Author Topic: LIVE: STS-133 Flight Days 8/9 - PMM Outfitting, Off Duty, President, Transfers  (Read 77282 times)

Online Chris Bergin

James on ground crews when Discovery lands.

Nicole - it's going to be a sad day. We all appreciate the history and legacy of the space shuttle. Will be hard to walk away from this seemingly brand new vehicle to us for retirement. It seems there is just an abundant pride to work on these vehicles. It shines through in the state Discovery is in right now. In the end we'll be taking the time to celebrate it was a wonderful program.

Difference between Shuttle and Soyuz re-entry.

Mike - Soyuz was after six months flight. I'll probably look like the typical people coming down and we're seated upwards on shuttle, and the G is much less. 1.2 Gs will feel like 3 after being up here. For most part people do well.

ESA questions.

On international partners.

Commander Kelly - I think it's great. It's one of the biggest significant achievements. A real highlight of the program.

Paolo's getting a lot of questions in Italian :)

About six questions for him! At the end Paolo and Commander Lindsey both grinned at each other, as Paolo looked over the moon about the interest in him :)
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Offline jarthur

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I had to step out for a few minutes. Did anyone catch the answer to Cady's question about if the ZSR's are all the same? I would have assumed that they are, but am no longer so sure since they are supposed to move ZSR's out of some slots in the PMM only to go and put a different ZSR in the same slot.


Offline Space Pete

I had to step out for a few minutes. Did anyone catch the answer to Cady's question about if the ZSR's are all the same? I would have assumed that they are, but am no longer so sure since they are supposed to move ZSR's out of some slots in the PMM only to go and put a different ZSR in the same slot.

All ZSRs are the same - they are standard racks. The reason for moving some ZSRs around inside the PMM is because they were mounted on top of other racks for launch, and now they must be assembled in their own rack bays.
« Last Edit: 03/04/2011 04:47 pm by Space Pete »
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Offline Fuji

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Inside the PMM, I can see the four ZSR.

Offline Space Pete

Attached are images of the PMM's launch config vs. the on-orbit config. This is what the STS-133 crew have been working on today. Note that the two ISPs and two of the RSPs in the final config image will be going down on HTV-2.

These images are taken from a 70-page Increment 25 & 26 overview document, available to download in full on L2.
« Last Edit: 03/04/2011 05:27 pm by Space Pete »
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Offline jarthur

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I had to step out for a few minutes. Did anyone catch the answer to Cady's question about if the ZSR's are all the same? I would have assumed that they are, but am no longer so sure since they are supposed to move ZSR's out of some slots in the PMM only to go and put a different ZSR in the same slot.

All ZSRs are the same - they are standard racks. The reason for moving some ZSRs around inside the PMM is because they were mounted on top of other racks for launch, and now they must be assembled in their own rack bays.

Thanks. So why do this sequence? why not do PMM1S4 > Pmm1P2?

ZSR at PMM1S3 > PMM1P2.
ZSR at PMM1S4 > PMM1S3.

Offline Space Pete

Thanks. So why do this sequence? why not do PMM1S4 > Pmm1P2?

ZSR at PMM1S3 > PMM1P2.
ZSR at PMM1S4 > PMM1S3.

Good catch - you just spotted an error on my part! :)

ER-8 is at PMMS3, not S2. My original post has been corrected.

Therefore, in answer to your question: A ZSR was installed on top of ER-8 at PMM1S3. That ZSR was relocated to PMM1P2 in order to clear the way for ER-8 to be relocated.

Once ER-8 had been relocated, the ZSR installed atop the RSR at PMM1S4 was moved into the empty bay at PMM1S3, in order to allow access to the RSR at PMM1S4.
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Offline Fuji

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I think back side two folding ZSRs were temporary set for the STS-133 crew photo session for blindfold  :)
« Last Edit: 03/04/2011 08:36 pm by Fuji »

Online Chris Bergin

Also appears their will be a MSB today - at 5pm Central.
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Offline Fuji

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Offline Space Pete

FD7 Photos. R2 and EVA2 photos released.
http://www.spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-133/flightday07/ndxpage1.html

NASA images of this mission have so far been awful.

There were less than two pages of images released for FD-8. There was less than one page for FD-4.

ISS is currently in a unique configuration that we will never see again. Where are the images of ATV-2's interior? Where are the images of HTV-2's interior?

During Discovery's approach to the ISS on FD-3, just before sunset, the Shuttle crew would've had an amazing view of HTV-2 berthed to Node 2 Zenith (we all remember the amazing shots from STS-130). Where are those images?

During EVA-2, I watched on NASA TV as Steve Bowen photographed HTV-2 from the end of the SSRMS. Where are those images?

