Author Topic: SpaceX F9 : Starlink Group 2-1 : VSFB SLC-4E : 13/14 September 2021 (03:55 UTC)  (Read 69773 times)

Offline Jansen

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Discussion thread for Starlink Group 2-1, the first dedicated Starlink high inclination mission

NSF Threads for Starlink 2-1: Discussion

Successful launch September 13, 2021 at 8:55pm PDT (0355 UTC on the 14th) on Falcon 9 (booster 1049-10) from Vandenberg Space Force Base pad SLC-4E. ASDS landing was successful on OCISLY. Recovery support ship is expected to be NRC Quest.  Fairing recovery is expected from the water.

Payload: A batch of 51 Starlink satellites with laser intersatellite links. Deployment orbit of 212x343km at 70 degrees inclination.

Quote
SpaceX is targeting Monday, September 13 for a Falcon 9 launch of 51 Starlink satellites from Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California. The instantaneous window is at 8:55 p.m. PDT, or September 14 at 3:55 UTC, and a backup opportunity is available on Tuesday, September 14 at 8:56 p.m. PDT, or September 15 at 3:56 UTC.

The booster supporting this mission previously launched Telstar 18 VANTAGE, Iridium-8, and seven Starlink missions. Following stage separation, SpaceX will land Falcon 9ís first stage on the ďOf Course I Still Love YouĒ droneship, which will be stationed in the Pacific Ocean. One half of Falcon 9ís fairing halves previously supported NROL-108 and the other previously flew on GPS III-3 and Turksat-5A.

Please use the Starlink Discussion Thread for all general discussion on Starlink.

Check the Starlink Index Thread for links to more Starlink information.

L2 SpaceX:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?board=60.0

From a previous mission's Press Kit:
Quote
Each Starlink satellite weights approximately 260 kg and features a compact, flat-panel design that minimizes volume, allowing for a dense launch stack to take full advantage of Falcon 9ís launch capabilities. With four powerful phased array and two parabolic antennas on each satellite ... At end of their life cycle, the satellites will utilize their on-board propulsion system to deorbit over the course of a few months. In the unlikely event their propulsion system becomes inoperable, the satellites will burn up in Earthís atmosphere within 1-5 years, significantly less than the hundreds or thousands of years required at higher altitudes. Further, Starlink components are designed for full demisability.

Starlink is targeting service to near global coverage of the populated world by 2021. Additional information on the system can be found at starlink.com.
« Last Edit: 09/14/2021 08:14 pm by gongora »

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #1 on: 05/26/2021 09:59 pm »
0817-EX-ST-2021 Starlink RF Mission 1-5

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This application uses information from previous grant 1379-EX-ST-2020. This STA is necessary to authorize launch vehicle communications for Starlink RF Mission 1-5 from SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, and the experimental recovery operation following the Falcon 9 launch. The application includes sub-orbital first stage and orbital second stage. Trajectory data shall be provided directly to NTIA, USAF, and NASA. All downrange Earth stations are receive-only. The recovery portion is limited to two functions: 1) pre-launch checkout test of the command uplink from an onshore station at launch site, and 2) command of landed stage from recovery boat. All operations are pre-coordinated with the Launch Range. Launch licensing authority is FAA Office of Commercial Space Transportation.

Requested Period of Operation
Operation Start Date:   07/01/2021
Operation End Date:   01/01/2022

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #2 on: 05/26/2021 10:01 pm »
The previous grant for 1379-EX-ST-2020 mentioned above is the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich mission, which was the last SpaceX launch from Vandenberg.

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #3 on: 05/26/2021 10:25 pm »
ASDS recovery location is

North  29  22  32   West  117  50  59
Datum:  NAD 83

Online oldAtlas_Eguy

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #4 on: 05/26/2021 11:07 pm »
Actual evidence of real hard plans for launches mid/late summer from VAFB. But they still need a booster and an ASDS on the west coast to make it happen.

Online niwax

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #5 on: 05/26/2021 11:35 pm »
July seems a bit quick to get a ship to the west coast. Didn't the last Panama canal transfer take a few months?
Which booster has the most soot? SpaceX booster launch history! (discussion)

Offline Josh_from_Canada

Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #6 on: 05/26/2021 11:56 pm »
What orbital inclination would that translate to?
ASDS recovery location is

North  29  22  32   West  117  50  59
Datum:  NAD 83
Launches Seen: Atlas-V OA-7,

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #7 on: 05/27/2021 12:07 am »
What orbital inclination would that translate to?

97.6 degrees

Online soltasto

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #8 on: 05/27/2021 12:22 am »
What orbital inclination would that translate to?

