Author Topic: Expedition 70 Thread  (Read 135616 times)

Online Yellowstone10

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #480 on: 11/29/2023 04:50 pm »
A few pictures of Progress MS-23's departure this morning from the YouTube stream - note that the station has pitched 90° "nose-up" to allow the Progress to depart rearward relative to the station's velocity vector.

Online Yellowstone10

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #481 on: 11/29/2023 07:27 pm »
Dextre has been hanging out towards the front end of the station today, probably for photo surveys of one or both of the Dragons - first over the top of Kibo, then underneath it.

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #482 on: 11/29/2023 08:58 pm »
Aging, Human Research Studies Ahead of Next Cargo Mission

Mark Garcia Posted on November 29, 2023

The International Space Station hosted numerous microgravity experiments on Wednesday investigating how the human body adapts to weightlessness and ways to live and work off the Earth. The Expedition 70 crewmembers also continued preparing for a cargo mission then conducted an emergency drill.

More aging research was underway aboard the orbital lab today as NASA astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli processed samples inside the Kibo laboratory module for the Space AGE study. The biology work took place in Kibo’s Life Science Glovebox and may provide better insights into the aging process on cells and its effects on disease mechanisms both on Earth and in space.

Working in the Columbus laboratory module, NASA Flight Engineer Loral O’Hara configured and wore portable medical gear that is monitoring her blood pressure for the CIPHER human research study. She conducted other research activities throughout the day including inspecting microbial detection hardware and calibrating components inside the Combustion Integrated Rack.

Commander Andreas Mogensen began his day documenting his reactions to a new lighting system that may help astronauts maintain their circadian rhythms in outer space. The ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut then uploaded software for a technology experiment demonstrating how the Astrobee free-flying robotic helpers, and potentially future satellites, can rendezvous, dock, and undock autonomously.

Astronaut Satoshi Furukawa of JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) was back on life support duty servicing Kibo’s Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS). The ITCS cools and rejects heat from equipment ensuring a safe operating environment aboard the space station.

The Roscosmos Progress 84 resupply ship ended its cargo mission today after six months docked to the Poisk module. The uncrewed and trash-packed Progress 84 departed the station at 2:55 a.m. EDT then reentered the Earth’s atmosphere above the south Pacific Ocean for a fiery, but safe demise a few hours later.

The next cargo mission to resupply the Expedition 70 crew is counting down to launch at 4:25 a.m. on Friday from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The Progress 86 resupply ship, carrying nearly 5,600 pounds of cargo, will take a two-day trip to the orbiting lab and dock to the same port vacated by the Progress 84. Cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Nikolai Chub reviewed procedures today for monitoring the approaching cargo craft and practiced remotely controlling the Progress 86 if necessary.

Cosmonaut Konstantin Borisov watered plants and photographed them for a space botany study. Afterward, he checked Roscosmos tablet computers then worked in the Nauka science module maintaining its ventilation systems.

At the end of the day, all four astronauts joined the three cosmonauts and simulated an emergency with ground controllers practicing their roles and responsibilities during the drill. The orbital residents located emergency systems throughout the space lab while coordinating with mission controllers from around the world.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2023/11/29/aging-human-research-studies-ahead-of-next-cargo-mission/

Nov. 29, 2023: International Space Station Configuration. Five spaceships are parked at the space station including the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft, the SpaceX Dragon Endurance crew spacecraft, Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus space freighter, the Soyuz MS-24 crew ship, and the Progress 85 resupply ship.
« Last Edit: 11/29/2023 09:12 pm by ddspaceman »

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #483 on: 11/29/2023 09:01 pm »
Jasmin Moghbeli
@AstroJaws
Earlier today, @roscosmos cargo vehicle Progress undocked and departed from @Space_Station. Nearly four hours after undocking, I was able to spot it burning up in the atmosphere and even capture a few photos of it. It happened faster than I thought and was only visible for about 2-3 minutes. It reminded me a bit of fireworks, especially when it broke apart. Thanks to those on the ground who helped direct me in where to look!

https://twitter.com/AstroJaws/status/1729948790767976488


Online Yellowstone10

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #484 on: 11/30/2023 03:19 pm »
Dextre is continuing the photo survey of Dragon this morning - now working on the station-starboard side.

