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I haven't seen anything official.  I happened to see the Madrid DSN pass on DSN Now this morning about 0900 PDT and near the end of the track it was not staying in lock, but that may have been due to low antenna elevation.
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Polaris Dawn will fly at 700 km, possibly at the same orbit as Starlink satellites.

Not the same technical requirements as laser comm between Starlink and ISS.
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SLS was supposed to be ready by the end of 2016. If you assume another $2.64B per year for FY15 and FY16, you get very close to the $11.5B that Nelson was indicating.
Correction, the SLS was supposed to be OPERATIONAL by the end of 2016. From Senate Bill S.3729:
Quote
Developmental work and testing of the core elements and the upper stage should proceed in parallel subject to appropriations. Priority should be placed on the core elements with the goal for operational capability for the core elements not later than December 31, 2016.
That means all testing had to be done before that point, so that they could certify the SLS as operational.
In the context of the 2010 NASA Authorization bill, operational capability just meant that you can operate and use it.

Since Congress didn't define what "operational capability" means, in the normal sense that means that testing is done and the transportation system has been certified for normal use. That is what "use it" means, and it does not mean "testing".

Furthermore, clause 303(a)(2) of the 2010 Authorization Act specifically envisions a test flight before operational capability is achieved:  "the  Administrator may undertake a test of the transportation vehicle at the ISS before that date [Dec. 31, 2016]."

The only out here is that IOC was to be to LEO, not to TLI.  But the difference between LEO and TLI is only ICPS, which has always been been the least risky, least troublesome and least expensive component of SLS.
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Japanese Launchers / Re: Final H-IIA launches
« Last post by zubenelgenubi on Today at 06:09 pm »
F46  IGS Radar-7     sometime in the remainder of 2022
F47  XRISM/SLIM   NET April 2023
F4X  IGS Optical-8  2023
F4X  IGS Radar-8    2023
F50  GOSAT-GW      2023
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Yes, of course, gimbals are required even for coplanar satellites.

The issue arises when there is a user in a different plane and a different altitude. Depending on the relative positions of the satellite and the user, the slew rate of the gimbals may be very high.

Also, apart from generally pointing the user receiver upwards, where do the user ISR(s) affix to the spacecraft?
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Couple of photos posted by NASA Kennedy.

Captions:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasakennedy/52386116283/

Quote
KSC-20220923-PH-SPX01_0001
The Crew Dragon Endurance spacecraft for NASA’s SpaceX Crew-5 mission arrives at the hangar at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A in Florida on Sept. 23, 2022. The capsule arrived at the launch complex after making the short journey from its nearby processing facility at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. NASA astronauts Nicole Aunapu Mann, commander; Josh Cassada, pilot; and mission specialists Koichi Wakata, of JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), and Roscosmos cosmonaut Anna Kikina will lift off aboard Endurance – on the company’s Falcon 9 rocket – from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy. Liftoff is targeted for no earlier than 12:46 p.m. EDT Monday, Oct. 3. Photo credit: SpaceX

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasakennedy/52386307555/

Quote
KSC-20220923-PH-SPX01_0002
The Crew Dragon Endurance spacecraft for NASA’s SpaceX Crew-5 mission arrives at the hangar at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A in Florida on Sept. 23, 2022. The capsule arrived at the launch complex after making the short journey from its nearby processing facility at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. NASA astronauts Nicole Aunapu Mann, commander; Josh Cassada, pilot; and mission specialists Koichi Wakata, of JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), and Roscosmos cosmonaut Anna Kikina will lift off aboard Endurance – on the company’s Falcon 9 rocket – from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy. Liftoff is targeted for no earlier than 12:46 p.m. EDT Monday, Oct. 3. Photo credit: SpaceX
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Good news for Hermes fans: the full-scale ESA mockup at the Musee de l'Air et de l'Espace at Le Bourget is in the repair shop!
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Do we have even rough ideas of a timeline for Polaris 2?

Will Polaris Dawn slipping back 3 months likely push it back as well?
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Why not Terran (specifically vs ABL - Firefly's prior launch attempt I can see making them more likely)?
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Missions To The Moon (HSF) / Re: Artemis 1 Discussion Thread
« Last post by whitelancer64 on Today at 05:56 pm »

Last month NASA posted:

Quote from: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/artemis-i-mission-availability
November 12 – November 27 (preliminary)

12 launch opportunities

No launch availability on November 20, 21, and 26

December 9 – December 23 (preliminary)

11 launch opportunities

No launch availability on December 10, 14, 18, and 23

Also, any windows prior to 11/22 are night launches.  NASA may be leaning toward a daytime launch, especially for the maiden flight.

A daytime launch is desirable, but not required by NASA. They DO require that Orion splash down in daylight.
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