Author Topic: Biden-Harris Administration Extends Space Station Operations Through 2030  (Read 27442 times)

Online yg1968

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Online yg1968

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Not surprisingly, ESA is on board with the extension:

https://twitter.com/AschbacherJosef/status/1477005108164628483
« Last Edit: 12/31/2021 07:03 pm by yg1968 »

Online JayWee

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So Russia is onboard too?

Offline Star One

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I am guessing JAXA & CSA will be onboard as well.

Online yg1968

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« Last Edit: 01/06/2022 04:18 pm by yg1968 »

Online yg1968

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ISS 2030: NASA Extends Operations of the International Space Station


Offline MDMoery

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Gives us just enough time for Axiom Station to be fully self-sufficient.  I am very optimistic about Axiom if for no other reason on the basis of who is running it.  The only private company in the world who has a staff who has actually been responsible for successfully building an operational space station.

One thing I have been curious about.  At the point that Axiom is at the self-sufficient stage, would the the US part of the station be able to operate if the Russian segment was disconnected?
« Last Edit: 01/13/2022 03:34 am by MDMoery »

Online whitelancer64

Gives us just enough time for Axiom Station to be fully self-sufficient.  I am very optimistic about Axiom if for no other reason on the basis of who is running it.  The only private company in the world who has a staff who has actually been responsible for successfully building an operational space station.

One thing I have been curious about.  At the point that Axiom is at the self-sufficient stage, would the the US part of the station be able to operate if the Russian segment was disconnected?

Russia's current plan is to not disconnect any of the current ISS modules.
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Online yg1968

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Online yg1968

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Online yg1968

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ESA's decision on extending the ISS is expected at CM22 (ESA Ministerial Council in Paris, France
on November 22nd and 23rd 2022):

See slide 23:
https://esamultimedia.esa.int/docs/corporate/JA_ESA_Press_Conference_18_Jan_2022.pdf
« Last Edit: 01/18/2022 11:20 pm by yg1968 »

Offline PeterAlt

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So, there’s no technical or time-restraint reasons now (except maybe political) for Russia not to go through with their original expansion plans for the RS. At the very least, they should open the unused node module’s ports to Russian private use.


I would love to see ISS grow to maximum build before it’s decommissioned in 2030.

Offline RonM

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So, there’s no technical or time-restraint reasons now (except maybe political) for Russia not to go through with their original expansion plans for the RS. At the very least, they should open the unused node module’s ports to Russian private use.


I would love to see ISS grow to maximum build before it’s decommissioned in 2030.

There is a time-restraint reason; is it worth the cost to prepare and launch modules if the modules are only going to be used for a few years? Nothing is ready to go. Russia may not be able to restart these programs and launch them before 2030, only eight years from now.

Offline spacenut

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I'm not sure about this move.  How much money could be switched to the Artemis program?  Would it speed up the return to the moon?  What if Russia want's out, and wants to deorbit their modules? 


Online yg1968

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I'm not sure about this move.  How much money could be switched to the Artemis program?  Would it speed up the return to the moon?  What if Russia want's out, and wants to deorbit their modules?

According to Phil McAlister, $1.5B could be saved using Commercial LEO Destinations habitats. However, these habitats won't be ready until 2028 (there is a planned overlap of two years). The Trump Administration tried to end ISS in 2025 but Congress was not on board with that at all. I think that this is the only compromise that Congress was willing to accept.

See below for more on this:

NASA preps for ISS retirement, commercial stations:
https://www.mynews13.com/fl/orlando/news/2022/01/19/nasa-preps-for-iss-retirement--commercial-stations-

Quote from: the article
McAlister said that by retiring the ISS, it should save NASA about $1.5 billion annually.

“And in this case, we don’t need any increased appropriations. We’re just using our money smarter,” McAlister said. “And that is going to be a key enabler for our Artemis missions going forward as well as freeing up the personnel resources.”

In response to a question from one of the committee members, McAlister said that NASA’s obligation of running the ISS is about $3.5 billion each year. He noted that half a billion of that are activities that NASA will want to continue to do in LEO with or without the Space Station and it will cost about $1 billion to purchase the services they need from a commercial LEO destination.
« Last Edit: 02/02/2022 12:50 am by yg1968 »

Offline PeterAlt

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So, there’s no technical or time-restraint reasons now (except maybe political) for Russia not to go through with their original expansion plans for the RS. At the very least, they should open the unused node module’s ports to Russian private use.


I would love to see ISS grow to maximum build before it’s decommissioned in 2030.

There is a time-restraint reason; is it worth the cost to prepare and launch modules if the modules are only going to be used for a few years? Nothing is ready to go. Russia may not be able to restart these programs and launch them before 2030, only eight years from now.


Russia’s previous plan was to eventually disconnect the newer modules and connect them to the planned independent station. If they were to launch NEM-1 before 2030, it would make sense to detach at least that one module. Since the new station will be in a different orbit, would a Progress be capable of delivering a single module to a new orbit, or would a new vehicle be required to transfer its orbit?

Offline DreamyPickle

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Cooperation with Russia prevents more effective sanctions and should be considered a liability.

Russians should be encouraged to detach their modules.

Offline RonM

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So, there’s no technical or time-restraint reasons now (except maybe political) for Russia not to go through with their original expansion plans for the RS. At the very least, they should open the unused node module’s ports to Russian private use.


I would love to see ISS grow to maximum build before it’s decommissioned in 2030.

There is a time-restraint reason; is it worth the cost to prepare and launch modules if the modules are only going to be used for a few years? Nothing is ready to go. Russia may not be able to restart these programs and launch them before 2030, only eight years from now.


Russia’s previous plan was to eventually disconnect the newer modules and connect them to the planned independent station. If they were to launch NEM-1 before 2030, it would make sense to detach at least that one module. Since the new station will be in a different orbit, would a Progress be capable of delivering a single module to a new orbit, or would a new vehicle be required to transfer its orbit?

I'm not an expert on orbital mechanics but based on what others have said it takes a lot of delta V to change orbital plane. I'm guessing it's not practical because the new Russian station ROSS will be in a sun-synchronous orbit. That's a 47 degree change from ISS.

Offline PeterAlt

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So, there’s no technical or time-restraint reasons now (except maybe political) for Russia not to go through with their original expansion plans for the RS. At the very least, they should open the unused node module’s ports to Russian private use.


I would love to see ISS grow to maximum build before it’s decommissioned in 2030.

There is a time-restraint reason; is it worth the cost to prepare and launch modules if the modules are only going to be used for a few years? Nothing is ready to go. Russia may not be able to restart these programs and launch them before 2030, only eight years from now.


Russia’s previous plan was to eventually disconnect the newer modules and connect them to the planned independent station. If they were to launch NEM-1 before 2030, it would make sense to detach at least that one module. Since the new station will be in a different orbit, would a Progress be capable of delivering a single module to a new orbit, or would a new vehicle be required to transfer its orbit?

I'm not an expert on orbital mechanics but based on what others have said it takes a lot of delta V to change orbital plane. I'm guessing it's not practical because the new Russian station ROSS will be in a sun-synchronous orbit. That's a 47 degree change from ISS.


The plan is sun synchronous orbit now? They change their minds every several months or seems.

Online yg1968

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« Last Edit: 02/02/2022 12:56 am by yg1968 »

Tags: Russia ISS dragon 2 
 

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