Author Topic: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)  (Read 47596 times)

Offline starbase

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ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« on: 07/23/2020 01:15 pm »
Interesting bit from this article: https://www.spaceflightinsider.com/missions/iss/spacewalkers-set-the-stage-for-future-iss-additions/

Quote
H-FIXTURE REMOVAL WORK
Once RiTS was installed and its occupants checked into their quarters, Cassidy and Behnken moved onto the second set of tasks, removing “H-fixtures” on the base of two solar arrays — mast canisters — on the port side of the ISS, according to NASA.

These were originally used for ground processing of the arrays before they were launched and are no longer needed. In their place is expected to be installed a piece of equipment to hold new solar arrays within the next several years.

Called iROSA, or ISS Roll Out Solar Array, these power-generating devices are designed to improve and augment the existing eight arrays, which collectively take up a space larger than an American football field. As they are aging — the oldest pair was launched in 2001 with the other three launched between 2006 and 2009.

Each iROSA is expected to be placed in front of the legacy arrays, according to NASA, and be attached via a modification kit installed onto the same mount the H-fixtures are on.

While each iROSA will shadow about two-thirds of the legacy arrays, the setup is expected to “increase power performance compared to the legacy ISS solar array.”

Ultimately, six iROSA devices will be delivered via three SpaceX Dragon cargo launches starting as early as 2021, according to NASA.

Only two H-fixtures were removed during U.S. EVA-68. A total of six need to be removed for all six iROSA modification kits to be installed.

One H-fixture was originally scheduled to be removed during the July 1 spacewalk. However, complications prevented its removal and required teams on the ground to re-evaluate their procedures and develop a way to pry them away from the canister.

Attached is also a PDF about iROSA from the NASA Technical Reports Server: https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20190032191.pdf

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Offline robertross

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #1 on: 07/23/2020 01:26 pm »
As long as deployment doesn't require the good old 'Curbeam manuver'...classic memories from the good old shuttle days.
Those sticking arrays were painful to watch (and the tear), but the solution admirable.

Offline leetdan

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #2 on: 07/23/2020 02:04 pm »
Those array deployments were indeed epic... Beamer and Suni shakes on STS-116, and of course Scott Parazynski's STS-120 EVA (at the end of the OBSS, itself at the end of the SSRMS).  Remember the OBSS was left at the ISS in case this sort of thing ever happened again.

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2006/12/eva-4-required-despite-heroic-shakes/
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2007/11/eva-4-success-with-array-repair-atlantis-rolls-ahead-of-sts-122/

Offline Sesquipedalian

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #3 on: 07/26/2020 12:11 am »
I'll ask the obvious question... why are there six and not eight ROSAs?

Offline robertross

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #4 on: 07/26/2020 01:13 am »
I'll ask the obvious question... why are there six and not eight ROSAs?

I would venture a guess that higher efficiency cells make it unnecessary to place more.

Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #5 on: 07/26/2020 02:02 am »
Imagine 8 of those new arrays powering a Solar Electric Propulsion bus! That would be a good unit to combine with chemical propulsion stages on a big Exploration spacecraft.
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Offline Robotbeat

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #6 on: 07/26/2020 04:50 am »
Wow, this is super cool; I had no idea ISS was getting new (additional) wings!

Does anyone know the mass of each iROSA?
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Offline AstroWare

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #7 on: 07/26/2020 01:42 pm »
I'll ask the obvious question... why are there six and not eight ROSAs?

I would venture a guess that higher efficiency cells make it unnecessary to place more.
The NTRS presentation referenced includes the following (page 4):

"Upgrading  all  8 power  channels  would  provide  the  most operational  flexibility  for  the program 

6 channels  is  the  minimum  amount required  to  avoid  negatively impacting  ISS operations."

I would imagine that if the (6) upgrades go well, that eventually they decide to do all (8).

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #8 on: 07/26/2020 05:48 pm »
I'll ask the obvious question... why are there six and not eight ROSAs?

I would venture a guess that higher efficiency cells make it unnecessary to place more.
The NTRS presentation referenced includes the following (page 4):

"Upgrading  all  8 power  channels  would  provide  the  most operational  flexibility  for  the program 

6 channels  is  the  minimum  amount required  to  avoid  negatively impacting  ISS operations."

I would imagine that if the (6) upgrades go well, that eventually they decide to do all (8).
The final 2 depend on further ISS Programme extension as S6 has the youngear pair of arrays.

Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #9 on: 07/28/2020 09:45 pm »
I've trawled the internets and tried to find out if the iROSA arrays are silicon-based, or gallium-arsenide. I've not been able to find out. does anyone know?
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Offline whitelancer64

Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #10 on: 07/28/2020 10:31 pm »
I've trawled the internets and tried to find out if the iROSA arrays are silicon-based, or gallium-arsenide. I've not been able to find out. does anyone know?

