pm »
https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/status/1338960965753315331

Quote
Astra says they are "getting final data confirmation" on whether Rocket 3.2 reached orbit.

Gossip is that they didn't make orbit by a few seconds. Some "fixable" anomaly.

Offline pb2000

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #62 on: 12/15/2020 09:17 pm »
Gossip is that they didn't make orbit by a few seconds. Some "fixable" anomaly.
Negative perigee or will they maybe eek out a few orbits??
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Offline Rocketdog2116

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #63 on: 12/15/2020 09:30 pm »
If it did make orbit it should be completing its first orbit around now.

Offline brussell

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #64 on: 12/15/2020 09:34 pm »
Gossip is that they didn't make orbit by a few seconds. Some "fixable" anomaly.
Negative perigee or will they maybe eek out a few orbits??

Negative perigee. Or I should say, less than Earth radius :)
« Last Edit: 12/15/2020 09:34 pm by brussell »

Offline Yellowstone10

500 meters per second short, alas.

https://twitter.com/lorengrush/status/1338977683594731523

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Chris Kemp on Astra's flight: "After reaching an altitude of 390 kilometers, which was our nominal orbital altitude, we reached a velocity of 7.2 kilometers per second... short of the orbital velocity of 7.68 kilometers per second."
« Last Edit: 12/15/2020 09:47 pm by Yellowstone10 »

Offline brussell

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #66 on: 12/15/2020 09:53 pm »
500 meters per second short, alas.

https://twitter.com/lorengrush/status/1338977683594731523

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Chris Kemp on Astra's flight: "After reaching an altitude of 390 kilometers, which was our nominal orbital altitude, we reached a velocity of 7.2 kilometers per second... short of the orbital velocity of 7.68 kilometers per second."

Interesting. At 5-6 G's which is typical at that point that's 8s-10s short. Sounds about right.

Offline Yellowstone10

Interesting. At 5-6 G's which is typical at that point that's 8s-10s short. Sounds about right.

Per Michael Sheetz, Astra said the upper stage shut down around T+6:00, which seems more than 8-10 seconds short of a usual launch timeline? Could point to a lower-thrust upper stage, but I don't know what nominal SECO would have been.

https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/status/1338977719799963654

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Rocket 3.2 reached Max Q at about T+00:57 seconds.
MECO at T+02:22
Stage sep at T+02:29
Upper stage shutdown at about T+06:00
« Last Edit: 12/15/2020 09:58 pm by Yellowstone10 »

Offline brussell

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #68 on: 12/15/2020 10:00 pm »
Interesting. At 5-6 G's which is typical at that point that's 8s-10s short. Sounds about right.

Per Michael Sheetz, Astra said the upper stage shut down around T+6:00, which seems more than 8-10 seconds short of a usual launch timeline? Could point to a lower-thrust upper stage, but I don't know what nominal SECO would have been.

https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/status/1338977719799963654

Quote
Rocket 3.2 reached Max Q at about T+00:57 seconds.
MECO at T+02:22
Stage sep at T+02:29
Upper stage shutdown at about T+06:00

If that's true that's much much shorter than the correct timeline. That doesn't sound right. It wouldn't make 7.2 km/s. Where is he getting that info?

Offline Yellowstone10

If that's true that's much much shorter than the correct timeline. That doesn't sound right. It wouldn't make 7.2 km/s. Where is he getting that info?

Ah - the following from Joey Roulette suggests that the 6 minutes was the length of the second-stage burn, not T+6:00:

https://twitter.com/joroulette/status/1338978341660073985

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Astra says its second shot at going to orbit was "historic," and the launch had a "fantastic and flawless count." Rocket hit maxQ 57 secs into flight, and after stage separation, the upper stage engine ignited and shut off nominally six minutes later after expending all its fuel.

That sounds more like it, and a couple tweets downthread he reports that the Astra CEO said they were 12-15 seconds short of nominal.
« Last Edit: 12/15/2020 10:03 pm by Yellowstone10 »

Offline brussell

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #70 on: 12/15/2020 10:06 pm »
If that's true that's much much shorter than the correct timeline. That doesn't sound right. It wouldn't make 7.2 km/s. Where is he getting that info?

