Author Topic: Comparing Astra and Rocket Lab business models  (Read 13687 times)

Offline M.E.T.

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Re: Comparing Astra and Rocket Lab business models
« Reply #40 on: 05/19/2022 03:18 am »
Although Astraís mass-expendable concept also would work well for munitions. A micro-ICBM for Global strike (non-nuclear) for less cost than a Tomahawk cruise missile. (Note they havenít actually achieved the $100,000 or whatever price point they had been hoping for a while ago.)
Careful, it'd be hard to distinguish between nuclear and non-nuclear ones. Similar to how the Navy does NOT want nuclear missiless on their ships - enemy would then treat all ships as nuclear ones.
I'm not advocating for it. It's one of the reasons I'm not hugely in favor of the mass-expendable approach.

I thought liquid fuelled ICBMís lack strategic value due to the slower response times necessitated by the fuelling process?
« Last Edit: 05/19/2022 03:22 am by M.E.T. »

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Comparing Astra and Rocket Lab business models
« Reply #41 on: 05/19/2022 03:37 am »
You need to take this discussion elsewhere, most like different forum.

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Online Zed_Noir

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Re: Comparing Astra and Rocket Lab business models
« Reply #42 on: 05/19/2022 03:50 am »
Although Astraís mass-expendable concept also would work well for munitions. A micro-ICBM for Global strike (non-nuclear) for less cost than a Tomahawk cruise missile. (Note they havenít actually achieved the $100,000 or whatever price point they had been hoping for a while ago.)
Careful, it'd be hard to distinguish between nuclear and non-nuclear ones. Similar to how the Navy does NOT want nuclear missiless on their ships - enemy would then treat all ships as nuclear ones.
I'm not advocating for it. It's one of the reasons I'm not hugely in favor of the mass-expendable approach.

I thought liquid fuelled ICBMís lack strategic value due to the slower response times necessitated by the fuelling process?
I agree with @Robotbeat. If someone deploys micro-ICBMs, someone will either use them or someone else will try to preempt them. Better if no one deploy them in the first place.



Offline PM3

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Re: Comparing Astra and Rocket Lab business models
« Reply #43 on: 08/08/2022 10:56 am »
The business model as described in post #1 has failed.

Quote from: Eric Berger
The idea was simple. If Astra's small satellite customers would accept a bit of risk, the launch company could cut down on its testing, analysis, and redundancy in design. In turn, Astra would pass those launch savings along to customers.
...
The most recent failure appears to have catalyzed Astra to move in a new direction. In short, Astra will shift away from its previous mantra of being lean in terms of staffing, moving at breakneck speed, and being willing to tolerate failure in launch vehicles.
https://arstechnica.com/science/2022/08/as-losses-mount-astra-announces-a-radical-pivot-to-a-larger-launch-vehicle/

Quote from: Astra
Astra announces that after two of its four Rocket 3.3 flights were successful, the Company will transition to the next version of its launch system and is working with customers to re-manifest all payloads onto the new launch system, designed for higher capacity, reliability, and production rate.
...
Updated, streamlined plan to invest in delivering higher reliability, higher capacity 600kg Launch System 2.0 to market.
https://investor.astra.com/news-releases/news-release-details/astra-announces-second-quarter-2022-financial-results
"Never, never be afraid of the truth." -- Jim Bridenstine

Offline trimeta

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Re: Comparing Astra and Rocket Lab business models
« Reply #44 on: 08/08/2022 02:51 pm »
Events since the opening of this thread also show the power of Rocket Lab's broader business strategy of becoming an end-to-end space solutions provider, in particular selling spacecraft components (which is already a bigger part of their bottom line than selling launches). Astra has also talked about similar plans, but their efforts with the acquisition of Apollo Fusion seem to have been less successful so far.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Comparing Astra and Rocket Lab business models
« Reply #45 on: 08/08/2022 05:40 pm »
Events since the opening of this thread also show the power of Rocket Lab's broader business strategy of becoming an end-to-end space solutions provider, in particular selling spacecraft components (which is already a bigger part of their bottom line than selling launches). Astra has also talked about similar plans, but their efforts with the acquisition of Apollo Fusion seem to have been less successful so far.
The revenue stream from Apollo isn't likely to do much to stem cashburn for LV side of business.
« Last Edit: 08/08/2022 09:52 pm by zubenelgenubi »

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