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #485 on: 11/30/2023 05:08 pm »
International Space Station
@Space_Station
It took a lot of creative energy and  careful engineering to create a spacecraft that is now the brightest human-made object in the sky. Although they never met on Earth, the modules of the space station fit perfectly together when they met in space.

https://twitter.com/Space_Station/status/1730255372059885686

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #486 on: 11/30/2023 05:50 pm »
Robotics, Physics, and Biology as Crew Awaits Next Cargo Mission

Mark Garcia Posted on November 30, 2023

The Expedition 70 crew members turned their attention toward robotics and physics research today while continuing ongoing space biology studies. The orbital septet also will soon welcome a cargo craft due to launch to the International Space Station early Friday.

NASA Flight Engineer Jasmin Moghbeli turned on the Astrobee robotic free-flyers Thursday morning for a technology demonstration inside the Kibo laboratory module. In the afternoon, she installed components called CLINGERS on the Astrobees and monitored the cube-shaped robotic devices as they conducted docking maneuvers. The experiment seeks to prove new technology that may enable future satellites to rendezvous, dock, and undock autonomously.

Astronaut Satoshi Furukawa also worked in the Kibo lab swapping samples inside the Electrostatic Levitation Furnace. The high-temperature research facility allows safe observations of thermophysical properties such as density surface tension, and viscosity of materials difficult to achieve on Earth. Furukawa from JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) then worked in the afternoon setting up the new uTitan investigation in Kibo’s Life Science Glovebox to explore a method for extracting DNA samples in microgravity.

A variety of space biology investigations were also underway aboard the station seeking to improve life on Earth and in space. NASA Flight Engineer Loral O’Hara kicked off her day configuring the Advanced Plant Habitat for an upcoming botany study to explore how the plant immune system is affected by spaceflight conditions. Commander Andreas Mogensen peered at brain cell-like samples in a microscope for the Cerebral Aging study seeking a deeper understanding of ageing processes and neurodegenerative conditions.  Afterward, Mogensen from ESA (European Space Agency) printed cardiac cells using the BioFabrication Facility that is demonstrating printing organ-like tissues in microgravity.

Back on Earth at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the Roscosmos Progress 86 resupply ship stands ready to launch to the orbital outpost at 4:25 a.m. on Friday. The Progress 86 will orbit Earth for two days before docking to the station’s Poisk module at 6:14 a.m. on Sunday. Cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Nikolai Chub will be on duty monitoring the resupply ship’s arrival and ready to unpack the nearly 5,600 pounds of cargo a few hours later.

Kononenko remained focus on research Thursday activating a 3D printer to learn how to print tools and supplies promoting self-sufficient crews in space. Chub studied how microgravity affects fluid systems then tested futuristic spacecraft and robotic piloting techniques on a computer. Cosmonaut Konstantin Borisov serviced ventilation systems in the Zvezda service module, loaded software on computer tablets, then wrapped up his shift deactivating Earth observation hardware.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2023/11/30/robotics-physics-and-biology-as-crew-awaits-next-cargo-mission/

Astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli works on the BioFabrication Facility, a biological printer that is testing the printing of organ-like tissues in microgravity.


Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #487 on: 11/30/2023 08:58 pm »
Anatoly Zak
@RussianSpaceWeb
Progress MS-25 to launch from Kazakhstan tomorrow on #ISS resupply mission.
DETAILS, UPDATES: https://www.russianspaceweb.com/progress-ms-25.html

https://twitter.com/RussianSpaceWeb/status/1730332572922581382

Progress MS-25 to re-supply the ISS

The final Russian launch to the ISS in 2023 will send around 2.5 tons of cargo for Expedition 70. Progress MS-25 is scheduled to lift off from Baikonur in Kazakhstan on December 1 and expected to dock at the station on December 3.

Progress MS-25 mission at a glance:
Spacecraft designation(s)                    Progress MS-25, 11F615 No. 455, ISS mission 86P
Launch vehicle                                    Soyuz-2-1a, 14S53 No. M15000-067
Payload fairing                                   11S517A2 No. M15000-135
Launch site                                   Baikonur, Site 31, Pad 6
Mission                                           Cargo delivery to the ISS
Launch date and time                   2023 Dec. 1, 12:25:11 Moscow Time (planned)
Docking date and time                   2023 Dec. 3, 14:14 Moscow Time (planned)
Docking destination                           ISS, Russian Segment, Poisk module (MIM2), zenith port
Deliverable payload mass                   2,495 kilograms

Progress MS-25 mission

According to Roskosmos, the Progress MS-25 spacecraft was expected to carry around 2,500 kilograms of cargo to the station, including 515 kilograms of propellant for refueling the station, 420 kilograms of drinking water, 40 kilogram of pressurized nitrogen, and 1,500 kilograms of consumables, including materials for science experiments (INSIDER CONTENT), loaded in the pressurized cargo section and intended for the 70th long-duration expedition aboard the ISS.


