Author Topic: ISS 25 years old  (Read 3096 times)

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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ISS 25 years old
« on: 11/21/2023 06:51 pm »
The first ISS module was launched on November 20th 1998. This thread is for anything marking that anniversary.







« Last Edit: 11/21/2023 07:12 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »


Online catdlr

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #2 on: 11/22/2023 07:44 pm »
Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #3 on: 11/22/2023 07:44 pm »
Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

Online Coastal Ron

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #4 on: 11/22/2023 08:11 pm »
The International Space Station (ISS) has been a WONDERFUL experiment!

Not cheap in any way, but we have learned so much from operating it, and we could have only learned so much from operating such a station.

Some of the achievements include:

- Creating an international coalition to insulate the station from the fiscal ups and downs of any one nation.

- Operating an international coalition to keep the station occupied and doing increasingly harder experiments.

- Pushing NASA outside of the "Build a rocket for each new program" paradigm, and allow the station to be supported by an increasing number of launch vehicles and spacecraft.

Before the ISS we viewed activity in space as individual "missions", but now humanity has occupied space CONTINUOUSLY for over 23 years on the ISS! The ISS is showing us a peek at our future in space, where hardware is not disposable, but reusable, and that we have to understand how to maintain our "homes" in space.

I fear that indecision and political considerations will lead to a break in our occupancy of space, but I hope that the ISS will provide us with MANY lessons about how humanity can eventually expand out into space.
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #5 on: 11/27/2023 03:53 pm »

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #6 on: 12/04/2023 03:17 pm »

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #7 on: 12/06/2023 05:04 pm »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #8 on: 12/06/2023 06:18 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasa_johnson/status/1732428788967920034

Quote
25 years since the assembly of the @Space_Station!

On Dec. 6, 1998, Endeavour and her six-person crew mated Unity, the first U.S. element of the station, to the previously launched Zarya module. Designed and built by engineers thousands of miles apart, the first two modules of the orbiting laboratory fit perfectly together when they met in space.

Offline RoadWithoutEnd

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #9 on: 12/06/2023 06:51 pm »
Some of the achievements include:

- Creating an international coalition to insulate the station from the fiscal ups and downs of any one nation.

- Operating an international coalition to keep the station occupied and doing increasingly harder experiments.

I'll give you the coalition part, that's been a superb achievement.  Somehow it continues despite one of the partners waging a major regional proxy war against the other four.  It has not, however, grown past serving the status quo.

Claiming that the station's experiments have gotten "increasingly harder" is tough to justify, at least to a non-expert.  To a modestly informed follower of space developments like me, they've been touting the exact same research over and over, from before the station even existed, doing similar things in Shuttle's labs in the '80s...if not the same things in Salyut and Skylab missions in the '70s. 

The few experiments that at least looked novel, like the Bigelow module and the rollout solar panels, are frankly underwhelming for a 12-figure costing, twenty-year program.

Pushing NASA outside of the "Build a rocket for each new program" paradigm, and allow the station to be supported by an increasing number of launch vehicles and spacecraft.

Indeed, but only one of them has managed to become a legit commercial vehicle with a growing private business.  Cygnus and Antares have remained rare and exclusively tied to NASA.  Ditto the Japanese and European vessels, retired before anything more could become of them. 

Before the ISS we viewed activity in space as individual "missions", but now humanity has occupied space CONTINUOUSLY for over 23 years on the ISS!


It has produced a very stable status quo.  One with very minimal growth in any dimension, and failing to directly facilitate any greater aspirations. 

Plan to increase volume: No. 

Plan to increase sustained population: No. 

More than one station in operation simultaneously: No.

Investigate artificial spin gravity: No.

Boost to high orbits: No.

Possible utility for refueling depots: No.

In an orbit to facilitate traffic between Earth and the Moon or Mars?  No.

ISS exists for status quo, as the status quo existed decades ago.  It has done a job of that.  It offers little or nothing to do anything more.
Walk the road without end, and all tomorrows unfold like music.

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #10 on: 12/07/2023 03:48 pm »
https://twitter.com/space_station/status/1732784532644843707

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One for the books. 👨‍🚀🛰

The first spacewalk to assemble the space station was underway 25 years ago today. Astronauts James Newman and Jerry Ross mated 40 cables and connectors between the Unity and Zarya modules during a seven-hour, 21-minute excursion.

