Author Topic: Atlas V N22 - Starliner CFT (Crewed) - Canaveral SLC-41 - NET April 2023  (Read 52232 times)

Offline russianhalo117

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Well, let's see what the post-flight analysis for OFT-2 concludes and when CFT will fly!
Since the launch of the JPSS-2 has been postponed to November, and the ULA is investigating launch windows for the first launch of the Vulcan rocket this year (either September or October), I think that NASA and the ULA might target December for the launch of the CFT mission to so that they have enough time to progress with and eventually conclude the post-flight analysis for the OFT-2 launch.
You repeat this question often. These two missions are on different ranges and so do not conflict nor interfere in these regards. Boeing and NASA are in charge of CFT and only when a firm launch date is set do they tell ULA this firm date there plans per the standard ULA mission campaign schedule. Outside of that ULA receives NASA planning schedule updates to target Atlas V shipment to the Atlas Operations Center at CCSFS to enter storage and then processing for paunch upon the firm target date. Deconflicting in this case only applies to the range schedule for CCSFS and the ISS MCB's VV schedule for ISS traffic control.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1537508014105698307

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NASA names its two-person crew for Boeing's Starliner crew test flight: Commander Barry “Butch” Wilmore and pilot Suni Williams. NASA expects to set a target for the CFT mission launch date in July.

Offline Targeteer

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The full NASA release.  Why drop Fincke and why bring up Epps?

June 16, 2022
RELEASE 22-061
NASA Updates Astronaut Assignments for Boeing Starliner Test Flight


NASA will fly two astronaut test pilots aboard the agency’s Boeing Crew Flight Test (CFT) mission to the International Space Station, where they will live and work off the Earth for about two weeks.

CFT commander Barry “Butch” Wilmore, whom NASA assigned to the prime crew in October 2020, will join NASA astronaut Suni Williams, who will serve as pilot. Williams previously served as the backup test pilot for CFT while assigned as commander of NASA’s Boeing Starliner-1 mission, Starliner’s first post-certification mission. As CFT pilot, Williams takes the place of NASA astronaut Nicole Mann, originally assigned to the mission in 2018. NASA reassigned Mann to the agency’s SpaceX Crew-5 mission in 2021.

Based upon current space station resources and scheduling needs, a short duration mission with two astronaut test pilots is sufficient to meet all NASA and Boeing test objectives for CFT, which include demonstrating Starliner’s ability to safely fly operational crewed missions to and from the space station. To protect against unforeseen events with crew transportation to the station, NASA may extend the CFT docked duration up to six months and add an additional astronaut later, if needed.

NASA astronaut Mike Fincke, whom the agency previously assigned as the Joint Operations Commander for CFT, will now train as the backup spacecraft test pilot and remains eligible for assignment to a future mission. Fincke’s unique expertise will continue to benefit the team as he retains his position as flight test lead, filling a vital role in Starliner certification.

"Mike Fincke has dedicated the last nine years of his career to these first Boeing missions and Suni the last seven. Butch has done a marvelous job leading the team as the spacecraft commander since 2020,” said Reid Wiseman, chief, Astronaut Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. “It was great to see Starliner’s successful journey to the International Space Station during the Orbital Flight Test-2 (OFT-2) mission last month. We are all looking forward to cheering on Butch and Suni as they fly the first crewed Starliner mission."

Wilmore, Williams, and Fincke each have flown previously as long-duration crew members aboard the space station.

NASA astronaut Jeanette Epps continues to prepare for an upcoming long duration mission aboard Starliner-1. NASA also has identified backup flight opportunities for Epps on the SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft for additional scheduling and resource flexibility. Epps has begun cross-training on the SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft to prepare for this possibility.

Meanwhile, NASA and Boeing are continuing to conduct OFT-2 data reviews while assessing future CFT launch opportunities. Following successful completion of the uncrewed OFT-2 mission, the Starliner crew module has returned to Boeing’s Commercial Crew and Cargo Processing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where it will undergo system checkouts and vehicle inspections. The Starliner team is in the process of delivering the initial test flight data to NASA and jointly determining forward work ahead of a crewed flight. These engineering and program reviews are expected to continue for several weeks, culminating in a launch schedule assessment at the end of July, based upon spacecraft readiness, space station scheduling needs, and Eastern Range availability.

“Starliner and the Atlas V performed well during all phases of OFT-2, and now we are taking a methodical look at each system to determine what needs to be upgraded or improved ahead of CFT, just as we do with every other crewed flight,” said Steve Stich, manager, NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. “Additionally, Butch, Suni, and Mike have been instrumental in the development of Starliner on the path to having a second space station crew transportation system.”

For the crewed flight test, Boeing’s Starliner will launch aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.

