Author Topic: Atlas V 401 - Landsat 9 - Vandenberg - 27 September 2021 (18:12 UTC)  (Read 46238 times)

Offline Rondaz

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Cubesats are way. Next stop for Centaur: Point Nemo

https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1442592304942837762

Offline Rondaz

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Centaur AV-092 deorbit burn seen from London  (cool eh @torybruno ?)

https://twitter.com/planet4589/status/1442598828155179010

Offline Rondaz

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And another Centaur deorbit burn view from Essex..

https://twitter.com/planet4589/status/1442599125975928833

Offline Vahe231991

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With Landsat 9 having reached orbit, there is just one Atlas V launch from Vandenberg Space Force Base remaining, which will carry the JPSS-2 satellite.

Offline WheelsStop

Here's a short series of aerial photos (approximately L+35s, 55s, 1:30, and 1:45). 

It was very hazy aloft with smoke from the fires burning in the southern Sierras.  Couldn't see much of the usual texture of the marine layer.  Couldn't really see a well defined horizon.  The Atlas V just faded into a milky barely-blue sky.

Offline Rondaz

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The CUTE exoplanet study cubesat has been deployed and its signals are being received.

https://twitter.com/planet4589/status/1442606031012462595


Offline Star One

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Archived launch coverage from NASA:


Offline OneSpeed

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Here is a plot of the available telemetry from the Landsat-9 mission. It is great to see ULA providing this amount of data in real time, including downrange distance.

Some points of interest are:

1. Velocity is displayed in orbital coordinates rather than the more usual inertial coordinates. This means that the velocity at liftoff is already about 383m/s, and only increases very slowly at first as the orthogonal vertical component is added.

2. The 5 and 4.6g limiting throttle profiles are clearly evident before booster engine cut-off (BECO).

3. The second stage initially climbs at almost constant velocity on its way to a direct orbital insertion.
« Last Edit: 09/28/2021 11:42 pm by OneSpeed »

Offline Rondaz

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Landsat 9 - Amazing facts about the new Earth observer


Online FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1443337661733908489

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Another bullseye.  Robin Hood has nothing on Mighty Atlas...  #Landsat

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Offline Star One

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Landsat 9 launch as seen by GOES 17:


Offline Rondaz

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NASA Science Live: Landsat - A Legacy of Seeing Earth from Space


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https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1445094295589965824

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Mighty Atlas is honored to have done his part

Offline Targeteer

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November 05, 2021
21-143
NASA, USGS Release First Landsat 9 Images
The first image collected by Landsat 9, on Oct. 31, 2021, shows mangroves along the northwest coast of Australia clustered in protected inlets and bays on the edge of the Indian Ocean. Fluffy cumulus clouds and high-altitude cirrus clouds hover nearby.
Mangroves are prominent along the northwest coast of Australia. The first image collected by Landsat 9, on Oct. 31, 2021, shows mangroves clustered in protected inlets and bays on the edge of the Indian Ocean. Fluffy cumulus clouds and high-altitude cirrus clouds hover nearby. The aqua colors of the shallow near-shore waters give way to the deep, dark blues of the ocean.
Credits: NASA
 

Landsat 9 carries two instruments designed to work together to capture a broad range of wavelengths: the Operational Land Imager 2 and the Thermal Infrared Sensor 2. Data from both instruments are shown in this image.

Credits: NASA

Landsat 9, a joint mission between NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that launched Sept. 27, 2021, has collected its first light images of Earth.

The images, all acquired Oct. 31, are available online. They provide a preview of how the mission will help people manage vital natural resources and understand the impacts of climate change, adding to Landsat’s unparalleled data record that spans nearly 50 years of space-based Earth observation.

“Landsat 9’s first images capture critical observations about our changing planet and will advance this joint mission of NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey that provides critical data about Earth's landscapes and coastlines seen from space,” said NASA Administrator Bill Nelson. “This program has the proven power to not only improve lives but also save lives. NASA will continue to work with USGS to strengthen and improve accessibility to Landsat data so decision makers in America – and around the world – better understand the devastation of the climate crisis, manage agricultural practices, preserve precious resources and respond more effectively to natural disasters.”

These first light images shows Detroit, Michigan, with neighboring Lake St. Clair, the intersection of cities and beaches along a changing Florida coastline and images from Navajo Country in Arizona that will add to the wealth of data helping us monitor crop health and manage irrigation water. The new images also provided data about the changing landscapes of the Himalayas in High Mountain Asia and the coastal islands and shorelines of Northern Australia.

Landsat 9 is similar in design to its predecessor, Landsat 8, which was launched in 2013 and remains in orbit, but features several improvements. The new satellite transmits data with higher radiometric resolution back down to Earth, allowing it to detect more subtle differences, especially over darker areas like water or dense forests. For example, Landsat 9 can differentiate more than 16,000 shades of a given wavelength color; Landsat 7, the satellite being replaced, detects only 256 shades. This increased sensitivity will allow Landsat users to see much more subtle changes than ever before.

“First light is a big milestone for Landsat users – it’s the first chance to really see the kind of quality that Landsat 9 provides. And they look fantastic,” said Jeff Masek NASA’s Landsat 9 project scientist at Goddard Space Flight Center. “When we have Landsat 9 operating in coordination with Landsat 8, it’s going to be this wealth of data, allowing us to monitor changes to our home planet every eight days.”

Landsat 9 carries two instruments that capture imagery: the Operational Land Imager 2 (OLI-2), which detects visible, near-infrared and shortwave-infrared light in nine wavelengths, and the Thermal Infrared Sensor 2 (TIRS-2), which detects thermal radiation in two wavelengths to measure Earth’s surface temperatures and its changes.

