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Well the forcing function will move one step down the line. Whats the next expensive industry in the way of exploiting space. I'd say payload manufacture.

And spacex is already looking into this.

So what's after that? I've no idea.
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I was under the impression that NASA required 5 practice crew loadings before flight mission. This would be the first opportunity. Also I understood that the crew would board, strap in, then get out and leave before fuel loading.
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You can get as much high pressure OX or CH4 as you want by pumping LOX or LCH4 into high pressure tanks and raising the temperature until desired pressure is reached.
Subject only to the yield strength limit being breached by the temperature you raise to, and the subsequent plastic deformation of the tank.... LOL.. (just start with higher pressure feedstock, it's solvable, but I thought it amusing to tie this back)
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Other US Launchers / Re: US Launch Schedule
« Last post by Salo on Today at 05:16 am »
http://www.launchphotography.com/Delta_4_Atlas_5_Falcon_9_Launch_Viewing.html
Quote
A Falcon 9 from pad 40 will launch the Nusantara Satu (PSN-6) communication satellite for Indonesia along with the private Beresheet moon lander for Israel, on February 18 or 19, at about 9pm EDT. A Falcon 9 from pad 39A is slated to launch the first Crew Dragon space capsule on an uncrewed demonstration mission, DM-1, to the ISS on mid February at the very earliest, at about 8am EDT if that time. The launch time gets 22-26 minutes earlier each day. Sunrise is about 7am EDT. The launch window is instantaneous. Other upcoming launches include a Falcon 9 scheduled to launch the next Dragon resupply mission to the ISS from pad 40, CRS-17, on March 16, at about 9:30pm EDT.
...
The next Delta 4 launch from Cape Canaveral, a Delta 4 medium on its next to last flight, will launch
WGS-10 for the US Air Force on March 13 at 6:58pm EDT. The launch window stretches about an hour.
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True that it may, Iím not sure itís 100% correct to say they wonít need helium. I think non- engine derived high pressure gas may still be required from time to time. For example, doesnít the Raptor still need something to spin up the turbos during startup?
Musk himself has stated before that they do not want to use helium. They plan to use autogenous pressurization because Musk severely dislikes helium for pressurization. Given the problems they have had with helium tanks, I can't blame him.

You can get as much high pressure OX or CH4 as you want by pumping LOX or LCH4 into high pressure tanks and raising the temperature until desired pressure is reached.

John
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Mars is the main reason they cannot use helium.
IIUC, SH won't use Helium either, and it's not going to Mars.

I think Musk doesn't like expendable stuff. He is scarce, SH is large, and SH will fly very often.

I think He is out no matter how you look at it.
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I think that something like PPPL's Direct Fusion Drive, or Uri Shumlak's Sheared Flow Stabilized Z- Pinch could be better (provided they work as predicted). They are a lot more compact (especially the Z- Pinch) and relatively low mass. I believe that a Sheared Flow Stabilized Z- Pinch could enable SSTO.
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Note that active cooling only costs fuel.

I don't think so. The actively cooled region is going to be heavier and more expensive per square meter.

Blimey, Iím glad youíre here to set Elon straight. He nearly made a boo boo changing to steel!
No that's DaveJes ...

Ok guys, enough.
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Mars is the main reason they cannot use helium.
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