Gallium Arsenide. Image is from the PDF in the first link.
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Offline AnalogMan

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #11 on: 07/28/2020 10:41 pm »
I've trawled the internets and tried to find out if the iROSA arrays are silicon-based, or gallium-arsenide. I've not been able to find out. does anyone know?

They are triple junction cells made by Spectrolab (so not silicon-based).  This info is in the NTRS presentation attached to the first post (page attached, click to enlarge).
« Last Edit: 07/28/2020 10:42 pm by AnalogMan »

Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #12 on: 07/28/2020 10:51 pm »
Ah! Humble thanks, my bad - I did not recognize the acronym of 'GaAs' until you directed me to the appropriate image. Been looking at my too-small phone screen too much. Now that I'm back on my new, 27-inch monitor it's as clear as a bell.
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Offline Jansen

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #13 on: 11/09/2020 01:44 pm »
Wanted to note that iROSA is now nominally rostered for CRS-22, scheduled for May 2021.

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=52211.0

Offline Jansen

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #14 on: 12/21/2020 05:16 pm »
Quote
 IPA project will deliver 6 new external solar array wings in 3 pairs on flights SpX-22, SpX-25, and SpX-26.
 EVA tasks to configure the target wing locations has already begun, with support structure removal tasks during the most recent 3B battery EVAs. EVA tasks to complete configuration will continue throughout the remainder of 2020.
• First delivery of 2 IPA Mod Kits is complete for manifest on NG-14
• Installation to the 2B & 4B Mast Canisters is expected on the IROSA Prep EVA post Crew-1 arrival
 Manufacturing of the first two ISS Roll Out Solar Array (IROSA) wings is in work for SpX-22
◦ The current schedule has limited margin
 Manufacturing of the first composite Deployable Carrier continues to support launch package integration upon arrival of IROSA Wing 1 & 2 in December 2020
 

Source document:
https://www.nationalacademies.org/event/10-14-2020/docs/D0CE42612418D93FC850A8B8383F306148EC43CCAE2D
(Attached as well)
« Last Edit: 12/21/2020 05:22 pm by Jansen »

Offline Raffaele_Di_Palma

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #15 on: 01/06/2021 12:49 pm »
On the EVA planned for the 1st feb, Kathleen Rubins and Victor Glover will start the path for the iROSAs.

Here's a video that show the assembling sequence of bracket mountings.

Hope you like it :)

« Last Edit: 01/06/2021 12:58 pm by Raffaele_Di_Palma »

Offline Josh_from_Canada

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #16 on: 01/11/2021 07:44 pm »
https://twitter.com/BoeingSpace/status/1348732046865272834
Quote
Making power moves.

A new set of Boeing-built solar arrays will help power
@Space_Station
 to keep cutting-edge orbital research capabilities and commercial opportunities going for years to come.

Release: https://boeing.mediaroom.com/news-releases-statements?item=130801

Article:
Quote
HOUSTON, Jan. 11, 2021 – Boeing [NYSE: BA] will support the International Space Station’s (ISS) growing research capabilities and commercial opportunities with new solar arrays to increase the orbiting laboratory’s power supply. The modification to Boeing’s ISS sustainment contract with NASA calls for Boeing to deliver six additional solar arrays to NASA for installation beginning in 2021.

The new 63-foot-by-20-foot (19-meter-by-6-meter) arrays will together produce more than 120 kilowatts of electricity from the sun’s energy, enough to power more than 40 average U.S. homes. Combined with the eight original, larger arrays, this advanced hardware will provide a 20 to 30 percent increase in power, helping to maximize the station’s capabilities for years to come. The arrays will provide ISS with electricity to sustain its systems and equipment, plus augment the electricity available to continue a wide variety of public and private experiments and research in the station’s unique microgravity environment.

“When it comes to game-changing research and technological development, the space station is currently hitting its full stride,” said John Mulholland, ISS vice president and program manager for Boeing. “These arrays, along with other recent upgrades to the station’s power system and data-transfer speed, will ensure that ISS remains an incubator and business model in the commercial space ecosystem for the coming decades. Access to this unique lab will continue to pay off as researchers study the challenges of future deep-space exploration and make discoveries that improve life on Earth.”

Most of the ISS systems, including its communications systems, batteries and scientific equipment racks, have been upgraded since humans began a continuous presence on the orbiting laboratory in November 2000. Two International Docking Adapters, manufactured by Boeing, have been attached to the ISS to allow commercial spacecraft to dock autonomously to the station. Boeing is the prime contractor for ISS sustainment; the company’s studies have determined that the ISS could safely operate beyond 2030 if NASA and its international partners choose to do so.