97.6 degrees

Those coordinates actually give exactly 70į
« Last Edit: 05/27/2021 12:22 am by soltasto »

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #9 on: 05/27/2021 01:27 am »
What orbital inclination would that translate to?

97.6 degrees

Those coordinates actually give exactly 70į

Yep.  (I'm not a graphic artist, can you tell?)

Offline vaporcobra

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #10 on: 05/27/2021 04:39 am »
ASDS recovery location is

North  29  22  32   West  117  50  59
Datum:  NAD 83

It's about 640 km (~400 mi) downrange, FWIW.

Offline vaporcobra

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #11 on: 05/27/2021 04:42 am »
Those coordinates actually give exactly 70į

No big surprise there, starting with the biggest tranche first :)

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #12 on: 05/27/2021 04:43 am »
What orbital inclination would that translate to?

97.6 degrees

Those coordinates actually give exactly 70į

Okay, I actually did the calculations, and I got:

Distance 639.8km

Azimuth 155.25

arccos(cos(34.632)∗sin(155.25))= 69.8498686 degrees

« Last Edit: 05/27/2021 04:57 am by Jansen »

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #13 on: 05/27/2021 08:08 pm »
https://twitter.com/nextspaceflight/status/1397997294314684417

Possible booster for this launch. Itís B1049, which had its legs taken off in Port Canaveral.
« Last Edit: 05/27/2021 08:15 pm by Jansen »

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #14 on: 05/27/2021 08:19 pm »
https://twitter.com/FarryFaz/status/1393337977238134785
Quote
Legs off for B1051. I Wonder why? 📷: JH
B1051 also had legs removed, wondering if itís going out west as well.

slight edit by zubenelgenubi
« Last Edit: 05/27/2021 10:10 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Online cwr

Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #15 on: 05/27/2021 09:35 pm »
https://twitter.com/FarryFaz/status/1393337977238134785
Quote
Legs off for B1051. I Wonder why? 📷: JH
B1051 also had legs removed, wondering if itís going out west as well.

Did you mean "1049 also had it's legs removed"
and that 1051 would be joining 1049 at Vandenberg  to launch Starlink payloads?

Carl

slight edit by zubenelgenubi
« Last Edit: 05/27/2021 10:17 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Online zubenelgenubi

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #16 on: 05/27/2021 10:01 pm »
Cross-posting for clarity:
https://twitter.com/julia_bergeron/status/1392304441727111168
Quote from: tweet by Farrielle
Not the best photo but why do you think they took the legs off B1049.9? 📷 Jon Hunter
Quote from: tweet reply by Julia
It may have been faster if they needed it back on base with another booster inbound soon. Legs may have been giving them trouble retracting? Or maybe it's part of the inspection to have the legs off and it turns out to be less time consuming to do it at this stage.

Legs were removed from B1049, not sure why.
Now we know why!
***

Did you mean "1049 also had it's legs removed"
and that 1051 would be joining 1049 at Vandenberg to launch Starlink payloads?

Carl
Question 1: I think Jansen meant what he wrote.
Question 2: Yes, the hypothesis is: Will 1051 join 1049 at Vandenberg to launch Starlink payloads?
« Last Edit: 05/27/2021 10:13 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline klod

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #17 on: 05/28/2021 06:09 am »
I don't understand how they can do this flight in July. Drone isn't even underway to the west coast. And it would take about 2 month. Though i thought that B1049 or B1051 might be one way flight.

Offline Jansen

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #18 on: 05/28/2021 10:11 am »
I don't understand how they can do this flight in July. Drone isn't even underway to the west coast. And it would take about 2 month. Though i thought that B1049 or B1051 might be one way flight.

Many people have been watching McDonough Marine because that is where all of the ASDS have come from so far, including ASOG (MARMAC 302). However, I donít believe they have extensive operations on the west coast.

From what I recall, 300 foot barges are some of the most extensively used due to large transport volumes and load-bearing capacity. There are plenty of them around, and some have them are larger and more capable that the MARMAC series.

SpaceX has been planning these west coast operations for years. Given that ASDS shortage is now holding back the launch cadence, it would make sense to have ASOG on the east coast for full recovery of Falcon Heavy and for F9 operational flexibility.

In that case, itís entirely possible that another drone ship has been leased and modified at a west coast or Asia-Pacific shipyard.

Another theory would be that there is a MARMAC 305 built in the last 5 years since their catalog was updated. This could explain Elonís tweets in 2018 about ASOG.

Iím not advocating for any of these theories, just putting it out there.

Offline DreamyPickle

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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink : VSFB SLC-4E : August 2021
« Reply #19 on: 05/28/2021 10:13 am »
A bit strange that they're starting on the 70 degree shell. I'd expect the polar orbit shell to go first so that they can claim world-wide coverage.

Maybe lasers are not yet ready?

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