Author Topic: NASA ISS Commercialization  (Read 35308 times)

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #60 on: 06/22/2020 05:07 pm »
https://twitter.com/jimbridenstine/status/1275111069846028290

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One year ago @NASA announced the @Space_Station is open for business. Learn about the progress we've made in the last year, including agreements with @Axiom_Space and @virgingalactic to enable private astronaut missions ➡️ nasa.gov/press-release/…

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June 22, 2020

NASA Moving Forward to Enable a Low-Earth Orbit Economy

One year ago, NASA announced the agency is opening the space station for business, enabling commercial and marketing opportunities on the station, and the agency has moved forward toward its ultimate goal in low-Earth orbit to partner with industry to achieve a strong ecosystem in which NASA is one of many customers purchasing services and capabilities at lower cost. Providing expanded opportunities at the International Space Station to manufacture, market and promote commercial products and services will help catalyze and expand space exploration markets for many businesses.

The new policy includes activities that can be as simple as a product pictured in space for use in marketing materials or a company flying and returning commemorative or other items to be sold after having been in space. NASA crew members on the station also can support these activities behind the scenes. The key is that the activity must require the unique microgravity environment, have a nexus to the NASA mission, or support the development of a sustainable low-Earth orbit economy.

U.S. entities can continue to submit proposals for such activities. NASA has received five proposals so far for commercial and marketing opportunities on the station, and the first of those agreements is already now at the station, launched on the SpaceX CRS-20 mission. The agency has two signed Reimbursable Space Act Agreements (RSAA), is processing two, and is evaluating one more. NASA is making available annually 90 hours of crew time and 175 kg of cargo launch capability but will limit the amount provided to any one company.

NASA also enabled private astronaut missions to the station, ensuring the ability to accommodate two missions each year at the space station of up to 30 days duration. The agency has an agreement in place with KBR to train private astronauts using NASA facilities. NASA has an agreement with Axiom Space for developing plans to enable private astronaut missions to the space station. In addition, the agency signed an agreement with Virgin Galactic as it develops a program to identify candidates interested in purchasing private astronaut missions to the station then procures the transportation, on-orbit resources, and ground resources for private astronaut missions.

Axiom Space and SpaceX made a separate agreement for a future private astronaut mission to the station. And SpaceX also announced an agreement for another private astronaut mission not to the space station, an example of NASA enabling a broader market in space. Axiom’s partnership with SpaceX for a private astronaut mission and Virgin Galactic’s plans to develop a new private orbital astronaut readiness program directly support NASA’s broad strategy to facilitate the commercialization of low-Earth orbit by U.S. entities.

NASA awarded a contract to Axiom Space to provide at least one habitable commercial module to be attached to the International Space Station. NASA also intends to support development of free-flying commercial destinations with release of a solicitation soon.

These companies are willing to make these commitments because they can see the long-term potential to sell services to both the U.S. government and to private citizens. They are putting their private capital at risk in these developments for future profit, whether from the U.S. government flying astronauts, or other missions for private astronauts.

NASA also is providing seed money for seven proposals to enable enterprising companies to mature their concepts and stimulate scalable demand for existing and future platforms in space. One example is the work LambdaVision is doing to produce protein-based artificial retinas in space that would be returned to Earth for surgical implant to restore sight for patients suffering from degenerative retinal diseases.

At release, NASA provided a forecast of its minimum long-term, low-Earth orbit requirements, representing the type and amount of services that NASA intends to purchase when those services become commercially available.

Creating a robust economy in low-Earth orbit will be dependent on bringing many new companies and people into that economy, and will require the development of not only the supply of services but also the demand for those capabilities. We are continuing to see new entrants enabled by the new commercial use policy, and via research and development being conducted through the ISS National Laboratory. NASA continues to work with industry to reduce areas of uncertainty regarding the future of these commercial activities.

