Author Topic: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)  (Read 47608 times)

Offline mtlapointe

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #20 on: 01/11/2021 08:55 pm »
If you watch the video someone posted above, there will be brackets added to the original Solar Array Mast Canisters and the new iROSA arrays will mount and deploy from there.

Offline mtlapointe

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #21 on: 01/11/2021 09:04 pm »
I'll ask the obvious question... why are there six and not eight ROSAs?

Because the new arrays are far more efficient, only 6 are required to provide sufficient power well into the future.

Offline SMS

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Offline mtlapointe

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #23 on: 01/11/2021 09:12 pm »
Here is a video of ground deployment of the first iROSA array at DSS in Goleta, CA:


Offline pospa

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #24 on: 01/13/2021 02:01 pm »
Will the new solar panels be in addition to the existing ones? (if so where will they be located)
Or replace some of them? (if so, how will the existing ones be disposed of)

See page 5 of this document:
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20190032191/downloads/20190032191.pdf

Offline Nomadd

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #25 on: 01/14/2021 05:25 am »
 Is 160 kw for the old arrays right? I hadn't heard that they were that degraded.
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Offline russianhalo117

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #26 on: 01/14/2021 05:57 am »
I'll ask the obvious question... why are there six and not eight ROSAs?

Because the new arrays are far more efficient, only 6 are required to provide sufficient power well into the future.
Because S6 SAW's are the newest and contract options will not be exercised until they first exceed their design life and ISS is officially extended beyond 2025 with ROSCOSMOS being the holdout at this time because of new internal mandates et al. The original plan before shuttle programme end was to retract and remove and replace Solar Array Blanket Boxes as a single unit. That isn't possible today so IROSA is the workaround solution for ISS Extension and utilization.

Offline cohberg

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #27 on: 01/19/2021 04:57 pm »
As part of the mod kit referenced above, there are two ~8ft long struts (per array) that brace the upper triangle (which the IROSA arrays mount to) against the solar array blanket box launch bracket.

I was wondering how multiple ~8ft long pieces of equipment got shipped as pressurized cargo for EVA-71. I did finally find that they were launched on NG-14 but still struggled to understand how they were packed. You would need custom mounts / enclosures / rearranged cargo layout etc. to accommodate something that long.

Turns out the clever engineers at NASA (that is cleverer than tunnel visioned me) have figured out an innovative technique of sending up boltable sections instead of monolithic struts. /s It does not make sense to burn CTBs and time on custom oversized packaging that is only going to be used once. ;D Instead, the shorter segments look like they could easily fit in an M02 bag or smaller (You can also see the segment details in the CAD model).

You can see Walker and Rubin assembling them in the attached composited / annotated photos.

It appears to still be a tight fit in the airlock but I'm sure that they've worked on the geometry and modeling + developed detailed procedures on the sequence to egress / how to arrange everything.
« Last Edit: 01/20/2023 06:30 pm by cohberg »

Online SWGlassPit

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #28 on: 01/27/2021 04:23 pm »
Do we know why the mid strut appears to telescope?

I'm guessing that
1. If the tolerances were too tight that they would have difficulty assembling it and needed "slack" in the assembly. The EVA steps have them engaging all the push in place pins (PIP) first before tightening the collars
2. The long lower struts are bolted (as apposed to telescoping as well as the loads are greater radially and less from side to side + they needed a fixed triangle (lower strut, mast tower and the upper triangle) to get the geometry correct.

This is more or less correct.  It allows the correct length to be dialed in, which could vary on orbit due to thermal expansion, etc.  Fully collapsed, the telescoping strut also takes up less room on the ride up and in the airlock.

Offline Space Pete

Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #29 on: 02/19/2021 11:13 am »
A look at how the iROSAs will be delivered to the ISS - on a pallet that will be removed from the Dragon Trunk, and placed on the POA.
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Offline Rondaz

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #30 on: 02/24/2021 06:59 pm »
U.S. Spacewalk 71 Animation


Offline russianhalo117

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #31 on: 02/25/2021 12:37 am »
A look at how the iROSAs will be delivered to the ISS - on a pallet that will be removed from the Dragon Trunk, and placed on the POA.
HTV-9 EP will need to jettisoned prior to the EVA's.

Offline Space Pete

Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #32 on: 02/26/2021 09:32 am »
HTV-9 EP will need to jettisoned prior to the EVA's.