Deployable Space Systems of Santa Barbara, California, will produce the structure of the new arrays, including the canister and frame that will unfurl to hold the solar-array blankets in place. Deployable Space Systems also built the canister, frame and solar array blanket for a prototype of the new arrays that was successfully tested aboard the ISS in June 2017.

Spectrolab, a Boeing company based in Sylmar, California, produces the arrays’ XTJ Prime solar cells, which will be some of the most powerful ever launched into space. They are the same solar cells that power Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft in flight and while docked to the ISS. Spectrolab also produced the station’s original solar cells, as well as the solar cells tested on the prototype.

“The XTJ Prime space solar cells are much more efficient than any of their predecessors and are fit to support the cutting-edge research being done aboard the International Space Station,” said Tony Mueller, president of Spectrolab.

For more information on Spectrolab, visit www.spectrolab.com. For more information on Boeing Defense, Space & Security, visit www.boeing.com. Follow us on Twitter at @BoeingSpace.

Boeing is the world’s largest aerospace company and leading provider of commercial airplanes, defense, space and security systems, and global services. As the top U.S. exporter, the company supports commercial and government customers in more than 150 countries and leverages the talents of a global supplier base. Building on a legacy of aerospace leadership, Boeing continues to lead in technology and innovation, deliver for its customers and invest in its people and future growth.
« Last Edit: 01/11/2021 07:45 pm by Josh_from_Canada »
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Offline SMS

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #17 on: 01/11/2021 08:04 pm »
https://twitter.com/Free_Space/status/1348730703731695616


Jan. 11, 2021
New Solar Arrays to Power NASA’s International Space Station Research

As the International Space Station orbits Earth, its four pairs of solar arrays soak up the sun’s energy to provide electrical power for the numerous research and science investigations conducted every day, as well as the continued operations of the orbiting platform. The space station is the springboard to NASA's Artemis missions to the Moon, a platform to test advanced technologies for human exploration of deep space and future mission to Mars. NASA also has opened the space station for business and commercial activities, including private astronauts missions.

Designed for a 15-year service life, the solar arrays have been operating continuously since the first pair was deployed in December 2000, with additional array pairs delivered in September 2006, June 2007, and March 2009. The first pair of solar arrays has now provided continuous electrical power to the station for more than 20 years as more modules were added and dozens of crews tackled thousands of scientific experiments and continued operations through hundreds of spacewalks, cargo missions, and more.

Though they are functioning well, the current solar arrays are showing signs of degradation, as expected. To ensure a sufficient power supply is maintained for NASA’s exploration technology demonstrations for Artemis and beyond as well as utilization and commercialization, NASA will be augmenting six of the eight existing power channels of the space station with new solar arrays. Boeing, NASA’s prime contractor for space station operations, its subsidiary Spectrolab, and major supplier Deployable Space Systems (DSS) will provide the new arrays. The combination of the eight original, larger arrays, and the smaller, more efficient new arrays will restore the power generation of each augmented array to approximately the amount generated when the original arrays were first installed, providing a 20% to 30% increase in power for space station research and operations.

The new solar arrays will be a larger version of the Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) technology that successfully demonstrated the mechanical capabilities of solar array deployment during its test on the space station in June 2017.

The new solar arrays will be positioned in front of six of the current arrays, and will use the existing sun tracking, power distribution, and channelization. This approach is similar to the one used to upgrade the station’s external television cameras to high definition, using the existing power and control mechanisms.

The new arrays will shade slightly over half of the length of the existing arrays and will be connected to the same power system to augment the existing supply. The eight current arrays are currently capable of generating up to 160 kilowatts of power during orbital daytime, about half of which is stored in the station’s batteries for use while the station is not in sunlight. Each new solar array will produce more than 20 kilowatts of electricity, eventually totaling 120 kilowatts (120,000 watts) of augmented power during orbital daytime. In addition, the remaining uncovered solar array pair and partially uncovered original arrays will continue to generate approximately 95 kilowatts of power for a total of up to 215 kilowatts (215,000 watts) of power available to support station operations at completion. For comparison, an active computer and monitor may use up to 270 watts, and a small refrigerator uses about 725 watts.

The solar arrays will be delivered to the International Space Station in pairs in the unpressurized trunk of the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft during three resupply missions starting in 2021, when the second pair of current arrays reaches the 15th year of its design life. The installation of each solar array will require two spacewalks: one to prepare the worksite with a modification kit and another to install the new solar array.

