Author Topic: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)  (Read 73405 times)

Offline JayWee

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #300 on: 07/08/2022 04:28 pm »
By the way, why does it take four months for CAPSTONE to get to the moon instead of four days like the Apollo missions?
Quote from: Wiki
CAPSTONE will use a ballistic transfer to the Moon instead of a more conventional direct Hohmann transfer. [14] While trajectories of this type take much longer to reach their destination (about four months in this case, compared to about three days using a traditional direct transfer) they significantly reduce the propulsion requirements, which can increase the delivered mass. [15]
[15] = https://advancedspace.com/blt/

Offline jimvela

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #301 on: 07/08/2022 04:35 pm »
Based on the timeline and what we saw on DSN Now, they did a ton of blind commanding, got nothing, and then got it back 1-2 days later.  Sounds like a command loss timer expiration to me.

CLT response is what I thought as well.

...
In my own experience, missions would have have sent that command on a testbed (usually a flatsat) BEFORE doing it in flight.   
I wonder if there is a high fidelity hardware in the loop simulator available for this mission where that might have been caught.
...
Is this a standard for a cheap cubesat tho? The entire mission seems to be $16M. Half of that might have went to RocketLab.

I've seen higher budget smallsat missions in the 12U range with really good full fidelity simulators.
I've also seen missions where the only avaialable hardware was the actual flight (or protoflight) hardware. 

I could easily see where the only procured hardware would have been the flight IRIS radio and perhaps there isn't a spare/EM/Emualtor IRIS around in a testbed.

BTW, upthread I wondered about whether or not there was a Frontier series radio onboard, before I read the press kits and realized it was an IRIS. 

I still have reason to believe that there may be a Frontier radio onboard, though it isn't the primary (DSN) radio.  I haven't seen any description about what CAPSTONE is using for the space-to-space radio to communicate with LRO.  I don't believe there is firmware for an IRIS to do that. 

If there are both IRIS and Frontier-S radios on CAPSTONE, that's some pretty darned capable hardware, but it does leave one to specualte on whether or not there is a testbed available for these- based on available budget information for the mission. 

Even if it isn't a Frontier-S, there is some other radio onboard to communicate with LRO and that's not yet been disclosed as far as I know.

It will be VERY interesting to learn more as the mission progresses.


Online DanClemmensen

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #302 on: 07/08/2022 04:59 pm »
By the way, why does it take four months for CAPSTONE to get to the moon instead of four days like the Apollo missions?
Quote from: Wiki
CAPSTONE will use a ballistic transfer to the Moon instead of a more conventional direct Hohmann transfer. [14] While trajectories of this type take much longer to reach their destination (about four months in this case, compared to about three days using a traditional direct transfer) they significantly reduce the propulsion requirements, which can increase the delivered mass. [15]
[15] = https://advancedspace.com/blt/
Another comparison point: The Gateway PPE+HALO components will launch on a Falcon heavy and then take about nine months to reach NRHO using the PPE's ion drive.

Offline Conexion Espacial

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #303 on: 07/09/2022 07:38 pm »

NASA’s CAPSTONE Updates Maneuver Schedule on Journey to Moon



The team for NASA’s Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System Technology Operations and Navigation Experiment (CAPSTONE) is standing down from the trajectory correction maneuver scheduled for July 9 to perform additional analysis on the spacecraft’s performance. The mission team will make a determination whether the maneuver is still needed at this time, and updates will be provided. 


Trajectory correction maneuvers are thruster burns used to clean up expected variation in CAPSTONE’s orbit and more accurately target its path to the Moon. The maneuver scheduled for July 9 was to be part of CAPSTONE’s first series of trajectory corrections. CAPSTONE’s first trajectory correction maneuver on July 7 achieved about 90% of the objectives for this series of maneuvers. 


CAPSTONE remains healthy and on track to arrive to its lunar orbit on Nov. 13. Read more from Advanced Space, which owns and operates CAPSTONE on behalf of NASA.
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Offline whitelancer64

Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #304 on: 07/09/2022 07:56 pm »
...
In my own experience, missions would have have sent that command on a testbed (usually a flatsat) BEFORE doing it in flight.   
I wonder if there is a high fidelity hardware in the loop simulator available for this mission where that might have been caught.
...
Is this a standard for a cheap cubesat tho? The entire mission seems to be $16M. Half of that might have went to RocketLab.

Rocket Lab got $9.95 million for the launch. The cost for the CAPSTONE itself was $13.7 million.