Ah - the following from Joey Roulette suggests that the 6 minutes was the length of the second-stage burn, not T+6:00:

https://twitter.com/joroulette/status/1338978341660073985

Quote
Astra says its second shot at going to orbit was "historic," and the launch had a "fantastic and flawless count." Rocket hit maxQ 57 secs into flight, and after stage separation, the upper stage engine ignited and shut off nominally six minutes later after expending all its fuel.

That sounds more like it, and a couple tweets downthread he reports that the Astra CEO said they were 12-15 seconds short of nominal.

That's it.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #71 on: 12/15/2020 10:06 pm »
twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1338982770085916678

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Just finished a call with @Astra. Rocket was 0.5 m/s short of orbit. With a better fuel mixture in the upper stage it would have orbited. Apogee of 390km. Rocket 3.3 will carry a payload, and there will be no hardware or software changes. 🚀

https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1338983096159494144

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Also, and this is remarkable, they set up the Alaska launch site with five people, in a week, starting with four shipping containers and a concrete pad. That ... is really hard.

Edit to add:

https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1338983278259429377

Quote
Sorry that should be 0.5 km/s

« Last Edit: 12/15/2020 10:09 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline ZachS09

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #72 on: 12/15/2020 10:07 pm »
I hope the payload fairing DID manage to separate. It wasn’t tweeted out, so that might have been a factor to why orbit wasn’t achieved.
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Online Davidthefat

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #73 on: 12/15/2020 10:08 pm »
If that's true that's much much shorter than the correct timeline. That doesn't sound right. It wouldn't make 7.2 km/s. Where is he getting that info?

Ah - the following from Joey Roulette suggests that the 6 minutes was the length of the second-stage burn, not T+6:00:

https://twitter.com/joroulette/status/1338978341660073985

Quote
Astra says its second shot at going to orbit was "historic," and the launch had a "fantastic and flawless count." Rocket hit maxQ 57 secs into flight, and after stage separation, the upper stage engine ignited and shut off nominally six minutes later after expending all its fuel.

That sounds more like it, and a couple tweets downthread he reports that the Astra CEO said they were 12-15 seconds short of nominal.

Was it running rich the entire time?

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #74 on: 12/15/2020 10:16 pm »
You can fool some of the people some of the time, but you can't fool all of the people all of the time.

https://twitter.com/Astra/status/1338985732338139136

"Rocket launch startup Astra has joined an elite group of companies who can say their vehicle has actually made it to orbital space – earlier than expected."
« Last Edit: 12/15/2020 10:18 pm by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline lrk

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #75 on: 12/15/2020 10:20 pm »
I hope the payload fairing DID manage to separate. It wasn’t tweeted out, so that might have been a factor to why orbit wasn’t achieved.

If this picture from Scott Manley is representative of the actual configuration in-flight, then I think the upper stage is contained within the fairing.  So I think the fairing would have to seperate for the upper stage to deploy at all? 

This might also explain the apparent slight delay between them reporting MECO and stage separation, if the rocket had to coast for a short period to deploy the fairing and second stage outside of the atmosphere?

https://twitter.com/DJSnM/status/1338957105521311744

By the way I'm curious what the source of that photo was. 
« Last Edit: 12/15/2020 10:25 pm by lrk »

Offline brussell

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #76 on: 12/15/2020 10:23 pm »
You can fool some of the people some of the time, but you can't fool all of the people all of the time.

https://twitter.com/Astra/status/1338985732338139136

"Rocket launch startup Astra has joined an elite group of companies who can say their vehicle has actually made it to orbital space – earlier than expected."

"orbital space" ? I'm very confused...

Offline brussell

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #77 on: 12/15/2020 10:24 pm »
There is a very cool video of stage sep and second stage ignition in Linkedin. It will probably be up on twitter soon.

Offline brussell

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« Last Edit: 12/15/2020 10:28 pm by brussell »

Online Davidthefat

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Re: Astra Rocket 3.2 - Kodiak - December 15, 2020 (20:55 UTC)
« Reply #79 on: 12/15/2020 10:28 pm »
There is a very cool video of stage sep and second stage ignition in Linkedin. It will probably be up on twitter soon.

The little guy accelerated pretty quickly!

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