NASA signed a modification to the ISS Vehicle Sustaining Engineering contract with Boeing to provide the six new solar arrays. Doing so provides the International Space Station with enough power to maintain normal operations and ensure adequate power for future opportunities in low-Earth orbit, whether for NASA and its international partners or commercial companies.

Deployable Space Systems ROSA solar array
Credits: Deployable Space Systems
---
SMS ;-).

Offline Lars-J

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #18 on: 01/11/2021 08:16 pm »
Will the new solar panels be in addition to the existing ones? (if so where will they be located)
Or replace some of them? (if so, how will the existing ones be disposed of)

Offline Lars-J

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #19 on: 01/11/2021 08:22 pm »

Offline mtlapointe

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #20 on: 01/11/2021 08:55 pm »
If you watch the video someone posted above, there will be brackets added to the original Solar Array Mast Canisters and the new iROSA arrays will mount and deploy from there.

Offline mtlapointe

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #21 on: 01/11/2021 09:04 pm »
I'll ask the obvious question... why are there six and not eight ROSAs?

Because the new arrays are far more efficient, only 6 are required to provide sufficient power well into the future.

Offline SMS

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---
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Offline mtlapointe

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #23 on: 01/11/2021 09:12 pm »
Here is a video of ground deployment of the first iROSA array at DSS in Goleta, CA:


Offline pospa

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #24 on: 01/13/2021 02:01 pm »
Will the new solar panels be in addition to the existing ones? (if so where will they be located)
Or replace some of them? (if so, how will the existing ones be disposed of)

See page 5 of this document:
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20190032191/downloads/20190032191.pdf

Offline Nomadd

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #25 on: 01/14/2021 05:25 am »
 Is 160 kw for the old arrays right? I hadn't heard that they were that degraded.
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Offline russianhalo117

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #26 on: 01/14/2021 05:57 am »
I'll ask the obvious question... why are there six and not eight ROSAs?

Because the new arrays are far more efficient, only 6 are required to provide sufficient power well into the future.
Because S6 SAW's are the newest and contract options will not be exercised until they first exceed their design life and ISS is officially extended beyond 2025 with ROSCOSMOS being the holdout at this time because of new internal mandates et al. The original plan before shuttle programme end was to retract and remove and replace Solar Array Blanket Boxes as a single unit. That isn't possible today so IROSA is the workaround solution for ISS Extension and utilization.

Offline cohberg

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #27 on: 01/19/2021 04:57 pm »
As part of the mod kit referenced above, there are two ~8ft long struts (per array) that brace the upper triangle (which the IROSA arrays mount to) against the solar array blanket box launch bracket.

I was wondering how multiple ~8ft long pieces of equipment got shipped as pressurized cargo for EVA-71. I did finally find that they were launched on NG-14 but still struggled to understand how they were packed. You would need custom mounts / enclosures / rearranged cargo layout etc. to accommodate something that long.

Turns out the clever engineers at NASA (that is cleverer than tunnel visioned me) have figured out an innovative technique of sending up boltable sections instead of monolithic struts. /s It does not make sense to burn CTBs and time on custom oversized packaging that is only going to be used once. ;D Instead, the shorter segments look like they could easily fit in an M02 bag or smaller (You can also see the segment details in the CAD model).

You can see Walker and Rubin assembling them in the attached composited / annotated photos.

It appears to still be a tight fit in the airlock but I'm sure that they've worked on the geometry and modeling + developed detailed procedures on the sequence to egress / how to arrange everything.
« Last Edit: 01/20/2023 06:30 pm by cohberg »

Offline SWGlassPit

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #28 on: 01/27/2021 04:23 pm »
Do we know why the mid strut appears to telescope?

I'm guessing that
1. If the tolerances were too tight that they would have difficulty assembling it and needed "slack" in the assembly. The EVA steps have them engaging all the push in place pins (PIP) first before tightening the collars
2. The long lower struts are bolted (as apposed to telescoping as well as the loads are greater radially and less from side to side + they needed a fixed triangle (lower strut, mast tower and the upper triangle) to get the geometry correct.

This is more or less correct.  It allows the correct length to be dialed in, which could vary on orbit due to thermal expansion, etc.  Fully collapsed, the telescoping strut also takes up less room on the ride up and in the airlock.

Offline Space Pete

Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #29 on: 02/19/2021 11:13 am »
A look at how the iROSAs will be delivered to the ISS - on a pallet that will be removed from the Dragon Trunk, and placed on the POA.
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Offline Rondaz

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #30 on: 02/24/2021 06:59 pm »
U.S. Spacewalk 71 Animation


Offline russianhalo117

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #31 on: 02/25/2021 12:37 am »
A look at how the iROSAs will be delivered to the ISS - on a pallet that will be removed from the Dragon Trunk, and placed on the POA.
HTV-9 EP will need to jettisoned prior to the EVA's.

