Author Topic: Southern Launch  (Read 62308 times)

Offline SciNews

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Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #81 on: 09/19/2020 06:48 am »
https://www.facebook.com/SouthernLaunch/photos/a.2687879754804483/2688055548120237/?type=3&theater

"WE’VE DONE IT!! We have achieved not one, but TWO successful launches today!
We will have an update on payloads shortly, but for now, THANK YOU! Thank you all for your support and encouragement. This is a not only a huge win for Southern Launch but a win for Australia’s sovereign space capabilities.
A huge thank you for the ongoing support of the Koonibba Community, we are looking forward to many successful launches to come!"
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #82 on: 09/19/2020 06:51 am »
From the ABC article.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #83 on: 09/20/2020 11:04 pm »
From the Southern Launch FB page: 
Quote
WE’VE DONE IT!! We have achieved not one, but TWO successful launches today!
We will have an update on payloads shortly, but for now, THANK YOU! Thank you all for your support and encouragement. This is a not only a huge win for Southern Launch but a win for Australia’s sovereign space capabilities.
A huge thank you for the ongoing support of the Koonibba Community, we are looking forward to many successful launches to come!

They were aiming for 85km, but does anyone know how high they got?  TWO successful commercial launches within an hour of each other must surely be some kind of record isn't it??

Here's the link to the ABC News article:  It made TV news on Saturday night in SA, but not in the other states.. I guess it's early days yet.  https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-09-19/australias-first-private-rocket-blasts-off-from-koonibba/12681258

« Last Edit: 09/20/2020 11:06 pm by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #84 on: 09/21/2020 02:40 pm »
And there goes the stealth mode of operation of T-minus Engineering.
https://www.janes.com/defence-news/news-detail/australia-launches-dart-rocket-carrying-prototype-radio-frequency-receiver-for-raaf

And let's add this better article with...
www.defenceconnect.com.au/
Quote
At 10:09am on 19 September 2020, Southern Launch ignited Australia’s first commercial space-capable rocket at the Koonibba Test Range north-west of Ceduna in South Australia.
And in a second first for Australia, only an hour and and 40 minutes later at 11:49am a second space capable launch was safely completed.
A recovery effort is currently underway to locate the DEWC-SP1 payloads and DART rocket stages.
...

But this one is wrong.
Quote
The rocket is unlike any rocket ever launched in Australia, and is part of what is known as ‘New Space’ technologies – small rockets carrying reduced sized satellites using commercially available technologies.”
Any one; SuperLoki / Viper Dart!
But indeed that wasn't offered commercially.

I would like to know what tracking assets Southern Launch/DEWC/RAAF used to track the T-minus Dart. I fear they didn't use a tracking radar. Thus finding the boosters, darts and DEWC-SP1 sensors will be hard.

Edit: possibly also interesting. The payload form-factor was already used by REXUS 26, the Prime team.
« Last Edit: 09/21/2020 03:02 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline CameronD

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #85 on: 09/24/2020 11:39 pm »
From Southern Launch:
Quote
Wow! After a huge week for Southern Launch, we've had time to process all that we have achieved over the past 10 days. To successfully launch not just one, but TWO space-capable rockets before noon on the 19th of September, was a remarkable achievement by the team. We demonstrated that we can provide our customers with safe & responsive access to space. Our processes and protocols were followed flawlessly throughout all 3 launch attempts (including the first launch attempt and misfire on the 15th) thanks to the leadership from our Launch Director, Alexander Linossier.

A huge thank you to DEWC for coming along on this ride with us. We cannot speak highly enough of the team we have worked with over the last 18 months. Your professionalism and work ethic is inspiring and we look forward to working with you on future projects.
Thank you to T-Minus Engineering who, unable to attend due to COVID, trusted us to launch their vehicle from 15,000kms away. The team did a great job providing remote assistance to the SL firing team through a long Dutch night.
And to the Koonibba Community, who welcomed us onto their lands and have supported our mission from the very start, thank you so much, we are honored to have launched from your lands and look forward to many successful launches to come!

https://www.linkedin.com/posts/southernlaunch_wow-after-a-huge-week-for-southern-launch-activity-6714344302023180288-fVeg
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #86 on: 09/25/2020 05:57 am »
Strange that there is no mention if they recovered the payloads or the altitudes reached.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #87 on: 09/25/2020 06:41 am »
Strange that there is no mention if they recovered the payloads or the altitudes reached.