Which will be done by the SSRMS apparently!
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Offline Hog

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #33 on: 02/26/2021 01:36 pm »
HTV-9 EP.

HTV-9=H-2 Transfer Vehicle-9 which is the Japan ISS transfer vehicle

EP=Exposed Pallet?
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Offline russianhalo117

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #34 on: 02/26/2021 08:52 pm »
HTV-9 EP.

HTV-9=H-2 Transfer Vehicle-9 which is the Japan ISS transfer vehicle

EP=Exposed Pallet?
Yes. Alternate name is Unpressurized Logistics Carrier but MHI and JAXA primarily associate ULC with the HTV Module section the EP is housed in for flight.

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #35 on: 03/19/2021 01:07 am »
Re-posting this in this thread. I looked at all the documents so far, and none listed mass of the iROSA arrays.

Why is this so hard to find?? This is a key piece of information for architectural trade studies. I swear to Goddard, Boeing, if you're insisting on keeping this "proprietary," I hope SpaceX beats SLS core to space with Starship.




So, plenty of info is available for the subscale ROSA array demo on ISS.

But for the life of me, I can't find a scrap of info on the actual mass of the ROSA *upgrades* for the ISS's arrays.

I can find a bunch of hyper-optimistic figures from early SBIR work done by DSS for ROSA, but no actual final mass figures for these 25kW ROSA array sections. Anyone know how many kilograms each of them are?

The lack of information is frustrating compared to the wealth of info on the old arrays.
« Last Edit: 03/19/2021 01:07 am by Robotbeat »
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Offline ncb1397

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #36 on: 03/19/2021 12:12 pm »
Presumably, we get those (or an approximate value once you back out a guesstimate for the carriers) in the press kit for the CRS missions they fly on when they do the manifest breakdown. It was similarly very difficult to find mass figures for commercial crew vehicles basically until a launch occurred (I remember using the dragon rider environmental impact statement for the longest time). But if each CRS flight is bringing up two wings, they must be exceptionally light.

Anyways, CRS-22 NET is coming up quite fast (June).
« Last Edit: 03/19/2021 12:15 pm by ncb1397 »

Offline cohberg

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #37 on: 04/07/2021 04:18 pm »
https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/team-readies-solar-arrays-for-flight-to-station

Quote from: Danielle Sempsrott
NASA and Boeing workers lift solar arrays into flight support equipment on April 2, 2021, in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASAís Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 63- by- 20-foot solar arrays will launch to the International Space Station later this year.

They are the first two of six new solar arrays that in total will produce more than 120 kilowatts of electricity from the Sunís energy, enough to power more than 40 average U.S. homes. Combined with the eight original, larger arrays, this advanced hardware will provide 215 kilowatts of energy, a 20 to 30 percent increase in power, helping maximize the space stationís capabilities for years to come. The arrays will produce electricity to sustain the stationís systems and equipment, plus augment the electricity available to continue a wide variety of public and private experiments and research in the microgravity environment of low-Earth orbit.

Most of the station systems, including its batteries, scientific equipment racks, and communications equipment have been upgraded since humans began a continuous presence on the orbiting laboratory in November 2000. For more than two decades, astronauts have lived and worked on this unique orbiting lab, supporting scientific research that has led to numerous discoveries that benefit people on Earth and prepare for future Artemis missions to the Moon and beyond. Photo Credit: NASA/Frank Michaux
« Last Edit: 04/09/2021 06:21 pm by cohberg »

Offline Raffaele_Di_Palma

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #38 on: 04/10/2021 09:13 am »
Hi there!

Just an image made to show how the iROSA first set will fitting into the Trunk.

The space between the Dragon shell and the load will be occupied by the cargo integration structure. I took as a reference the distance between the edge of the trunk and the PDGF seen during the Bishop deploy, then adap but what matters in this image is to show the relative dimensions.

Offline cohberg

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #39 on: 04/20/2021 04:06 pm »
Some additional screenshots from DOUG's Stage_65-7_v4 release.

I've included details on the hooks we see on the iROSA bracket and how it relates to the pictures we got of the real arrays.

These screenshots (to me) highlight how important it is for the 2 halves (a male and a female side [per DOUG]) to interlock firmly together as the combined assembly does not have a center support and is only supported by the 2 outside booms.

I've also highlighted the locking pins that secure the 2 halves together. I'm assuming that they are driven electromagnetically after the 2 sides are mated.

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