Offline Space Pete

Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #32 on: 02/26/2021 09:32 am »
HTV-9 EP will need to jettisoned prior to the EVA's.

Which will be done by the SSRMS apparently!
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Offline Hog

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #33 on: 02/26/2021 01:36 pm »
HTV-9 EP.

HTV-9=H-2 Transfer Vehicle-9 which is the Japan ISS transfer vehicle

EP=Exposed Pallet?
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Offline russianhalo117

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #34 on: 02/26/2021 08:52 pm »
HTV-9 EP.

HTV-9=H-2 Transfer Vehicle-9 which is the Japan ISS transfer vehicle

EP=Exposed Pallet?
Yes. Alternate name is Unpressurized Logistics Carrier but MHI and JAXA primarily associate ULC with the HTV Module section the EP is housed in for flight.

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #35 on: 03/19/2021 01:07 am »
Re-posting this in this thread. I looked at all the documents so far, and none listed mass of the iROSA arrays.

Why is this so hard to find?? This is a key piece of information for architectural trade studies. I swear to Goddard, Boeing, if you're insisting on keeping this "proprietary," I hope SpaceX beats SLS core to space with Starship.




So, plenty of info is available for the subscale ROSA array demo on ISS.

But for the life of me, I can't find a scrap of info on the actual mass of the ROSA *upgrades* for the ISS's arrays.

I can find a bunch of hyper-optimistic figures from early SBIR work done by DSS for ROSA, but no actual final mass figures for these 25kW ROSA array sections. Anyone know how many kilograms each of them are?

The lack of information is frustrating compared to the wealth of info on the old arrays.
« Last Edit: 03/19/2021 01:07 am by Robotbeat »
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Offline ncb1397

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #36 on: 03/19/2021 12:12 pm »
Presumably, we get those (or an approximate value once you back out a guesstimate for the carriers) in the press kit for the CRS missions they fly on when they do the manifest breakdown. It was similarly very difficult to find mass figures for commercial crew vehicles basically until a launch occurred (I remember using the dragon rider environmental impact statement for the longest time). But if each CRS flight is bringing up two wings, they must be exceptionally light.

Anyways, CRS-22 NET is coming up quite fast (June).
« Last Edit: 03/19/2021 12:15 pm by ncb1397 »

Offline cohberg

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #37 on: 04/07/2021 04:18 pm »
https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/team-readies-solar-arrays-for-flight-to-station

Quote from: Danielle Sempsrott
NASA and Boeing workers lift solar arrays into flight support equipment on April 2, 2021, in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 63- by- 20-foot solar arrays will launch to the International Space Station later this year.

They are the first two of six new solar arrays that in total will produce more than 120 kilowatts of electricity from the Sun’s energy, enough to power more than 40 average U.S. homes. Combined with the eight original, larger arrays, this advanced hardware will provide 215 kilowatts of energy, a 20 to 30 percent increase in power, helping maximize the space station’s capabilities for years to come. The arrays will produce electricity to sustain the station’s systems and equipment, plus augment the electricity available to continue a wide variety of public and private experiments and research in the microgravity environment of low-Earth orbit.

Most of the station systems, including its batteries, scientific equipment racks, and communications equipment have been upgraded since humans began a continuous presence on the orbiting laboratory in November 2000. For more than two decades, astronauts have lived and worked on this unique orbiting lab, supporting scientific research that has led to numerous discoveries that benefit people on Earth and prepare for future Artemis missions to the Moon and beyond. Photo Credit: NASA/Frank Michaux
« Last Edit: 04/09/2021 06:21 pm by cohberg »

Offline Raffaele_Di_Palma

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #38 on: 04/10/2021 09:13 am »
Hi there!

Just an image made to show how the iROSA first set will fitting into the Trunk.

The space between the Dragon shell and the load will be occupied by the cargo integration structure. I took as a reference the distance between the edge of the trunk and the PDGF seen during the Bishop deploy, then adap but what matters in this image is to show the relative dimensions.

Offline cohberg

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #39 on: 04/20/2021 04:06 pm »
Some additional screenshots from DOUG's Stage_65-7_v4 release.

I've included details on the hooks we see on the iROSA bracket and how it relates to the pictures we got of the real arrays.

These screenshots (to me) highlight how important it is for the 2 halves (a male and a female side [per DOUG]) to interlock firmly together as the combined assembly does not have a center support and is only supported by the 2 outside booms.

