Author Topic: SpaceX F9/Crew Dragon : Axiom-3 : KSC LC-39A : 18 January 2024 (21:49 UTC)  (Read 140288 times)

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Getting caught up on spaceflight news; wondered why I hadn't yet seen pictures of Freedom from Port Canaveral.  Now I know.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1756324349512929578
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Morning folks, Shannon is in a holding pattern south of Port Canaveral. Will push a tweet when they appear to be heading in.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1756410243343385073
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Vessel is self-reporting an ETA of 1pm ET on Sunday.
« Last Edit: 02/10/2024 09:38 pm by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.) My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!" Yes, there are God-given rights. Do you wish to gainsay the Declaration of Independence?

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/planet4589/status/1756558028319392252

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The jettisoned trunk section from Axiom AX-3 has been found in a 233 x 393 km orbit (catalog 58953)

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/jeremykey87/status/1756672347778543988

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@SpaceX returning to Port Canaveral this morning.

Offline catdlr

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https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1756680504235978799

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Arrival! SpaceX recovery ship Shannon delivers Dragon Freedom back to Cape Canaveral following splashdown of the AX-3 crew on Friday. 🎥: http://nsf.live/spacecoast
It's Tony De La Rosa, ...I don't create this stuff, I just report it.

Offline ddspaceman

Marcus Wandt
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Space waltz.

The training prepared me for most of my tasks during the #Muninn mission on the @Space_Station.

But one thing that is difficult to train for is the feeling of microgravity, or how much I have to push myself to get my body translating into the velocity I want, or how I turn into a corner in a good way, or how I reposition myself.

That is difficult to train, so I had to practice a bit up there. 😉 #lifeinorbit

https://twitter.com/astro_marcus/status/1756690584373227797

Offline catdlr

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This post contains a video.

https://twitter.com/Axiom_Space/status/1757125252130169283

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The successful splashdown of the #Ax3 crew reminds us of the exceptional training and support provided by our partners like @RescueSpace
.

« Last Edit: 02/12/2024 06:38 pm by catdlr »
It's Tony De La Rosa, ...I don't create this stuff, I just report it.

Offline Oersted

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https://twitter.com/astro_g_dogg/status/1756107839712506159

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Fantastic entry, splashdown, and crew return today for the
@Axiom_Space
 3 mission. I know all too well that they donít always end like this so these family reunions Earthside always get to me.
@SpaceX
 
@NASA_Astronauts

Reisman accompanied Ilan Ramon's family after Columbia disaster.

Offline ddspaceman

Marcus Wandt
@astro_marcus
Back on my feet.

During my first week back to Earth, the #Muninn science must go on. Scientists are looking into my brain, bones, cells, and heart to monitor changes in my body after three weeks in space.

The effects of microcravity, cosmic radiation and the challenges of a new environment are an important part of human physiology research.

After a full week of gathering more data and readapting to gravity, I will be ready to come back home this Sunday, 18 February. 🇸🇪

Doctors are busy keeping an eye on how I am readjusting to life with gravity at @DLR_SpaceAgency's  :envihab facility. 👩‍⚕️

Medical checks started right after splashdown. The @esa medical and fitness teams are helping me to return to normal with a reconditioning programme. This involves exercises that gradually increase in difficulty, physiotherapy, massages, and lumbar ultrasounds Ė back muscles seem to be particularly fragile after not being used that much in weightlessness. 🏋️‍♂️

Even if I feel great and I havenít been particularly unbalanced or nauseous, it is known that an astronautís immune system is more vulnerable during the first days after a spaceflight. 👨‍🚀

#Muninn

https://twitter.com/astro_marcus/status/1758110435973144821

Offline mn

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Marcus Wandt
@astro_marcus
Back on my feet.

During my first week back to Earth, the #Muninn science must go on. Scientists are looking into my brain, bones, cells, and heart to monitor changes in my body after three weeks in space.

The effects of microcravity, cosmic radiation and the challenges of a new environment are an important part of human physiology research.

After a full week of gathering more data and readapting to gravity, I will be ready to come back home this Sunday, 18 February. 🇸🇪

Doctors are busy keeping an eye on how I am readjusting to life with gravity at @DLR_SpaceAgency's  :envihab facility. 👩‍⚕️

Medical checks started right after splashdown. The @esa medical and fitness teams are helping me to return to normal with a reconditioning programme. This involves exercises that gradually increase in difficulty, physiotherapy, massages, and lumbar ultrasounds Ė back muscles seem to be particularly fragile after not being used that much in weightlessness. 🏋️‍♂️

Even if I feel great and I havenít been particularly unbalanced or nauseous, it is known that an astronautís immune system is more vulnerable during the first days after a spaceflight. 👨‍🚀

#Muninn

https://twitter.com/astro_marcus/status/1758110435973144821

I am going to ask a possibly very dumb question, but I'll go ahead anyway.