These instruments will provide Landsat 9 users with essential information about crop health, irrigation use, water quality, wildfire severity, deforestation, glacial retreat, urban expansion, and more.

“The data and images from Landsat 9 are expanding our capability to see how Earth has changed over decades”, said Karen St. Germain, Earth Science Division director at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “In a changing climate, continuous and free access to Landsat data, and the other data in NASA’s Earth observing fleet, helps data users, including city planners, farmers and scientists, plan for the future.”

NASA’s Landsat 9 team is conducting a 100-day check-out period that involves testing the satellite’s systems and subsystems and calibrating its instruments in preparation for handing the mission over to USGS in January. USGS will operate Landsat 9 along with Landsat 8, and together the two satellites will collect approximately 1,500 images of Earth’s surface every day, covering the globe every eight days.

“The incredible first pictures from the Landsat 9 satellite are a glimpse into the data that will help us make science-based decisions on key issues including water use, wildfire impacts, coral reef degradation, glacier and ice-shelf retreat and tropical deforestation,” said USGS Acting Director Dr. David Applegate. “This historic moment is the culmination of our long partnership with NASA on Landsat 9’s development, launch and initial operations, which will better support environmental sustainability, climate change resiliency and economic growth – all while expanding an unparalleled record of Earth's changing landscapes.” 

Landsat 9 data will be available to the public, for free, from USGS’s website once the satellite begins normal operations.

NASA manages the Landsat 9 mission development. Teams from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, also built and tested the TIRS-2 instrument. NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, managed the mission’s launch. The USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center will operate the mission and manage the ground system, including maintaining the Landsat archive. Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colorado, built and tested the OLI-2 instrument. United Launch Alliance is the rocket provider for Landsat 9’s launch. Northrop Grumman in Gilbert, Arizona, built the Landsat 9 spacecraft, integrated it with instruments, and tested it.

For more information on Landsat 9 and the Landsat program, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/Landsat9
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Offline Conexion Espacial

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Some of the images obtained by the LandSat-9 satellite.
1. Himalayas.
2. Florida Panhandle.
3. Navajo Nation.
4. Western Australia.
Source: NASA/USGS
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Offline Yiosie

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Update: the Cesium Mission 1 cubesats failed after launch.

CesiumAstro raises $60 million in Series B funding round [dated Mar. 2]

Quote from: SpaceNews
CesiumAstro attempted to test communications payloads on two cubesats launched in September on a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket alongside the NASA-U.S. Geological Survey Landsat 9 mission. Unfortunately, both cubesats experienced what Sabripour thinks were power failures that precluded demonstrations the company planned. Sabripour declined to name the cubesat manufacturer.

Offline Targeteer

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August 11, 2022
RELEASE 22-086
NASA Transfers Landsat 9 Satellite to USGS to Monitor Earth’s Changes

NASA transferred ownership and operational control on Thursday of the Landsat 9 satellite to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in a ceremony in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Landsat 9 is the most recent in the Landsat series of remote-sensing satellites, which provide global coverage of landscape changes on Earth. The Landsat program – a joint effort between NASA and USGS – recently marked 50 years of continuous service on July 23.

“For more than fifty years now, Landsat satellites have helped us learn more about how Earth systems work, how human activities affect those systems, and how we can make better decisions for the future,” said NASA Administrator Bill Nelson. “Landsat 9, the latest joint effort by NASA and USGS, proudly carries on that remarkable record.”

NASA launched Landsat 9 from Vandenberg Space Force Base in California on Sept. 27, 2021. Since then, NASA mission engineers and scientists, with USGS collaboration, have been putting the satellite through its paces – steering it into its orbit, calibrating the detectors, and collecting test images. Now fully mission-certified, the satellite is under USGS operational control for the remainder of its mission life.

“Our partnership with NASA over many years has been good for science and good for the American people," said Assistant Secretary for Water and Science Tanya Trujillo. “A half-century archive of Landsat’s Earth observations is a magnificent achievement in the history of science. This fifty-year record gives scientists a consistent baseline that can be used to track climate change and enables them to see changes to the land that might not otherwise be noticed.”

Landsat 9 joined Landsat 8, which has been orbiting since 2013. Together, the two satellites collect images of Earth’s full surface every eight days. USGS specialists collect an average of 740 Landsat 9 scenes every day from around the world to be processed and archived at the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science Center in Sioux Falls.

Remote-sensing satellites such as Landsat help scientists observe the world using ranges of light beyond the power of human sight to monitor land changes that may have natural or human causes. Landsat is unique because it consistently captures a comprehensive view of Earth at a moderate resolution of approximately 30 meters, the area of a baseball infield. This global view of changes on the land through decades provides an unparalleled perspective for a broad range of data applications in fields such as agriculture, water management, forestry, disaster response, and – crucially – climate change science.

Estimates indicate Landsat provides billions of dollars in value to the U.S. economy each year. Starting in 2008, Landsat images and data became available to the public at no charge. This policy has served to expand applications of Landsat data that enable greater efficiencies for government agencies while creating profitable commercial opportunities for information service industries.

With a data user community that keeps growing, scientists and engineers are already looking forward to the next mission. NASA and USGS are developing options for the next iteration of Landsat, currently called Landsat Next.

The Landsat program has provided continuous global coverage of landscape change since 1972. Landsat’s unique long-term data record provides the basis for a critical understanding of environmental and climate changes occurring in the United States and around the world.

For more information on Landsat 9 and the Landsat program, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/Landsat
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

 

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