I've also highlighted the locking pins that secure the 2 halves together. I'm assuming that they are driven electromagnetically after the 2 sides are mated.

Offline jbenton

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #40 on: 05/16/2021 12:04 am »
Re-posting this in this thread. I looked at all the documents so far, and none listed mass of the iROSA arrays.

Why is this so hard to find?? This is a key piece of information for architectural trade studies. I swear to Goddard, Boeing, if you're insisting on keeping this "proprietary," I hope SpaceX beats SLS core to space with Starship.


So, plenty of info is available for the subscale ROSA array demo on ISS.

But for the life of me, I can't find a scrap of info on the actual mass of the ROSA *upgrades* for the ISS's arrays.

I can find a bunch of hyper-optimistic figures from early SBIR work done by DSS for ROSA, but no actual final mass figures for these 25kW ROSA array sections. Anyone know how many kilograms each of them are?

The lack of information is frustrating compared to the wealth of info on the old arrays.

I'm not sure if you're still looking, but I was able to find something. When CRS-11 sent the one-winglet prototype to the station in 2017, NASA released this press release:
https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/spacex_crs-11_mission_overview.pdf

It says that the ROSA payload was 325 kg, so I'm guessing iROSA is slightly more than 650 kg?

This article seems to say that a ROSA should have 66% - 75% less mass than a previous-generation system of the same size:
https://web.archive.org/web/20180306022835/https://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-485987901.html

This article from before one was built - when it was proposed as part of Mega-ROSA - says that it was to have a power density of >200 - 400 W/kg at its Beginning of Life.

Offline SWGlassPit

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #41 on: 05/18/2021 02:47 pm »
I've also highlighted the locking pins that secure the 2 halves together. I'm assuming that they are driven electromagnetically after the 2 sides are mated.

I don't know about the yellow, but the blue and purple items look to me like EVA bolts.  Yellow may just be an alignment pin.

Offline Jansen

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #42 on: 05/20/2021 06:09 pm »
NASA TV will cover IROSA installation

June 16, Wednesday
6:30 a.m. – Coverage of International Space Station Expedition 65 U.S. spacewalk # 74 to install the first IROSA solar array on the P6 Truss for the 2B Channel Power System; spacewalk scheduled to begin at 8 a.m. EDT and will last 6 ½ hours with Pesquet and Kimbrough (All Channels)

June 20, Sunday
6:30 a.m. – Coverage of International Space Station Expedition 65 U.S. spacewalk # 75 to install the second IROSA solar array on the P6 Truss for the 4B Channel Power System; spacewalk scheduled to begin at 8 a.m. EDT and will last 6 ½ hours with Pesquet and Kimbrough (All Channels)

Offline Jansen

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #43 on: 05/27/2021 04:52 am »
Crossposted:
Well, what IS the mass of iROSA???????
Can’t find the information anywhere! Very different from the original ISS solar arrays which have public mass figures.

Each SAW is 2400 pounds. The iROSAs will shadow 2/3s of the SAWs, but are 20% lighter.

So ~1280 pounds each, or around 2560 pounds (1161.2kg) for both iROSAs.

NASA should be releasing more concrete figures this week.

During the media briefing today, the total iROSA payload was stated to weigh 3000 pounds, at around the 22 minute mark.

Offline Jansen

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #44 on: 05/28/2021 01:49 pm »
Mass of iROSA confirmed as 3,042 pounds / 1,380 kilograms

Offline ncb1397

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #45 on: 05/28/2021 02:19 pm »
So, 690 kg per 20 KW wing. So 300 KW would be on the order of 10 t. Looks like NASA/Boeing/DSS has the required technology in place and nearly flight qualified to build the Deep Space Transport.

« Last Edit: 05/28/2021 02:26 pm by ncb1397 »

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #46 on: 05/28/2021 05:03 pm »
So, 690 kg per 20 KW wing. So 300 KW would be on the order of 10 t. Looks like NASA/Boeing/DSS has the required technology in place and nearly flight qualified to build the Deep Space Transport.
Made In Space Archinaut technology should reduce wing mass considerably. They 3d print boom and power bus in space, still use same solar blankets as ROSA.

Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk


Offline Robotbeat

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #47 on: 05/28/2021 05:54 pm »
So, 690 kg per 20 KW wing. So 300 KW would be on the order of 10 t. Looks like NASA/Boeing/DSS has the required technology in place and nearly flight qualified to build the Deep Space Transport.
29W/kg is pretty crappy compared to UltraFlex at 100-150W/kg or similar figures given for ROSA earlier.