This unique moment in station history is going largely unseen by the public. Very very sad, and a tad annoying too, seems as US taxpayers have paid for these images that they never get to see. :(
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Offline Jim

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This unique moment in station history is going largely unseen by the public. Very very sad, and a tad annoying too, seems as US taxpayers have paid for these images that they never get to see. :(

They don't care and wouldn't know any difference from other photos
« Last Edit: 03/04/2011 07:37 pm by Jim »

Offline Space Pete


This unique moment in station history is going largely unseen by the public. Very very sad, and a tad annoying too, seems as US taxpayers have paid for these images that they never get to see. :(

They don't care and wouldn't know any difference from other photos

Maybe the "general" public won't/don't, but us NASA fans do (at least I certainly do).

I've always wondered why NASA doesn't seem to be interested in catering for its biggest fans. I think the PAO who releases the images should at least have some technical knowledge of the ISS, so they they can recognise the significance of certain images (i.e. HTV on Node 2 Zenith).
« Last Edit: 03/04/2011 07:40 pm by Space Pete »
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Offline saturnapollo

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Quote
Maybe the "general" public won't/don't, but us NASA fans do (at least I certainly do).

I couldn't agree more. I am often amazed at the selection of photos which are made public when we know that there are more interesting photos for them to chose from (e.g. Bowen's EVA2 photos from the end of the SSRMS). There really should be someone at the PR dept. who has a photographic background (Is Mike Gentry still there?) to make a better selection - and more of them! I had thought Discovery's last mission might have prompted better coverage.

We can only hope that Chris' contacts come through!

Keith
« Last Edit: 03/04/2011 07:46 pm by saturnapollo »

Online jcm

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This unique moment in station history is going largely unseen by the public. Very very sad, and a tad annoying too, seems as US taxpayers have paid for these images that they never get to see. :(

They don't care and wouldn't know any difference from other photos

Maybe the "general" public won't/don't, but us NASA fans do (at least I certainly do).

I've always wondered why NASA doesn't seem to be interested in catering for its biggest fans. I think the PAO who releases the images should at least have some technical knowledge of the ISS, so they they can recognise the significance of certain images (i.e. HTV on Node 2 Zenith).

This is a continuing frustration. The PAOs in recent years haven't had a technical background, and I don't think they appreciate how much the geek fans of NASA are a 'force multiplier' who go out into their communities and spread positive stories about NASA - when we are provided with the high quality (meaning detailed and technical) background info to let us do that.

(this is a generalization and obviously there are some really good people in the NASA system as well, but on average it's been hard to get good info out of NASA. Stupid overconservative interpretation of ITAR doesn't help either I suspect...)
« Last Edit: 03/04/2011 07:49 pm by jcm »
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Online Chris Bergin


We can only hope that Chris' contacts come through!

Keith

Now we're up to date on MER/MMT, this is my number one priority, ahead of a weekend of bugging people ;D
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Offline nooneofconsequence

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This is a continuing frustration. The PAOs in recent years haven't had a technical background, and I don't think they appreciate how much the geek fans of NASA are a 'force multiplier' who go out into their communities and spread positive stories about NASA - when we are provided with the high quality (meaning detailed and technical) background info to let us do that.
Look at it a different way. This could easily be seen as overt political advocacy, which in the government is supposed to be a "bad thing"  ... even though it happens all the time with top level people with "foot in mouth" disease. Last thing a politico wants is to fund a public mouthpiece of some sort that might hypothetically be used against them ...

Quote
(this is a generalization and obviously there are some really good people in the NASA system as well, but on average it's been hard to get good info out of NASA. Stupid overconservative interpretation of ITAR doesn't help either I suspect...)
No - not ITAR.  It's just that the good ones find better things to do where they are appreciated more. Hiring is more focused on "safe" "dumb" types who are recognizable as "PR flack" types . And some "educators" sometimes.
"Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something" - Plato

Offline Space Pete

I'm actually considering E-mailing the NASA PAO to raise these issues. Seems as my opinions seem to be shared by a few others on here, I wonder whether anyone else would be willing to do the same? Perhaps if enough people say the same thing, NASA will put more images online.

Spaceflight imagery is, I think, the single most important aspect of public outreach, as images/video are the only way that the public can experience what is going on up there. Text-based articles can give you info, but if no-one can see what's actually going on, then that's a big loss IMO. NASA doesn't seem to realise this, as they continue to hide images away on a site that is only known by a handful of people.

Sorry to go off topic - back to FD-9 coverage now. :)
« Last Edit: 03/04/2011 08:05 pm by Space Pete »
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Online Chris Bergin

I'll say one thing to close this part of the conversation. The PAO commentators have been the best I think we've had for many a mission. Josh is brilliant - very "human", less "reading off a script" and sounds interested, for starters.
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Offline Space Pete

I'll say one thing to close this part of the conversation. The PAO commentators have been the best I think we've had for many a mission. Josh is brilliant - very "human", less "reading off a script" and sounds interested, for starters.

I will 100% concur with that. There hasn't been any babbling of random, irrelevant facts on this mission. NTV PAOs have been excellent, and I've loved their tributes/nostalgic reflections on Discovery, which you can tell come from the heart.
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