Yes..  Maybe it's classified!!!  ;D

I quite like this pic:
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #88 on: 10/08/2020 01:04 am »
Strange that there is no mention if they recovered the payloads or the altitudes reached.

Yes..  Maybe it's classified!!!  ;D
Maybe the payload data is classified but given the vehicle is commercial one would expect some stats on performance, right? ;)

Offline CameronD

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #89 on: 10/08/2020 09:56 pm »
Strange that there is no mention if they recovered the payloads or the altitudes reached.

Yes..  Maybe it's classified!!!  ;D
Maybe the payload data is classified but given the vehicle is commercial one would expect some stats on performance, right? ;)

Well.. it's Southern Launch's job to send the thing skyward (launch ops) and make sure it doesn't trash anything or any one (range safety) and AFAIK both launches were "nominal" (whatever that may mean.. gotta love that word!) on the day.

Whilst I'm sure it's of passing interest to them, actual performance isn't really their concern - that's for T-Minus to lose sleep over.  :)
« Last Edit: 10/08/2020 09:58 pm by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #90 on: 10/09/2020 07:11 am »
Quote
Norton Consultants is pleased to announce completion of Front-End Engineering Design (FEED) and internal review processes for Southern Launch’s proposed Whalers Way multi-user orbital space launch complex. Planned for construction at the tip of the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia, this complex will facilitate the launch of commercial domestic and international satellites into high inclination orbits (polar and sun-synchronous) from Australian soil.

Working closely with Southern Launch’s design team, our work included:
- Multi-discipline concept design and layout of propellant storage areas, vents, pipework and connections to and from the launch pad.
- Co-ordination and review of the Dangerous Goods Report for the site.
- Preparation of detailed worst-case Quantity-Distance calculations for the site.
- Hazardous Area delineation of the launch pad, cryogenic and non-cryogenic propellant storage areas and surrounding facilities.
- Recommendation of highly flexible fuelling and defueling options for the full range of customer's launch vehicles under consideration.

Typically, rocket launch sites are specially designed and constructed to cater for a specific launch vehicle type, using one type of fuel and one type of oxidiser at each launch pad.  One of many unique design specifications achieved by our design was a requirement for multi-user capability at this site, ensuring different launch vehicles using entirely different combinations of fuel and oxidiser can be launched with only a few days turnaround.

For more information, visit: https://southernlaunch.space/whalers-way

https://www.linkedin.com/posts/urn:li:activity:6720220664646782976/
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #91 on: 10/15/2020 06:02 am »
Strange that there is no mention if they recovered the payloads or the altitudes reached.

Yes..  Maybe it's classified!!!  ;D
Maybe the payload data is classified but given the vehicle is commercial one would expect some stats on performance, right? ;)

Well.. it's Southern Launch's job to send the thing skyward (launch ops) and make sure it doesn't trash anything or any one (range safety) and AFAIK both launches were "nominal" (whatever that may mean.. gotta love that word!) on the day.

Whilst I'm sure it's of passing interest to them, actual performance isn't really their concern - that's for T-Minus to lose sleep over.  :)

I'm just working off the expectations that Southern Launch set on facebook. And while it's not their concern directly I'm quite certain they'd want to speak about customer achievements to attempt to gain more business.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #92 on: 10/19/2020 06:23 am »
15th October 2020

German Aerospace Centre, DLR, sign a Cooperation Agreement with Australia’s Southern Launch

Building on the MOU that was previously signed between DLR – Space Operations and Astronaut Training and Southern Launch on 26 March 2020, the organisations have now signed a Cooperation Agreement further enhancing the relationship.

The Cooperation Agreement aims to implement joint civilian research activities in the field of suborbital and orbital space launch, especially in the field of reusable launch vehicles (RLV). Working together on such activities is a major step towards further developing Southern Launch’s capabilities and launch sites to conduct safe and economically affordable rocket launches.

A notable spin-off from the agreement is that the organisations will work to establish an educational sounding rocket program in Australia, allowing universities to undertake space-based research projects from the Southern Hemisphere.

The signing of the agreement follows the successful launch of two space capable rockets by Southern Launch at the Koonibba Test Range, both completed on 19 September 2020.