NASA’s goal is to achieve a robust economy in low-Earth orbit from which the agency can purchase services as one of many customers. A robust commercial space economy ensures national interests for research and development in low-Earth orbit are fulfilled while allowing NASA to focus government resources on deep space exploration through the Artemis program and land the first woman and next man on the surface of the Moon in 2024.
Last Updated: June 22, 2020
Editor: Michael Johnson

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-moving-forward-to-enable-a-low-earth-orbit-economy

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #61 on: 06/25/2020 12:59 pm »
Not just NASA pursuing increased commercialization:

https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1276136254267183104

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Roscosmos says two space tourists will fly to the ISS on a Soyuz in 2023.

twitter.com/roscosmos/status/1276135934204002305

Google translate:

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Between RKK #Энергия and company #SpaceAdventures a contract was signed for a short-term expedition of two space flight participants to the ISS - roscosmos.ru/28730/

🚀 The launch on the Soyuz MS ship will take place in 2023

Online yg1968

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #62 on: 08/27/2020 03:37 pm »
Quote from: Marcia Smith
Hart: working on enabling LEO commercialization per Appendix I and J.
Won't be moving forward on Appendix K for now.

https://twitter.com/SpcPlcyOnline/status/1299005739877445634

Online yg1968

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #63 on: 08/27/2020 03:39 pm »
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Hart: private astronaut missions (PAMs).  Have Space Act Agreements in place already.  2 mission specific proposals under evaluation today. Can't go into details but very exciting. Looking at 2 short duration missions/year, 10-30 day missions.

https://twitter.com/SpcPlcyOnline/status/1299006546249211905

Online yg1968

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #64 on: 08/31/2020 02:08 am »
For the free flyer, it seems that a new sollicitation will be issued:

Quote from: Space News
“We definitely want to do a free-flyer acquisition,” said Phil McAlister, director of commercial spaceflight programs at NASA, in the same panel. “I can’t promise any specific timelines associated with that, but we are definitely working on the free flyer and intend to release a solicitation soon on that once we get our strategy all agreed to internally.”

https://spacenews.com/nasa-puts-solicitation-for-commercial-free-flyer-station-on-hold/

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #65 on: 09/08/2020 01:01 pm »
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Gerstenmaier warns against ending space station program prematurely
by Jeff Foust — September 8, 2020

WASHINGTON — The former head of NASA’s human spaceflight program, now working as a consultant to SpaceX, said he welcomes greater commercial activity in low Earth orbit but cautioned against ending the International Space Station prematurely.

https://spacenews.com/gerstenmaier-warns-against-ending-space-station-program-prematurely/

Online yg1968

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #66 on: 11/10/2020 08:37 pm »
Quote from: NASA OIG
OIG announces review of NASA’s Commercialization of Low Earth Orbit.

https://twitter.com/NASAOIG/status/1326276477218775041

Online yg1968

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #67 on: 11/11/2020 10:33 pm »
Quote from: Axiom Space
A multinational crew composed of three private astronauts and @CommanderMLA have now officially signed with Axiom. In other words: the first private crew to go to orbit in human history – the crew of Ax-1 – has been assembled. Mission launches NET late 2021. More details soon.

Quote from: Michael Lopez-Alegria
I’m so grateful for this opportunity; we’re going to have a #Blast!

https://twitter.com/CommanderMLA/status/1326631425605578757
« Last Edit: 11/11/2020 11:02 pm by yg1968 »

Online yg1968

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #68 on: 01/14/2021 02:11 pm »
Concerning the free flyer station in LEO, Phil McAlister had this to say about it, at yesterday's NAC HEO meeting:

https://twitter.com/genejm29/status/1349419793082970125

https://twitter.com/genejm29/status/1349421001331847170
« Last Edit: 01/14/2021 02:22 pm by yg1968 »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #69 on: 01/14/2021 06:37 pm »
The 'HEO Commercial Spaceflight Development' presentation and the other presentations from the 13 & 14 Januari 21 (HEO) Human Exploration and Operations Committee virtual meeting can be found on:
https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/heo/nac-heoc

Online yg1968

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #70 on: 03/05/2021 12:48 am »
« Last Edit: 03/05/2021 12:51 am by yg1968 »

Offline Tomness

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #71 on: 03/05/2021 03:49 am »
NASA hikes prices for commercial ISS users:
https://spacenews.com/nasa-hikes-prices-for-commercial-iss-users/

Updated pricing policy:
https://www.nasa.gov/leo-economy/commercial-use/pricing-policy

Sounds like a nice time polishing off that old Dragon Lab/ Cygnus Lab and commerical free flyer station.

Offline eeergo

Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #72 on: 03/05/2021 01:56 pm »
NASA hikes prices for commercial ISS users:
https://spacenews.com/nasa-hikes-prices-for-commercial-iss-users/

Updated pricing policy:
https://www.nasa.gov/leo-economy/commercial-use/pricing-policy

Sounds like a nice time polishing off that old Dragon Lab/ Cygnus Lab and commerical free flyer station.