Online Yellowstone10

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #488 on: 12/01/2023 11:30 am »
Dextre is back on the MBS this morning - must have finished up the photo survey while the video feed was out yesterday.

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #489 on: 12/01/2023 02:29 pm »
GT: Technical broadcast of the launch of the Progress MS-25 cargo ship



Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #490 on: 12/01/2023 02:34 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/29/2023

Bill Keeter Posted on November 29, 2023

84P Undocking: Last night, the Russian cargo vehicle, 84 Progress (84P), undocked from the ISS MRM-2 Zenith port at 1:55 AM CT. The deorbit burn occurred at approximately 5:02 AM CT followed by atmospheric entry and destruction. Progress telemetry was lost at approximately 5:37 AM CT and burn up occurred shortly thereafter.

Payloads:

Advanced Resistive Exercise Device – Kinematics (ARED-K): ARED-K Camera 2 was installed in Node 3 and the Acquisition Unit was activated. The ARED-K investigation assesses the current exercise programs to allow for the improvement of exercise prescriptions by conducting a biomechanical analysis of exercise on the ARED onboard the ISS.

Bio-Monitor: The Bio-Monitor wearable hardware was changed out as part of the 48-hour data collection session. The new garment was found to be faulty, so the crew doffed the new garment and re-donned an older garment to continue data collection. Bio-Monitor is a Canadian onboard instrument that serves as a platform for scientific experiments on the ISS. The instrument performs on-orbit monitoring of crew member physiological parameters, with wearable sensors that only minimally interfere with crewmember daily activities.

Complement of Integrated Protocols for Human Exploration Research on Varying Mission Durations (CIPHER): The Mobil-O-Graph Unit was donned and connected to the Columbus Payload Laptop and the EPM Virtual Machine in order to initiate a 13-hour data collection session. The CIPHER investigation aims to improve our understanding of physiological and psychological changes in humans on missions that range from weeks to one year in duration. Conducting the same research over missions of different durations allows scientists to extrapolate to multi-year missions, such as a three-year round-trip to Mars. These data could provide deeper knowledge about changes that may occur on such missions and support development of countermeasures to promote astronaut health and well-being.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR): The CIR was prepared for performing the first part of the Fuel Oxidizer Management Assembly (FOMA) Calibration in preparation for SoFIE operations. The CIR includes an optics bench, combustion chamber, fuel, and oxidizer control, and five different cameras for performing combustion investigations in microgravity.

CLINGERS: New software was uploaded to the Clinger unit (2) in preparation for Astrobee free flyer operations. Flight Tech Demo of Docking/Undocking CubeSats Inside ISS (CLINGERS) uses the ISS’s Astrobee robots to demonstrate an adaptor for docking and close approach sensing to connect both active and passive objects in space. These are critical functions to enable applications such as satellite servicing, orbital refueling, spacecraft repair and upgrade, and in-orbit manufacturing.

Space AGE: Media was exchanged in each Habitat (A, B, C) and placed back into SABL-3. Many changes to the human body seen in microgravity resemble those associated with aging on Earth. Aging-like changes to human immune cells are reversed after return to Earth. Tissue Engineered Liver Immune Chips in Microgravity as a Novel Platform to Study the Effect of Aged Immune Cells on Behavior and Regenerative Capacity of Liver Stem Cells (Space AGE) studies how microgravity-induced aging-like changes in immune cells affect the regenerative capabilities of liver cells and their postflight recovery. Results could improve understanding of the biology of aging and its effects on disease mechanisms

Space Health: Crew completed a Space Health Questionnaire. The Autonomous Health Monitoring for Adaption Assessment on Long Range Missions Using Big Data Analytic (Space Health) investigation utilizes the Bio-Monitor system for physiological monitoring before, during, and after an ISS mission to assess the effect of space travel on heart health. The potential use of the Bio-Monitor system on the Artemis analytical platform for future space missions is being evaluated. The Artemis analytical platform is used to provide automated analysis of the cardiovascular system in order to develop a near real-time assessment tool during long range missions.

