Author Topic: Next generation Russian crew vehicle enters initial testing  (Read 1850 times)


Offline Coastal Ron

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Their spacecraft looks like a SpaceX Dragon Cargo with an Orion LAS on top.

Compared to the part of the Soyuz spacecraft that currently returns to Earth, this spacecraft is going to be a big increase in volume and mass returned to Earth for them.
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Offline Ben Hawes

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Great! I was hoping we'd see this start to be covered on NSF. Looks like Orion wanted to be, a mix of Dragon but with capability of Orion, likely for a fraction of the cost.

Offline asmi

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Congratulation to Nicolas for the debut! And it's a good one too!

Offline mtakala24

Excellent article!

Offline AS_501

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It will be interesting to see what kind of field tests they conduct (parachute drop, pad abort, high-altitude abort, etc.).  Any material out there on the type of docking system and possible compatibility with other vehicles?

Online brickmack

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Previous plan was a derivative of SSVP, with a wider hatch and modifications for reusability. They seem to want to eventually use this for LOP-G though, which would mean IDS. The widened SSVP port isn't ISS-compatible either, so they'd need either the existing SSVP port, or IDS, and theres only going to be 2 IDSes on station in the near term. Putting adapters on the existing Russian modules (like IDA or the adapter on the end of Nauka) would solve a lot of problems for all ISS partners (all non-CBM vehicles could dock at any port, lots of schedule flexibility there), but would cost a lot extra most likely.

Early on, Soyuz was going to use APAS for ISS missions, but then they switched. Not really sure why, APAS-Soyuz had already been demonstrated on Mir. Just for compatibility with existing module hardware perhaps? That would've really simplified things though
« Last Edit: 06/14/2018 06:25 PM by brickmack »

Online russianhalo117

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Previous plan was a derivative of SSVP, with a wider hatch and modifications for reusability. They seem to want to eventually use this for LOP-G though, which would mean IDS. The widened SSVP port isn't ISS-compatible either, so they'd need either the existing SSVP port, or IDS, and theres only going to be 2 IDSes on station in the near term. Putting adapters on the existing Russian modules (like IDA or the adapter on the end of Nauka) would solve a lot of problems for all ISS partners (all non-CBM vehicles could dock at any port, lots of schedule flexibility there), but would cost a lot extra most likely.

Early on, Soyuz was going to use APAS for ISS missions, but then they switched. Not really sure why, APAS-Soyuz had already been demonstrated on Mir. Just for compatibility with existing module hardware perhaps? That would've really simplified things though
APAS has a higher mass than SSVP. Around the time when Soyuz-U2 (Could lift more to orbit) was prematurely retired the design of the Russian Segment was switched back to SSVP.

Offline yg1968

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Offline Archibald

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Very interesting, good work !
... that ackward moment when you realize that Jeff Bezos personal fortune is far above NASA annual budget... 115 billion to 18 billion...

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