DLR are looking into the feasibility of utilising Southern Launch’s Koonibba Test Range for the testing of new rocket technologies and launch equipment, in line with DLR’s efforts to research and develop future reusable launcher technologies. Together DLR and Southern Launch are working towards a launch date of the first DLR research mission in mid-2022.

“This cooperation unlocks flight testing potential that is not otherwise attainable through a joint effort by DLR and Southern Launch. It further strengthens and adds to Mobile Rocket Base’s cooperation with Australian research partners, adding to the growing collaboration of the two countries in space research and utilisation.” says Rainer Kirchhartz, Head of DLR’s Mobile Rocket Base.

“We are very proud to be working with DLR on a number of rocket projects and look forward to contributing into an international space program such as DLR’s” said Lloyd Damp, CEO of Southern Launch.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #93 on: 10/20/2020 02:13 am »
DLR are looking into the feasibility of utilising Southern Launch’s Koonibba Test Range for the testing of new rocket technologies and launch equipment, in line with DLR’s efforts to research and develop future reusable launcher technologies. Together DLR and Southern Launch are working towards a launch date of the first DLR research mission in mid-2022.

“This cooperation unlocks flight testing potential that is not otherwise attainable through a joint effort by DLR and Southern Launch. It further strengthens and adds to Mobile Rocket Base’s cooperation with Australian research partners, adding to the growing collaboration of the two countries in space research and utilisation.” says Rainer Kirchhartz, Head of DLR’s Mobile Rocket Base.

“We are very proud to be working with DLR on a number of rocket projects and look forward to contributing into an international space program such as DLR’s” said Lloyd Damp, CEO of Southern Launch.

Well, that should keep Koonibba busy for a while.  Now all they need is to get over here... hopefully international air travel to SA will be possible by 2022.
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #94 on: 11/08/2020 10:01 pm »
Here's a bit more info on the DLR agreement:
Quote
The cooperation agreement aims to implement joint civilian research activities in the field of suborbital and orbital space launch, especially in the field of reusable launch vehicles (RLV). Working together on such activities is a major step towards further developing Southern Launch’s capabilities and launch sites to conduct safe and economically affordable rocket launches.

DLR has expressed interest in the South Australia Koonibba Test Range to launch and study their new rocket technologies, launch equipment and access to space capabilities – as part of DLR’s objectives in researching and developing future reusable rocket technology, similar to that utilised by many other commercial operators like SpaceX, RocketLab and Blue Origin.

Both Southern Launch and DLR are working towards a 2022 launch date where a DLR rocket will lift off from the Koonibba Test facility and climb to sub-orbital, or orbital altitudes, before re-entering Earth’s atmosphere and descending back to Koonibba.



https://spaceaustralia.com/news/reusable-rockets-launch-south-australia

Quote
“This collaboration is further evidence of South Australia’s attractiveness to international space companies, thanks to our thriving local space industry and proven ability to facilitate successful rocket launches from within the state” - Premier Steven Marshall
« Last Edit: 11/08/2020 10:05 pm by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #95 on: 11/09/2020 04:11 am »
Note that the Australian Artemis budget is only AU$150M over five years currently (US$21M per year). I think we'll need to spend a bit more if we are to give more than a token effort. Australia is also a very rich country with a Federal budget of AU$500B a year, making the current effort only 0.006% of the budget! Unfortunately, its very hard to convince our politicians that spending money on space development and exploration is worthwhile, but its a lot better than it used to be (when it would alternate between 0.002% and nothing).
« Last Edit: 11/09/2020 04:22 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #96 on: 11/09/2020 04:25 am »
ReFEx looks like a mini Starship! Some screen grabs.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #97 on: 11/10/2020 12:26 am »
That Telemetry Station would be at Woomera, I guess?

One advantage of the Australian Outback:  it's so darn flat they'll have no trouble keeping the rocket in line-of-sight lift-off to landing from hundreds of miles away!  :)
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #98 on: 11/10/2020 06:11 am »
The Telemetry Station looks like its near Coober Pedy (famous opal mine site).
« Last Edit: 11/10/2020 06:13 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Nomadd

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Re: Southern Launch
« Reply #99 on: 11/10/2020 06:31 am »
 Strange place, Woomera. Rockets and rocket parts all over, but I didn't see a single person in town while I was there. Just lots of emus.
 Coober Pedy had an abandoned spaceship in a parking lot.
« Last Edit: 11/10/2020 06:32 am by Nomadd »
Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who couldn't hear the music.

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