Systems:

SpX-29 Cargo Transfer Operations: The crew continued transferring science and supplies to and from the SpaceX-29 cargo vehicle in support of science and ISS operations. SpaceX-29 will remain docked with the ISS until December.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Maintenance Canister Removal and Return to Ground Sampling: The previously installed ITCS Maintenance canister was removed from the JEM after antimicrobial agent Ortho Phthaladehyde (OPA) was fully dispersed throughout the JEM ITCS.  Photo documentation and ITCS fluid samples were taken for ground specialists to review.  These samples will return on SpX-29.  This activity was done as part of routine In-flight Maintenance (IFM). 

Emergency Simulation On-Board Training (OBT): Today, the crew participated in a training exercise for ISS rapid depressurization and fire emergency scenarios. The emergency training involved crew and ground teams working together to practice communication and coordination while the crew physically translated through ISS to the appropriate response locations to visualize the use of equipment and interfaces. A post-simulation crew conference took place to discuss and evaluate the crew/ground control responses during the training event.

Four Bed CO2 Scrubber (4BCO2) Restow: The crew restowed tools and replacement parts from the attempted 4BCO2 Remove and Replace (R&R) activity yesterday.  The crew will unstow this equipment and reattempt this R&R at a later date.  4BCO2 Scrubber demonstrates a technology for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere on a spacecraft. The technology is based on the current system in use on the ISS with mechanical upgrades in absorption beds, heater elements, and valves and use of an improved zeolite absorbent to reduce erosion and dust formation. A goal for next-generation systems is continuous operation for 20,000 hours without a failure, and this technology is a step toward that goal.

Environmental Health System (EHS) Coliform Water Sample Analysis: The crew completed post-processing analysis of the Coliform detection bags. The water samples were acquired on Monday and allowed to incubate to check for the presence of Coliform bacteria. Following the incubation period, the crew visually analyzed the Coliform detection bags and recorded the results. Visual confirmation must be performed within 40-48 hours of the initial sample collection.

Urine Transfer System (UTS) Offload EDV Swap:  Today, the crew swapped the EDV in the offload EDV spot of the UTS. The main objective of the UTS is to provide automated control of urine flow from Toilet System and Waste Hygiene Compartment (WHC) or from external storage containers into the UPA Wastewater Storage Tank Assembly (WSTA).

Completed Task List Activities:

Today’s Ground Activities:
All activities are complete unless otherwise noted.

    84P Undock Operations
    ISS Emergency Simulation Training Support
    MSS Survey of Crew-7

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #491 on: 12/01/2023 02:35 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/30/2023

Bill Keeter Posted on November 30, 2023

Payloads:

BioFabrication Facility (BFF): Cardiac Tissue Cassettes were inserted into the BFF and printing of cardiac cells was initiated. Using 3D biological printers to produce usable human organs has long been a dream of scientists and doctors around the globe; however, printing the tiny, complex structures found inside human organs, such as capillary structures, has proven difficult to accomplish in Earth’s gravity environment. To overcome this challenge, Techshot designed their BFF experiment to print organ-like tissues in microgravity, acting as a steppingstone in a long-term plan to manufacture whole human organs in space using refined biological 3D printing techniques.

Bio-Monitor: Bio-Monitor Wearable hardware was removed and data was downlinked completing a 48-hour data collection session. Bio-Monitor is a Canadian onboard instrument that serves as a platform for scientific experiments on the ISS. The instrument performs on-orbit monitoring of crew member physiological parameters, with wearable sensors that only minimally interfere with crewmember daily activities.

Cerebral Ageing: Microscopy was performed on Bio Cells 13 and 14. The Impact of Spaceflight on Human Brain Ageing Using Cerebral Organoids (Cerebral Ageing) investigation studies the effect of spaceflight and the durability in space on cerebral organoids, i.e., 3D human-derived structures that closely resemble a developing human brain, at the molecular and cellular level.

Complement of Integrated Protocols for Human Exploration Research on Varying Mission Durations (CIPHER): The Vascular Echo Mobil-O-Graph cuff was doffed and data was transferred for downlink, ending a 13-hour data collection. The CIPHER investigation aims to improve our understanding of physiological and psychological changes in humans on missions that range from weeks to one year in duration. Conducting the same research over missions of different durations allows scientists to extrapolate to multi-year missions, such as a three-year round-trip to Mars. These data could provide deeper knowledge about changes that may occur on such missions and support development of countermeasures to promote astronaut health and well-being.