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #11 on: 12/07/2023 06:51 pm »
https://flic.kr/p/2pkdaNM

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NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center
25 Years Ago: The First Pieces of the International Space Station


The mated Russian-built Zarya (left) and U.S.-built Unity modules are backdropped against the blackness of space and Earth’s horizon shortly after leaving Endeavour’s cargo bay on Dec. 13, 1998. A few days earlier, on Dec. 6, 1998, the space shuttle Endeavour, mission STS-88, launched from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida carrying the Unity connecting module and two pressurized mating adapters. The same day, the STS-88 crew captured the Russian Zarya module, launched Nov. 20, and mated it with the Unity node. Unity was the first piece of the International Space Station provided by the United States.
 
The components in the current space station were built in various countries around the world, with each piece performing once connected in space by complex robotics systems and humans in spacesuits—a testament to teamwork and cultural coordination.
 
Image credit: NASA

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #12 on: 12/11/2023 05:45 am »
https://twitter.com/vp/status/1733967511043920288

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For 25 years, the International Space Station has impacted our view of Earth and who we are. It has served as a lesson in international cooperation and the importance of taking action to care for our planet.

Happy birthday, @Space_Station!

Offline Nighthawk117

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #13 on: 01/01/2024 01:49 pm »
I've been saving this Popular Mechanics article since October 1995.
« Last Edit: 01/01/2024 01:55 pm by Nighthawk117 »

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #14 on: 01/12/2024 12:52 am »
She was so beautiful when she was young.

Image depicting Expedition 8 configuration, 20 years ago. (Credit: http://www.spacefacts.de/iss/english/exp_8.htm)
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Offline whitelancer64

Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #15 on: 01/12/2024 01:37 am »
Some of the achievements include:

- Creating an international coalition to insulate the station from the fiscal ups and downs of any one nation.

- Operating an international coalition to keep the station occupied and doing increasingly harder experiments.

I'll give you the coalition part, that's been a superb achievement.  Somehow it continues despite one of the partners waging a major regional proxy war against the other four.  It has not, however, grown past serving the status quo.

Claiming that the station's experiments have gotten "increasingly harder" is tough to justify, at least to a non-expert.  To a modestly informed follower of space developments like me, they've been touting the exact same research over and over, from before the station even existed, doing similar things in Shuttle's labs in the '80s...if not the same things in Salyut and Skylab missions in the '70s. 

The few experiments that at least looked novel, like the Bigelow module and the rollout solar panels, are frankly underwhelming for a 12-figure costing, twenty-year program.


There have been literally thousands of scientific publications based on ISS research. Yes, there has been a lot of biomedical research done - some of which is based on initial investigations started in the 70s and 80s - and a lot of that research has borne fruit in new treatments for diseases. There has also been lots of investigations into physics and materials science, as well as technology development.

Flashy hardware development like the roll-out solar arrays are much less impressive to me than some of the other science investigations that have taken place on the ISS. NASA publishes yearly updates on the results of ISS research, you should take a look at some of that.

Quote

Pushing NASA outside of the "Build a rocket for each new program" paradigm, and allow the station to be supported by an increasing number of launch vehicles and spacecraft.

Indeed, but only one of them has managed to become a legit commercial vehicle with a growing private business.  Cygnus and Antares have remained rare and exclusively tied to NASA.  Ditto the Japanese and European vessels, retired before anything more could become of them. 

Before the ISS we viewed activity in space as individual "missions", but now humanity has occupied space CONTINUOUSLY for over 23 years on the ISS!


It has produced a very stable status quo.  One with very minimal growth in any dimension, and failing to directly facilitate any greater aspirations. 

Plan to increase volume: No.

New Axiom modules coming soon.
Quote

Plan to increase sustained population: No. 

Actually, that has already happened with the increase in permanent crew from 6 to 7. Also, will be more crew on board long-term with the new Axiom modules as well.
Quote

More than one station in operation simultaneously: No.

??? There are currently two operational space stations in Earth orbit.
Quote

Investigate artificial spin gravity: No.

Yes, but not on a human scale. JAXA has done spin gravity research in the Kibo module.
Quote

Boost to high orbits: No.

  ??? Never was any plan to.
Quote

Possible utility for refueling depots: No.

Also never was a plan to. Some 60s / 70s / 80s concepts for that, but never in the design of the ISS we have now.
Quote

In an orbit to facilitate traffic between Earth and the Moon or Mars?  No.

Also never really was a plan to. Same as previous.
Quote

ISS exists for status quo, as the status quo existed decades ago.  It has done a job of that.  It offers little or nothing to do anything more.
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Online catdlr

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Re: ISS 25 years old
« Reply #16 on: 01/27/2024 06:27 am »
« Last Edit: 01/27/2024 06:27 am by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

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