Author Topic: LauncherOne - Toowoomba - 2024  (Read 1407 times)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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LauncherOne - Toowoomba - 2024
« on: 09/21/2022 04:38 am »
Virgin Orbit is heading to Australia!

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/launch/5617-toowoomba-to-host-virgin-orbit-launch-site

"Toowoomba to host Virgin Orbit launch site
Liam McAneny
20 September 2022

Australia will become the third country to host a Virgin Orbit launch site and spaceport after the company announced its plans to launch from Toowoomba Airport in 2024."

Toowoomba is located on the east coast of Australia, at 2734′S 15157′E.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toowoomba

See also the Virgin Orbit press release at

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=51745.msg2410038#msg2410038
« Last Edit: 09/21/2022 04:44 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Welsh Dragon

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Re: LauncherOne - Toowoomba - 2024
« Reply #1 on: 09/21/2022 07:05 am »
I guess their business strategy is to have governments pay them for the bragging rights of having a launch "from their territory". Even though it'll be out in international waters, and there is absolutely no reason to launch from the UK or Australia. It's really quite a clever business model from Virgin in the short term, but I don't see how that'll work long term.

Offline edzieba

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Re: LauncherOne - Toowoomba - 2024
« Reply #2 on: 09/21/2022 09:36 am »
I guess their business strategy is to have governments pay them for the bragging rights of having a launch "from their territory". Even though it'll be out in international waters, and there is absolutely no reason to launch from the UK or Australia. It's really quite a clever business model from Virgin in the short term, but I don't see how that'll work long term.
It's not so much about launching "from their territory", but more that their hardware does not need to be shipped to or launched from anyone else's territory (and thus are not directly beholden to their particular laws).

Online trimeta

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Re: LauncherOne - Toowoomba - 2024
« Reply #3 on: 09/21/2022 02:09 pm »
I guess their business strategy is to have governments pay them for the bragging rights of having a launch "from their territory". Even though it'll be out in international waters, and there is absolutely no reason to launch from the UK or Australia. It's really quite a clever business model from Virgin in the short term, but I don't see how that'll work long term.
It's not so much about launching "from their territory", but more that their hardware does not need to be shipped to or launched from anyone else's territory (and thus are not directly beholden to their particular laws).
Since Virgin Orbit is legally a US-based launch provider, aren't their payloads still subject to US law when launching from other countries? Same as how Rocket Lab launches are subject to US law, not (just) New Zealand.

Offline CameronD

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Re: LauncherOne - Toowoomba - 2024
« Reply #4 on: 09/26/2022 03:36 am »
Since Virgin Orbit is legally a US-based launch provider, aren't their payloads still subject to US law when launching from other countries? Same as how Rocket Lab launches are subject to US law, not (just) New Zealand.

Well.. they'll need to get a Launch Permit from the Australian Space Agency for starters.  That permit would most likely encompass all they need to do under existing agreements between the US and Australia and could take anything from 2 months to 2 years to get.

Second, they'll need to find a payload to launch.  Since there's currently no market for launching anything from the middle of Australia (meaning a several-hour flight north or south to get to an appropriate launch area), it'll be most interesting to see what they start with.
 
« Last Edit: 09/26/2022 03:37 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

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