There's also a ~$6 million budget for mission operations, the total is around $30 million.
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
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Offline Rondaz

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #305 on: 07/10/2022 01:14 am »
CAPSTONE mission team rescheduled today’s maneuver to review additional data & perform analysis to support spacecraft modeling maneuver performance. CAPSTONE's healthy & still scheduled to arrive to the Moon in 4 months..

https://twitter.com/AdvancedSpace/status/1545848154213457921

Offline Phil Stooke

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #306 on: 07/10/2022 06:43 am »
"By the way, why does it take four months for CAPSTONE to get to the moon instead of four days like the Apollo missions?"


The path they are following is extremely fuel-efficient.  If you go fast you have to slow down a lot at the other end.  The slower you go the less you need to push at the beginning and the less you have to slow down at the other end.  There are other aspects to it but this is a simple way to consider it.

Also Apollo couldn't go slowly and efficiently because of the need to keep the crew alive - has to be quick.
« Last Edit: 07/10/2022 06:45 am by Phil Stooke »

Offline Svetoslav

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #307 on: 07/12/2022 10:38 am »
Hm, I haven't seen any related activity on DSN during the past day. No downlink or uplink. Is that planned?

Offline Svetoslav

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #308 on: 07/12/2022 02:19 pm »
Ah, never mind. There's currently downlink.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #309 on: 07/12/2022 07:57 pm »
https://blogs.nasa.gov/artemis/2022/07/12/nasas-capstone-executes-new-maneuver-further-pinpoints-path-to-moon/

Quote
NASA’s CAPSTONE Executes New Maneuver, Further Pinpoints Path to Moon

NASA’s Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System Technology Operations and Navigation Experiment (CAPSTONE) successfully completed its second trajectory correction maneuver starting at about 11:30 a.m. EDT Tuesday.

CAPSTONE will perform several such maneuvers during its four-month-long journey to lunar orbit to refine its trajectory to the Moon, with the next one targeted for late July. CAPSTONE is taking a long but fuel-efficient route to the Moon, flying about 958,000 miles (1.54 million kilometers) from Earth before looping back around to its near rectilinear halo orbit.

Read more about CAPSTONE’s ambitious mission to the Moon.

Author Gianine Figliozzi / Posted on July 12, 2022 3:16 pm /
Categories Uncategorized / Tags CAPSTONE, Cubesats, Gateway, HALO, Moon, Moon to Mars, SpaceTech

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #310 on: 07/13/2022 04:54 pm »
#CAPSTONE is taking a fuel-efficient route to the Moon, flying about 958,000 miles (1.54 million kilometers) from Earth before looping back around to its elongated orbit.

https://twitter.com/NASA_SLS/status/1547219517952122881

Offline Steve G

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #311 on: 07/13/2022 09:09 pm »
Don't you miss the good old days when it took three days to get to the moon?

Offline trimeta

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #312 on: 07/14/2022 03:04 am »
Don't you miss the good old days when it took three days to get to the moon?

Hey, you get what you pay for. And that's a good thing -- having multiple price points to the Moon is better than just the expensive-but-fast option.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #313 on: 07/26/2022 06:18 am »
https://twitter.com/peter_j_beck/status/1551764066019946496

Quote
22 days ago we launched Lunar Photon on a mission to the Moon. Primary mission completed, Lunar Photon is 1.1 million km from Earth and still transmitting.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #314 on: 07/26/2022 06:44 am »
https://twitter.com/peter_j_beck/status/1551764066019946496

Quote
22 days ago we launched Lunar Photon on a mission to the Moon. Primary mission completed, Lunar Photon is 1.1 million km from Earth and still transmitting.
This is using same commercial ground stations they use for LEO missions. Listen to this interview for more info.  Peter also talked about Hypercurie ISP, hit 320 but it wasn't clear if this was designed sustained ISP, sounds like might be closer to 310. Still very respectful for such a small engine using storage propellants.


« Last Edit: 07/26/2022 06:50 am by zubenelgenubi »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #315 on: 07/27/2022 08:04 pm »
https://advancedspace.com/capstone-tcm2-success/

Quote
Another Success with CAPSTONE Lunar Mission
Jul 27, 2022 | CAPSTONE Mission

Spacecraft remains on target to test navigation technology and lunar operations to support NASA’s Moon missions under Artemis programs

It is hard to believe we launched CAPSTONE almost a month ago. We have encountered many variables that have kept this mission exciting, and the mission operators have been active. The Advanced Space Astrodynamics and Navigation Engineers have been busy for years leading up to this and just as busy this last month as CAPSTONE flies. An assumption may be that a small satellite means less work but in actuality the effort is just as great if not more so. Small satellites with small budgets and size restrictions require more creativity and calculated steps to ensure precision and execution through the process.