I wonder how much the aforementioned systems have to do with the hike...
-DaviD-

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #73 on: 03/23/2021 04:19 pm »
https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1374409475616960523

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NASA has posted the slides for its industry briefing later today on commercial LEO destinations. Key takeaway: they now plan to award several funded Space Act Agreements for initial concept studies, then purchase “destination services” when available.
https://procurement.jsc.nasa.gov/CLD/

Online yg1968

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #74 on: 03/23/2021 05:20 pm »
This seems to be related to what was previously called Nextstep, Appendix K, the Free Flyer. I believe that it replaces it.
« Last Edit: 03/23/2021 05:28 pm by yg1968 »

Online yg1968

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Online yg1968

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« Last Edit: 03/24/2021 11:21 pm by yg1968 »

Online TrevorMonty

Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #77 on: 03/24/2021 04:57 pm »
NASA forecast of having 2 astronauts permanently on commercial station may sound like downsize from current 3-4. In fact its not from research point of view. Current ISS crew spent large part of their time maintaining ISS, on commercial station it will be owner's crew responsibility. 

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Offline ncb1397

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #78 on: 03/24/2021 05:07 pm »
NASA forecast of having 2 astronauts permanently on commercial station may sound like downsize from current 3-4. In fact its not from research point of view. Current ISS crew spent large part of their time maintaining ISS, on commercial station it will be owner's crew responsibility. 

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Possibly not. If something breaks on Crew Dragon during Inspiration 4 flight, there are no SpaceX employees to fix it. If there are no Axiom (or whatever company it turns out to be) employees or contractors on board, it is going to fall on the NASA astronauts to resolve. Same goes for any of the regular commercial crew flights that are not flying SpaceX/Boeing astronauts. So, the arrangement is likely pretty fluid. NASA would have no issues performing maintenance tasks. Part of the point though is sharing this station with other passengers. If the crew vehicles have capacity for 4, you don't want to crowd out the market and buy every seat. This defacto puts open unfilled seats onto the open market.
« Last Edit: 03/24/2021 07:59 pm by ncb1397 »

Offline gemmy0I

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Re: NASA ISS Commercialization
« Reply #79 on: 03/24/2021 07:56 pm »
NASA forecast of having 2 astronauts permanently on commercial station may sound like downsize from current 3-4. In fact its not from research point of view. Current ISS crew spent large part of their time maintaining ISS, on commercial station it will be owner's crew responsibility. 
This is quite interesting as it relates to Axiom's hiring of two full-time professional astronauts (Lopez-Alegria and Whitson) already, with (for all we know) more such announcements coming down the pike. Given Axiom's extensive experience and connections with ISS program management, they are presumably very aware of NASA's thought process on how it would like task responsibilities to work on private stations in the future, and their staffing decisions reflect that.

It certainly makes sense for maintenance on a private station to be primarily the responsibility of a full-time private crew rather than visiting tenants. Otherwise there would be little difference in practice between the operating model of a government space station vs. a private space station with government anchor tenants. It would, in effect, be a government station (albeit with a few private "side tenants") built through private contracts - more or less what the ISS is (or is becoming) already. Since the whole point of shifting to private stations is to allow private companies to innovate and compete on operational efficiency and costs, it stands to reason they should bear the costs of those operational responsibilities independently of the "end-to-end" service presented to tenants.

Especially early on, the lines will have to blur a bit; during the initial build-out and setup of a private station, there will be limited facilities to support large crews, necessitating some "wearing of multiple hats" if NASA wants to provide any share of the crew in those early days. But NASA's goal of 2 astronauts makes clear that they are pushing for a cleaner division of labor long-term.

I do suspect that this "2 astronaut" goal is just a baseline starting point for NASA. It represents a continuation but not an increase of the capabilities currently offered by ISS. But if private stations can reduce costs substantially compared to ISS, NASA will no doubt be eager to get more "bang for their buck" by sending up even more astronauts. There will certainly be no lack of science to keep them busy. Also, NASA has a large astronaut corps that will need flight opportunities. I imagine they won't be too happy if flight opportunities are cut in half due to half the responsibility shifting to private astronaut corps. Best to capitalize on the new opportunities by expanding the pie across the board.

And may I just say, it is very cool to see things trending in the direction sci-fi has long known it must, where eventually ordinary folk will fill private-sector jobs as space station mechanics. :D

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