Following a successful CFT mission, NASA will begin the final process of certifying the Starliner spacecraft and systems for crew missions to the space station. Regular, long-duration commercial crew rotation missions enable NASA to continue the important research and technology investigations taking place aboard the orbiting laboratory. Such research benefits people on Earth and lays the groundwork for future exploration of the Moon and Mars, starting with the agency’s Artemis missions, which include landing the first woman and first person of color on the lunar surface.

Find out more about NASA’s Commercial Crew Program at:

https://www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline ZachS09

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I knew NASA would decide to have a crew of two on CFT. It’s sufficient enough to carry out the planned CFT objectives.

Like I said before, it originally was three astronauts because Boeing wanted to fly a test pilot of their own (Chris Ferguson).

Although I wonder why demote Suni Williams to pilot from spacecraft commander.
Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

Offline AstroWare

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I knew NASA would decide to have a crew of two on CFT. It’s sufficient enough to carry out the planned CFT objectives.

Like I said before, it originally was three astronauts because Boeing wanted to fly a test pilot of their own (Chris Ferguson).

Although I wonder why demote Suni Williams to pilot from spacecraft commander.
Doesn't look like she was demoted to me. She was the backup pilot for CFT.

Now she is the pilot.

That's why we have backups after all.

Sure, she was planning to command the first operational mission, but i don't see that as a demotion. I'm sure she will fly and likely command others. To some, flying on the first flight may be more exciting than even commanding the operational mission !

Does anyone (not on the forums) know who commanded Crew-1? More people remember Bob and Doug!

Offline Robert_the_Doll

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I knew NASA would decide to have a crew of two on CFT. It’s sufficient enough to carry out the planned CFT objectives.

Like I said before, it originally was three astronauts because Boeing wanted to fly a test pilot of their own (Chris Ferguson).

Although I wonder why demote Suni Williams to pilot from spacecraft commander.

It might have to do with the change from having CFT no longer being required to stay for months to fill in a shortfall gap. It may have to again at some point, but that is currently unlikely.

Offline ZachS09

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I knew NASA would decide to have a crew of two on CFT. It’s sufficient enough to carry out the planned CFT objectives.

Like I said before, it originally was three astronauts because Boeing wanted to fly a test pilot of their own (Chris Ferguson).

Although I wonder why demote Suni Williams to pilot from spacecraft commander.
Doesn't look like she was demoted to me. She was the backup pilot for CFT.

Now she is the pilot.

That's why we have backups after all.

Sure, she was planning to command the first operational mission, but i don't see that as a demotion. I'm sure she will fly and likely command others. To some, flying on the first flight may be more exciting than even commanding the operational mission !

Does anyone (not on the forums) know who commanded Crew-1? More people remember Bob and Doug!

SpaceX Crew-1 was commanded by Mike Hopkins, who previously flew on a Soyuz.
Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

Offline AstroWare

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Does anyone (not on the forums) know who commanded Crew-1? More people remember Bob and Doug!

SpaceX Crew-1 was commanded by Mike Hopkins, who previously flew on a Soyuz.

That was obviously a rhetorical question...


Offline ZachS09

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Does anyone (not on the forums) know who commanded Crew-1? More people remember Bob and Doug!

SpaceX Crew-1 was commanded by Mike Hopkins, who previously flew on a Soyuz.

That was obviously a rhetorical question...

Darn it. I’m so imbecilic.
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Offline JSz

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As for the Crew Dragon's first manned flight, the DM-2 (the equivalent of the planned CFT), there was not one commander but two, with split responsibilities.

Offline John_Marshall

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It might have to do with the change from having CFT no longer being required to stay for months to fill in a shortfall gap. It may have to again at some point, but that is currently unlikely.

I presume she got demoted from commander to pilot because of whatever led Mike Fincke to be moved from the prime crew to the backup crew.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Cross-post:

https://arstechnica.com/science/2022/07/yes-boeings-starliner-spacecraft-really-could-fly-astronauts-this-year/

Quote
Yes, Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft really could fly astronauts this year
Early data reviews of Starliner's first flight look good.

by Eric Berger - Jul 1, 2022 3:34pm GMT

Five weeks have passed since Boeing's Starliner spacecraft returned from a largely successful test flight to the International Space Station, and the company continues to review data from the mission alongside engineers from NASA.

So far, there have been no showstoppers. In fact, sources say, the relatively clean performance of Starliner has increased the possibility that the vehicle could make its first crewed flight this year in December.

Online Vahe231991

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Cross-post:

https://arstechnica.com/science/2022/07/yes-boeings-starliner-spacecraft-really-could-fly-astronauts-this-year/

Quote
Yes, Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft really could fly astronauts this year
Early data reviews of Starliner's first flight look good.

by Eric Berger - Jul 1, 2022 3:34pm GMT

Five weeks have passed since Boeing's Starliner spacecraft returned from a largely successful test flight to the International Space Station, and the company continues to review data from the mission alongside engineers from NASA.