Monday’s trajectory correction maneuver (TCM) was conducted in two stages to allow the navigation software to recalibrate in order to make the full burn more accurate. The first portion of the maneuver lasted 11 minutes and the following portion was 15 minutes. This TCM performed a small accommodation to align the outbound trajectory from launch to the inbound trajectory to the near rectilinear halo orbit (NRHO), the intended orbit for the Gateway.

“Our team has been showcasing unique expertise and improving our tools and knowledge since the beginning of the CAPSTONE mission 2.5 years ago. Each stage of the mission validates these capabilities and demonstrates the ability of our team to optimize and support operations in challenging environments such as cislunar space,” said Bradley Cheetham, Advanced Space chief executive officer and CAPSTONE principal investigator. “Our team is driven, resilient, and dedicated to supporting the sustainable exploration, development, and settlement of space through all phases of the mission and in the face of challenges and adversity.”

State-of-the-art technology will be used by the small satellite beyond low earth orbit to navigate the spacecraft. Once at the NRHO, CAPSTONE will demonstrate the peer-to-peer navigational technology advancement of the Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System (CAPS) developed by Advanced Space. This system will revolutionize the future of spacecraft navigation. Not only will the dependency of Earth communications systems to determine the location of the spacecraft be reduced but mission costs from utilizing those systems will also become reduced.

This week’s maneuver confirmed the microwave-size spacecraft remains on its ballistic lunar transfer (BLT) to the Moon. The Advanced Space team continues to conduct flight dynamics analyses, orchestrate their designed maneuvers, and maintain spacecraft navigation with the Terran Orbital team commanding spacecraft activities. Operations includes exchanging data with NASA’s Deep Space Network and working with component builders – Stellar Exploration for propulsion and Space Dynamics Laboratory for the radio system.

At the completion of the TCM, CAPSTONE was 1,250,796 km from Earth and moving at 595 mph (267 m/s). CAPSTONE is still scheduled to reach the target NRHO in four months on November 13th.
« Last Edit: 07/27/2022 08:04 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #316 on: 07/28/2022 12:57 am »
NASA’s CAPSTONE Executes Third Maneuver on Track to the Moon

Gianine Figliozzi Posted on July 27, 2022 4:19 pm

NASA’s Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System Technology Operations and Navigation Experiment (CAPSTONE) successfully completed its third trajectory correction maneuver (TCM) on Monday. CAPSTONE is taking a long but fuel-efficient route to the Moon, flying about 958,000 miles (1.54 million kilometers) from Earth before looping back around to its near rectilinear halo orbit (NRHO).

 At the completion of the maneuver, CAPSTONE was about 780,000 miles (1.25 million kilometers) from Earth and was moving at about 595 miles per hour (about 267 meters per second). CAPSTONE will perform several such maneuvers during its journey to lunar orbit to refine its trajectory to the Moon.

CAPSTONE remains on track to arrive to its lunar orbit on Nov. 13.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/artemis/2022/07/27/nasas-capstone-executes-third-maneuver-on-track-to-the-moon/

Offline Phil Stooke

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #317 on: 08/08/2022 09:03 pm »
https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1556729197585842176

Lunar Photon doing a swingby of Earth later this month.  It may do something cool... but what?  My vote is for a lunar impact on the way back out again (by far the best way to remove hazards from cis-lunar space)

Offline trimeta

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Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #318 on: 08/08/2022 09:16 pm »
https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1556729197585842176

Lunar Photon doing a swingby of Earth later this month.  It may do something cool... but what?  My vote is for a lunar impact on the way back out again (by far the best way to remove hazards from cis-lunar space)

My vote is swinging out to heliocentric, to test the comms and other systems in deep space prior to the 2023 Venus mission. But they may not have the propellant margin for that.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Electron : CAPSTONE : LC-1 : 28 June 2022 (09:55 UTC)
« Reply #319 on: 08/08/2022 09:48 pm »
https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1556729197585842176

Lunar Photon doing a swingby of Earth later this month.  It may do something cool... but what?  My vote is for a lunar impact on the way back out again (by far the best way to remove hazards from cis-lunar space)
While does remove space debris it now creates lunar debris, best to dispose of it into deep space or earth atmosphere.
« Last Edit: 08/08/2022 10:01 pm by zubenelgenubi »

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