I have a feeling they’re not optimizing for mass THAT hard. But it’s disappointing.
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Offline ncb1397

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #48 on: 05/28/2021 06:34 pm »
So, 690 kg per 20 KW wing. So 300 KW would be on the order of 10 t. Looks like NASA/Boeing/DSS has the required technology in place and nearly flight qualified to build the Deep Space Transport.
29W/kg is pretty crappy compared to UltraFlex at 100-150W/kg or similar figures given for ROSA earlier.

I have a feeling they’re not optimizing for mass THAT hard. But it’s disappointing.

I expect what is included in each calculation is different between the two numbers. Expecting a 300 KW system to only mass 3 t and fly on Vega is probably a stretch.

edit: looking at the photo, there is a lot more than just the arrays. You have the grapple fixture attached to a long tube which attaches to the support structure for the two solar array assemblies. All of that is likely included in the dragon unpressurized cargo mass figure. Why the solar arrays are suspended rather than on top of the beams that attach to the inside of the trunk likely has to do with where the trunk can hold payloads or extraction considerations.
« Last Edit: 05/28/2021 07:28 pm by ncb1397 »

Offline wjbarnett

Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #49 on: 05/28/2021 07:35 pm »
The 1380kg mass likely includes the flight support stricture(s) used to keep the array secure within Dragon and allow the CanadaArm2 to remove and relocate them to station. So that mass figure is NOT a good figure of merit, imho.
Jack

Offline Rondaz

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #50 on: 06/04/2021 01:11 pm »
That Dragon trunk is full of power! Once those iROSA solar panels are installed on the @Space_Station, they will roll out like a giant yoga mat. A supercharged yoga mat that provides an increase in energy available for research and station activities.

https://twitter.com/ISS_Research/status/1400508986718294020
Modify message

Offline Rondaz

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #51 on: 06/04/2021 01:13 pm »
SpaceX CRS-22: Dragon Spacecraft Separation


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Offline Bob Shaw

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #53 on: 06/15/2021 10:05 pm »
Am I right in assuming that as much of the installation as possible will be done during orbital darkness, or at least with the new and old arrays in shadow?

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #54 on: 06/15/2021 10:12 pm »
Am I right in assuming that as much of the installation as possible will be done during orbital darkness, or at least with the new and old arrays in shadow?

Only cable demating and mating need to be done on the dark side. The rest of the timeline is unconstrained.

Offline SMS

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #55 on: 06/23/2021 06:28 am »
2B (July 20, 2021) -> 4B (July 25, 2021) -> ??

Do we know the later order for future IROSA pairs of batteries in the next Dragon CRS-24 and 25 flights?

2B -> 4B -> 4A?

1A -> 3A -> 3B?

Who knows the schedule order of batteries IROSA assembly and which astronauts are trained to assemble them with the current and future USOS ISS crews?

Thanks for any information on that topic!
« Last Edit: 06/24/2021 05:16 am by SMS »
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Offline Sesquipedalian

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #56 on: 06/25/2021 04:18 am »
Did they consider using an astronaut mounted on the OBSS to carry the iROSA out to its destination?  From my armchair perspective it seems like that would be faster and simpler than passing it back and forth down the truss.  And this is exactly the sort of reason that OBSS was left on the station in the first place.
« Last Edit: 06/25/2021 04:18 am by Sesquipedalian »

Offline Jim

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #57 on: 06/25/2021 11:52 am »
Did they consider using an astronaut mounted on the OBSS to carry the iROSA out to its destination?  From my armchair perspective it seems like that would be faster and simpler than passing it back and forth down the truss.  And this is exactly the sort of reason that OBSS was left on the station in the first place.

OBSS was not made for carrying loads.  It does not have an end effector on it.  It is only for personnel movement and access.

Offline Sesquipedalian

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #58 on: 06/25/2021 04:37 pm »
It has something like an APFR where an astronaut can stand, doesn't it?  So the OBSS (or technically the Enhanced ISS Boom Assembly) could hold the APFR, the APFR could hold the astronaut, and the astronaut could hold the iROSA.

That said, if the loads are indeed too much for the OBSS/EIBA, then that's a deal-breaker.
« Last Edit: 06/25/2021 04:38 pm by Sesquipedalian »

Offline SWGlassPit

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #59 on: 06/25/2021 11:39 pm »
It has something like an APFR where an astronaut can stand, doesn't it?  So the OBSS (or technically the Enhanced ISS Boom Assembly) could hold the APFR, the APFR could hold the astronaut, and the astronaut could hold the iROSA.

That said, if the loads are indeed too much for the OBSS/EIBA, then that's a deal-breaker.

I've not seen any analysis on it, but I'd put money on 1100 pounds (solar array plus crew member) being too much mass to swing around on the end of the EIBA.