We've been sending humans to space for how many years now? astronauts have been medically studied on return in every way imaginable. ISTM this has been studied up to the wazoo.

Are we really still studying this? or is this just 'me too' science? (if there's a better thread to discuss this, please let me know. ty)

Offline mandrewa

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I am going to ask a possibly very dumb question, but I'll go ahead anyway.

We've been sending humans to space for how many years now? astronauts have been medically studied on return in every way imaginable. ISTM this has been studied up to the wazoo.

Are we really still studying this? or is this just 'me too' science? (if there's a better thread to discuss this, please let me know. ty)

Statistically speaking that would still be a rather small sample.

Over 600 people have been to space.

Let's say we have access to medical data on half of them.

Let's pretend that we medically examined each of these people in the same way (definitely not true).

That would give us a sample size of 300.  That's still pretty small.

The odds are the we are still only working on the first significant digit, so to speak, in trying to explore how bodies respond to space.

Likely there are now a number of known issues of concern that they are now trying to gather data on, and so there are tests being done now that were never done with many of the people that have been to space.  And that makes the sample size even smaller.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Offline mn

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I am going to ask a possibly very dumb question, but I'll go ahead anyway.

We've been sending humans to space for how many years now? astronauts have been medically studied on return in every way imaginable. ISTM this has been studied up to the wazoo.

Are we really still studying this? or is this just 'me too' science? (if there's a better thread to discuss this, please let me know. ty)

Statistically speaking that would still be a rather small sample.

Over 600 people have been to space.

Let's say we have access to medical data on half of them.

Let's pretend that we medically examined each of these people in the same way (definitely not true).

That would give us a sample size of 300.  That's still pretty small.

The odds are the we are still only working on the first significant digit, so to speak, in trying to explore how bodies respond to space.

Likely there are now a number of known issues of concern that they are now trying to gather data on, and so there are tests being done now that were never done with many of the people that have been to space.  And that makes the sample size even smaller.

What you are saying makes perfect sense.

I guess the question is: is this actually what is being done? Are the people behind these tests actually looking at already available data and saying 'ok this question is unanswered, let's try to get more data on a specific question'.

Is this actually being done or are you just describing the hypothetical ideal.

Offline ajmarco

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I am going to ask a possibly very dumb question, but I'll go ahead anyway.

We've been sending humans to space for how many years now? astronauts have been medically studied on return in every way imaginable. ISTM this has been studied up to the wazoo.

Are we really still studying this? or is this just 'me too' science? (if there's a better thread to discuss this, please let me know. ty)

Statistically speaking that would still be a rather small sample.

Over 600 people have been to space.

Let's say we have access to medical data on half of them.

Let's pretend that we medically examined each of these people in the same way (definitely not true).

That would give us a sample size of 300.  That's still pretty small.

The odds are the we are still only working on the first significant digit, so to speak, in trying to explore how bodies respond to space.

Likely there are now a number of known issues of concern that they are now trying to gather data on, and so there are tests being done now that were never done with many of the people that have been to space.  And that makes the sample size even smaller.

What you are saying makes perfect sense.

I guess the question is: is this actually what is being done? Are the people behind these tests actually looking at already available data and saying 'ok this question is unanswered, let's try to get more data on a specific question'.

Is this actually being done or are you just describing the hypothetical ideal.

A lot of research is being headed up by TRISH, which is authorized by NASA to coordinate and spearhead all of this.

NASA Link

TRISH Center Link

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/commandermla/status/1764807285346369557

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Good to be back in Hawthorne with the #Ax3 crew to thank the @spacex team, just as another #Dragon is on its way to the #ISS.

Offline jmt27

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Astronaut and Saab chief test pilot Marcus Wandt meets Jessica Meir and Christer Fuglesang for an exciting discussion about life in space. It is the first time all three Swedish astronauts have met since Marcus returned from the International Space Station. We see the trio discussing their space missions, sharing their most memorable experiences, talking about the differences between traveling in a Dragon capsule, Soyuz rocket, and space shuttle, and revealing the most common question astronauts get.


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