CLINGERS: The crew installed two Clingers units onto the two Astrobee Free Flyers and assisted the ground team to conduct free flyer docking maneuvers. Unfortunately, the uploaded software was not behaving correctly and the session had to be aborted. Ground teams will evaluate for a forward plan. Flight Tech Demo of Docking/Undocking CubeSats Inside ISS (CLINGERS) uses the ISS Astrobee robots to demonstrate an adaptor for docking and close approach sensing to connect both active and passive objects in space. These are critical functions to enable applications such as satellite servicing, orbital refueling, spacecraft repair and upgrade, and in-orbit manufacturing.

Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF): ELF Cartridge A, holder 035 was removed and Cartridge 013 was installed. The ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate/melt/solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the Electrostatic Levitation method. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured, and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved. The ELF is located in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Multipurpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) in the Kibo Module.

Melanized Microbes for Multiple Uses in Space (MELSP): BRIC Canisters C & D are removed from MERLIN and placed into Minus Eighty-degree Laboratory Freezer for the ISS 1 (MELFI-1). Melanized Microbes for Multiple Uses in Space (MELSP) investigates how microgravity and cosmic radiation alter microbial melanin production and the role that melanin plays in fungal adaptation to the space environment. Melanin may help protect organisms in space conditions by providing physical shielding and by scavenging free radicals. Synthesis and production of melanin in microgravity could lead to new variants with novel properties and inspire development of new protective materials that are renewable and biodegradable.

NanoRacks Module-9: The crew activated and deactivated Designated Mixture Tubes for Operations #3. NanoRacks Module-9 is a module containing a complement of Mixture Tubes. These Mixture Tubes each contain a separate experiment that can be activated and deactivated while in zero-G. Tubes are a low-cost, high-return science opportunity for students to send experiments to ISS and encompass a wide range of science/disciplines. Mixture Tubes are very popular with middle and high school science programs and have also been used by private company research, technical schools, and individual research.

Plant Habitat: CO2 Bottle replacements was performed as part of preparation for Plant Habitat-06 operations. The Advanced Plant Habitat (Plant Habitat) is a fully automated facility that is used to conduct plant bioscience research on the ISS. It occupies the lower half of the EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack and one powered International Subrack Interface Standard (ISIS) drawer, providing a large, enclosed, environmentally controlled chamber.

Rhodium Biomanufacturing 02: Ambient Rhodium Microgravity Bioprospecting-2 Science Chambers S/Ns 0011-0020 were prepared and inserted into MELFI-2. Efficient and Resilient Biomanufacturing in Variable Gravity – Mission 2 (Rhodium Biomanufacturing 02) continues work to examine how microgravity affects biomanufacturing of therapeutics and nutraceuticals from bacteria and yeast. Microgravity is known to cause changes in cell growth and morphology and metabolic activity in microbes, which can affect biomanufacturing performance. Results could advance concepts of in-orbit servicing, assembly, and biomanufacturing of materials in space for use on future missions.

Nucleic Acid Extraction System (µTitan): Velcro bars were assembled and inserted along with bungees and Glovebox USB Camera into the LSG Work Volume. µTitan is an instrument used to isolate DNA from various samples in microgravity. Methods exist for sequencing DNA on the ISS, but no methods currently exist to extract DNA from a sample in space or the ISS. This technology could provide a tool for crew members on the space station to sequence DNA to answer health-related questions and identify microbial content in samples.

Systems:

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Survey of SpX-29: Robotics Ground Controllers are surveying the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of SpX-29 Cargo Dragon using the MSS. The survey began yesterday morning and is planned to conclude this evening. TPS inspections are performed on returning vehicles prior to undock from the ISS to ensure the vehicle is in a good configuration for re-entry.

Photo/TV Port ISS Roll Out Solar Array (IROSA) and Solar Array Wing (SAW) Survey Imagery: Micro Meteroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) present a potential risk to the solar arrays.  In order to determine current physical condition of SAW and IROSA structures, the crew took HD photos of IROSA 4A and SAW 2B and 4A. The SAWs are the main power generating systems of the ISS, producing electrical power from solar energy. IROSAs are new arrays being installed on the already existing SAWs. They provide additional power to station as well as setup ISS for future commercial modules

SpX-29 Cargo Transfer Operations: The crew continued transferring science and supplies to and from the SpaceX-29 cargo vehicle in support of science and ISS operations. SpaceX-29 will remain docked with the ISS until December.

ISS EveryWear (EVW) Medication and Nutrition Tracking: The crew recorded daily medication intake. EVW is an application on the crew’s personal tablets which connects to remote “wearable” sensors built into intelligent clothing. The program allows for extensive physiology data collection for both science research and medical follow-up purposes. This data will used for current ISS crew provision and exercise planning, as well as providing a better understanding of Human Spaceflight in general.