Offline litton4

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #60 on: 07/01/2021 10:02 am »
Prevent me from going mad. The NASA update I had this morning stated that Dragon had carried all 6 iROSAs !

Quote
.....Dragon launched June 3 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy, arriving at the station a little less than 16 hours later. The spacecraft delivered more than 7,300 pounds of research investigations, crew supplies, and vehicle hardware to the orbiting outpost. Dragon’s external cargo “trunk” carried six new ISS Roll-Out Solar Arrays (iROSAs),.......

This is wrong - there are just 2 going up this time........?
Dave Condliffe

Offline AmigaClone

Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #61 on: 07/01/2021 12:16 pm »
Prevent me from going mad. The NASA update I had this morning stated that Dragon had carried all 6 iROSAs !

Quote
.....Dragon launched June 3 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy, arriving at the station a little less than 16 hours later. The spacecraft delivered more than 7,300 pounds of research investigations, crew supplies, and vehicle hardware to the orbiting outpost. Dragon’s external cargo “trunk” carried six new ISS Roll-Out Solar Arrays (iROSAs),.......

This is wrong - there are just 2 going up this time........?

I suspect that either the person writing the press release misspelled two or that there were some words missing (perhaps: the first two of the ).

Offline vp.

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #62 on: 07/03/2021 05:19 am »
On which cargo ship the next iRosa panel supports are to be shipped ?

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #63 on: 07/03/2021 10:16 pm »
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Offline vp.

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #64 on: 07/04/2021 06:48 am »
My question is about the supports (mounts), not the solar panels.
The first 2 supports came with Cygnus 15. What about the next ones ? With Cygnus 16 for august EVA ?

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #65 on: 08/27/2021 05:10 pm »
Next solar array delivery is on SpX-26 (from Joel Montalbano at SpX-23 press conference)

Offline Rondaz

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #66 on: 07/03/2022 04:51 pm »
Testing and folding of the new #ISS solar panels .

https://twitter.com/SpaceNosey/status/1543577034349240324

Offline Josh_from_Canada

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #67 on: 05/26/2023 07:21 pm »
The iROSAs for the 1A and 1B power channels are scheduled to be launched in the trunk of SpX-28 on June 3rd with 1A being installed on June 9th and 1B being installed on June 15th

This is the first time I'm hearing there will be iROSAs for the 2A and 3B power channels

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-to-provide-briefing-coverage-of-spacewalks-for-station-upgrades
Launches Seen: Atlas V OA-7, Falcon 9 Starlink 6-4, Falcon 9 CRS-28,

Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #68 on: 05/30/2023 01:46 am »
The iROSAs for the 1A and 1B power channels are scheduled to be launched in the trunk of SpX-28 on June 3rd with 1A being installed on June 9th and 1B being installed on June 15th

This is the first time I'm hearing there will be iROSAs for the 2A and 3B power channels

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-to-provide-briefing-coverage-of-spacewalks-for-station-upgrades
Just came back for giving an idea https://twitter.com/RaffaeleDiPalma/status/1663257505974059024
Why not make last two arrays transformational

Offline Josh_from_Canada

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #69 on: 05/30/2023 02:20 am »
Why not make last two arrays transformational

As that would require a new design to be certified for flight, NASA had signed a contract with Boeing for 6 iROSAs that included an option for an additional two. Certifying a new design is more expensive and take more time so NASA went with the option to order two additional iROSAs as it meets their power requirements for the ISS
Launches Seen: Atlas V OA-7, Falcon 9 Starlink 6-4, Falcon 9 CRS-28,

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #70 on: 05/30/2023 03:35 am »
Why not make last two arrays transformational

As that would require a new design to be certified for flight, NASA had signed a contract with Boeing for 6 iROSAs that included an option for an additional two. Certifying a new design is more expensive and take more time so NASA went with the option to order two additional iROSAs as it meets their power requirements for the ISS
Plus ground spares.

Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #71 on: 05/30/2023 02:45 pm »
Why not make last two arrays transformational

As that would require a new design to be certified for flight, NASA had signed a contract with Boeing for 6 iROSAs that included an option for an additional two. Certifying a new design is more expensive and take more time so NASA went with the option to order two additional iROSAs as it meets their power requirements for the ISS
Plus ground spares.
i didn't understood your point. Irosa will be used as the baseline just swapping solar cells (different) and adding reflectors i am fairly familiar that iss needs proves tech most of the time. But this is an old proven nasa tech. This was tested on dart spacecraft's rosas. The screenshot in previous post shows darts tsas.
« Last Edit: 05/30/2023 02:54 pm by Chinakpradhan »

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