So far, there have been no showstoppers. In fact, sources say, the relatively clean performance of Starliner has increased the possibility that the vehicle could make its first crewed flight this year in December.
The article has the following on the probable launch date for the CFT mission:
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Based on NASA's internal schedules, however, it appears the agency may opt for a shorter six-day trip. On a revised schedule this week, the Starliner test flight showed a December 8 launch date, with a subsequent docking at the space station from December 9 to December 14.

Just as I have suspected, the launch of the CFT is looking more and more likely to take place at the end of this year.

Online Zed_Noir

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It might have to do with the change from having CFT no longer being required to stay for months to fill in a shortfall gap. It may have to again at some point, but that is currently unlikely.

I presume she got demoted from commander to pilot because of whatever led Mike Fincke to be moved from the prime crew to the backup crew.
NASA wanted 2 test pilots aboard the short first crew Starliner flight. From Eric Berger's Ars Technica article.
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Two weeks ago, NASA publicly announced that veteran astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams would serve as the prime crew for this test flight. NASA also said a short-duration mission with two astronaut test pilots is sufficient to meet all of the test objectives for the flight test. However, the agency added, this mission could be extended or shortened based on the staffing needs of the station. For example, NASA said it might even add an astronaut and extend the mission if the need arose.

Online Vahe231991

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In case anyone's aware, the CFT will be the first manned mission to be launched atop the Atlas V since the Faith 7 mission in May 1963. As pointed out elsewhere in this forum, since the Atlas V will launch all operational manned Starliner missions, it is intended to carry out the last manned launches involving an SLV that carries the name of a Cold War ICBM, since the Gemini missions were launched atop the Titan ICBM.
« Last Edit: 07/03/2022 11:45 pm by Vahe231991 »

Offline Jim

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In case anyone's aware, the CFT will be the first manned mission to be launched atop the Atlas V since the Gemini 12 mission in November 1966. As pointed out elsewhere in this forum, since the Atlas V will launch all operational manned Starliner missions, it will be the only operational American SLV optimized for manned launches that carries the name of a Cold War ICBM.

No.  Gemini used a Titan II.   
And, one would not say Atlas V is optimized for crew launches.
lastly, Atlas V carried over the name mostly because of Atlas Centaur.  Atlas V has only propellants in common with the ICBM Atlas.

Offline Skyrocket

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In case anyone's aware, the CFT will be the first manned mission to be launched atop the Atlas V since the Faith 7 mission in May 1963. As pointed out elsewhere in this forum, since the Atlas V will launch all operational manned Starliner missions, it is intended to carry out the last manned launches involving an SLV that carries the name of a Cold War ICBM, since the Gemini missions were launched atop the Titan ICBM.
There were never any crewed launches of Atlas V.
And Atlas V is hardly related to the the Atlas-D which launched the Mercury capsules except by name.

Online DanClemmensen

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In case anyone's aware, the CFT will be the first manned mission to be launched atop the Atlas V since the Faith 7 mission in May 1963. As pointed out elsewhere in this forum, since the Atlas V will launch all operational manned Starliner missions, it is intended to carry out the last manned launches involving an SLV that carries the name of a Cold War ICBM, since the Gemini missions were launched atop the Titan ICBM.
(My bold) Anyone who has concluded this must think that Starliner-6 will be the last Starliner flight, that there will never be a Starliner flight except the CFT and the six operational CCP missions. So no non-NASA flights and no flights except to ISS. This is not yet known.

Offline Redclaws

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In case anyone's aware, the CFT will be the first manned mission to be launched atop the Atlas V since the Faith 7 mission in May 1963. As pointed out elsewhere in this forum, since the Atlas V will launch all operational manned Starliner missions, it is intended to carry out the last manned launches involving an SLV that carries the name of a Cold War ICBM, since the Gemini missions were launched atop the Titan ICBM.
There were never any crewed launches of Atlas V.
And Atlas V is hardly related to the the Atlas-D which launched the Mercury capsules except by name.

“Carries the name of”, so

Online Vahe231991

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In case anyone's aware, the CFT will be the first manned mission to be launched atop the Atlas V since the Faith 7 mission in May 1963. As pointed out elsewhere in this forum, since the Atlas V will launch all operational manned Starliner missions, it is intended to carry out the last manned launches involving an SLV that carries the name of a Cold War ICBM, since the Gemini missions were launched atop the Titan ICBM.
There were never any crewed launches of Atlas V.
And Atlas V is hardly related to the the Atlas-D which launched the Mercury capsules except by name.
I wanted to emphasize that the CFT will be the first manned mission to be launched atop an SLV bearing the Atlas name since 1963, given the Atlas V was designed from the outset to launch only unmanned spacecraft. And yes, the Atlas V is unrelated to the Atlas ICBM used for orbital Mercury missions and was designed as a replacement for the Atlas II (the Atlas III also used a brand-new first stage in sharp contrast to the Atlas II, but had a short operational career, with just six launches performed) under the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle program.

Tags: cft Atlas V starliner 
 

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