Completed Task List Activities:

Today’s Ground Activities:
All activities are complete unless otherwise noted.

    TPS Survey of SpX-29 [On-Going]
    N3 CDRA operations
    WSS SV10 Troubleshooting

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #492 on: 12/01/2023 02:38 pm »
Progress Launches, Cargo and Supplies Headed to Station

Abby Graf Posted on December 1, 2023

The uncrewed Roscosmos Progress 86 is safely in orbit headed for the International Space Station following launch at 4:25 a.m. EST Friday, Dec. 1 (2:25 p.m. Baikonur time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

The resupply ship reached preliminary orbit, and deployed its solar arrays and navigational antennas as planned, on its way to meet up with the orbiting laboratory and its Expedition 70 crew members.

Progress will dock to the station’s Poisk module on Sunday, Dec. 3 at 6:14 a.m. EST. Live coverage on NASA TV of rendezvous and docking will begin at 5:30 a.m.

Progress will deliver almost three tons of food, fuel and supplies to the space station.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2023/12/01/progress-launches-cargo-and-supplies-headed-to-station/

The Progress 86 cargo craft launches to the station from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 4:25 a.m. EST Friday, Dec. 1. Photo Credit: NASA TV

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #493 on: 12/01/2023 02:40 pm »
Katya Pavlushchenko
@katlinegrey
#ProgressMS25 separated from the 3rd stage and is now in orbit. The solar panels are deployed. It will fly to the ISS by the 2-days flight profile, the docking is expected on December 3 at 11:15 UTC.

https://twitter.com/katlinegrey/status/1730521627471855828


Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #494 on: 12/01/2023 02:42 pm »
International Space Station
@Space_Station
The Progress 86 cargo craft is safely in orbit and headed to the station with nearly three tons of food, fuel, and supplies following a successful launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 4:25am ET. Docking is set for 6:14am Sunday, Dec. 3. http://go.nasa.gov/47Ff5O8

https://twitter.com/Space_Station/status/1730523129133301772
« Last Edit: 12/01/2023 02:43 pm by ddspaceman »

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #495 on: 12/01/2023 02:54 pm »
Human Spaceflight
@esaspaceflight
Thunder and lightning! ⛈️

@Astro_Andreas managed to capture a red sprite, a rare lightning phenomenon, as part of the Thor-Davis experiment, led by @DTUSpace ⚡

The red sprite appeared above a thundercloud and Andreas captured it with a special event camera that allows us to see how the red sprite is formed🤯

Learn more about the experiment and see the video of the red sprite here👇
https://www.esa.int/Science_Exploration/Human_and_Robotic_Exploration/New_images_of_rare_thunder

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/1730525932572557787

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #496 on: 12/01/2023 03:13 pm »
Loral O'Hara
@lunarloral
My “bedside table” in space. While I am NOT one of these people on the ground, it turns out I am one of these people in space.

https://twitter.com/lunarloral/status/1730620200897147230


Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #497 on: 12/01/2023 03:17 pm »
Anatoly Zak
@RussianSpaceWeb
We shouldn't draw any historical parallels, but it turns out that a radiator on the newly launched Progress MS-25 cargo ship was accidentally hit by a fallen instrument during pre-launch processing.
DETAILS: https://www.russianspaceweb.com/progress-ms-25.html#sotr

https://twitter.com/RussianSpaceWeb/status/1730621054916112660



Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #498 on: 12/01/2023 09:44 pm »
Andreas Mogensen
@Astro_Andreas
On top of the world

I didn't get to see the Himalayan Mountains during my first mission in 2015. Therefore, it has been one of my goals for this mission.
 
Today, I saw the Himalayan Mountains on a clear and cloudless day, and I even believe I may have successfully photographed Mount Everest. However, I'm not entirely sure. I think Mount Everest is the peak with a few clouds, which I tried to mark in the last picture.
 
Can anyone confirm this? Or point out any of the other peaks? 🗻
 
https://twitter.com/Astro_Andreas/status/1730630696442438009

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #499 on: 12/01/2023 10:04 pm »
ISS Research
@ISS_Research
Today, @AstroJaws removed a recently printed cardiac tissue sample from the BioFabrication Facility (BFF), a bioprinter aboard the @Space_Station.

Using microgravity, BFF demonstrates tissue printing in space which may lead to the ability to print replacement organs and tissues for transplant.

https://twitter.com/ISS_Research/status/1730716012801356188

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